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The Global Homeland Security Education Network

The Global Homeland Security Education Network (GHSEN) seeks to provide an internet-based venue to bring together individuals and institutions from across the globe dedicated to advancing homeland security education as evidenced in many disciplines and areas.

As an integral part of the GHSEN the electronic Journal of the Global Homeland Security Education Network (JGHSEN) is being established to allow for the publication of innovative contributions in the examination of transnational, comparative, and cooperative efforts to ensure and advance homeland security. The GHSEN is a product of the work of a consortium of universities under a EU-U.S. Atlantis grant (P116J090056) from the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, (FIPSE), U.S. Department of Education.

Four partner institutions are involved in this research project: in terms of the European Union these are Northumbria University (the United Kingdom), and Linnaeus University (Sweden). For the U.S. the partner institutions are the University of Central Missouri and Virginia Commonwealth University.

Academic Papers

Transnational & Comparative Curricular Offerings in U.S. Post-Baccalaureate Programs: Benchmarking a Link from the U.S. to the EU in Homeland Security Education

Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management: Vol. 8: Iss. 2, Article 13.

Donald H. Wallace, University of Central Missouri
Craig McLean, Northumbria University
William H. Parrish, Virginia Commonwealth University
Sarah Soppitt, Northumbria University
Daniel Silander, Linnaeus University

Abstract: It is vital that U.S. academic institutions pay heed to the important global challenges that HS academics and practitioners must face. This article finds in an overview of the development of prescriptions for curricular outcomes and competencies for homeland security education in the U.S. that there has been little emphasis on curricular goals in the U.S. of the transnational and global application of homeland security strategies and operations. Transatlantic links in homeland security education between U.S. universities and their counterparts in Europe will be hampered by the virtual lack of explicit academic programs in this field in that continent. An examination of program goals and curricular offerings in U.S. post-baccalaureate programs indicates a modest attempt to provide students some grounding in transnational and global applications of homeland security strategies and operations.

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Benchmarking Homeland Security Education in the EU and the US

Paper Presented to the Fifth Annual Homeland Defense and Security Education Summit, 11 March 2011, University of Maryland.

Donald H. Wallace, University of Central Missouri
Craig McLean, Northumbria University
William H. Parrish, Virginia Commonwealth University
Sarah Soppitt, Northumbria University
Daniel Silander, Linnaeus University

Abstract: Researchers from the University of Central Missouri, Virginia Commonwealth University, Northumbria University (United Kingdom) and Linnaeus University (Sweden) joined for a policy oriented measures project funded by a grant from the EU-US Atlantis Program. This project has been examining Homeland Security academic provision within the US and EU. The study’s goals focus on developing benchmarks and assessing core areas within the Homeland Security related curricula. This paper will present preliminary findings that examine definitional and conceptual differences on Homeland Security provision both between the EU and US and within these two regions. Amidst frequent calls for closing the gap between security services and academia, these findings could have an impact on establishing specific benchmarks for “homeland security” specific academic programs. In the US context these academic programs reflect a post 9-11 government restructuring that has not occurred to the same extent in either the governmental or academic institutions within the EU.

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Developing a Transatlantic Understanding in Homeland Security Academic Education Provision

Paper presented to the ISA Annual Convention, 16 March 2011.

Craig McLean, Northumbria University
Donald H. Wallace, University of Central Missouri
Sarah Soppitt, Northumbria University
William H. Parrish, Virginia Commonwealth University
Daniel Silander, Linnaeus University
Adele Irving, Northumbria University

Abstract: At the dawn of the 21st century it is widely recognised that transnational terrorism can pose a major challenge to the security of nation-state. To manage this challenge, multi-agency collective efforts, beyond those at the domestic level, are needed. Though since 2001 there has been an invigoration of national security efforts, any multinational security efforts will be successful only if there is a shared understanding of the domestic and multilateral institutional architectures, both existing and needed, to combat terrorism and respond to man-made or natural catastrophic events The academic communities on both sides of the Atlantic have taken notice of the need for academic research and instruction in a Homeland Security (HS) based curriculum, but have responded differently to how this might best be achieved. US universities have largely developed entire HS academic programmes, but this has not been replicated in the European Union. Building upon a paper delivered at the 2010 ISA annual convention, this paper will examine the data that has been generated for a research project funded by the EU/US Atlantis Programme. This project analyses HS education provision in the US and EU, and will compare curricular coverage of comparative and international issues in homeland security.
 
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Benchmarking Homeland Security Education

Paper Presented to the Euro-American Conference for Academic Disciplines, 21-24 June 2011, Prague, Czech Republic

Donald H. Wallace, University of Central Missouri
Craig McLean, Northumbria University
William H. Parrish, Virginia Commonwealth University
Sarah Soppitt, Northumbria University
Daniel Silander, Linnaeus University

Abstract: Researchers from the University of Central Missouri, Virginia Commonwealth University, Northumbria University (United Kingdom) and Linnaeus University (Sweden) joined for a policy oriented measures project funded by a grant from the EU-US Atlantis Program. This project has been examining Homeland Security academic provision within the US and EU. The study’s goals focus on developing benchmarks and assessing core areas within the Homeland Security related curricula. This paper will present preliminary findings that examine definitional and conceptual differences on Homeland Security provision both between the EU and US and within these two regions. Amidst frequent calls for closing the gap between security services and academia, these findings could have an impact on establishing specific benchmarks for “homeland security” specific academic programs. In the US context these academic programs reflect a post 9-11 government restructuring that has not occurred to the same extent in either the governmental or academic institutions within the EU.

Journal of the Global Homeland Security Education Network

The Journal
of the Global Homeland Security Education Network

The goal of the Journal of the Global Homeland Security Education Network (JGHSEN) is to allow for the publication of innovative contributions in the examination of transnational, comparative, and cooperative international efforts to ensure and advance homeland security. The JGHSEN will serve as a venue to allow for academics, researchers, and practitioners to publish through this electronic journal articles describing relevant research or practice.
 
This Journal has evolved out of the Atlantis Policy Project on Homeland Security Education at the International Level  (hereinafter the Project) entails the assessment of the state of homeland security (hereinafter HS) education in the US and Europe.  The Project was made possible by research support granted by the US Government and European Commission.[1] Four partner institutions are involved in this research project: in terms of the European Union these are Northumbria University (the United Kingdom), and Linaeus University (Sweden).  For the United States the partner institutions are the University of Central Missouri and Virginia Commonwealth University.

The terrorist attacks on the US in 2001 and the subsequent attacks on European countries such as the UK and Spain prompted both sides of the Atlantic to reinvigorate their respective efforts to ensure homeland security (HS) and combat terrorism, however, with differing approaches.  The US embarked on a wholesale reorganization of its domestic security and border protection institutions. By contrast European countries largely preferred to work within their existing institutional architectures to combat terrorism and respond to other security challenges and disasters, both natural and man-made. The research of this Atlantis Policy Project determined that the divergence in government-led efforts has been replicated within academia in the US and the Europe.  There is now a plethora of HS-nominal programs being offered by US universities, whereas this has not been the development within Europe.  Very few European academic institutions offer a dedicated program in HS. The approach taken in the U.S. appears to be that the institutionalization of HS must rely on academia to create the professional who will make the world a more secure and safer place.  The inference that might be taken from this U.S. direction is that Europe may be in danger of losing the necessary level of focus and understanding for ensuring security of its homeland, since it has not enlisted its academic structure in a process of institutionalizing HS. 

The JGHSEN will use an independent double-blind-peer-reviewed process for selection.

There is a size restriction of 3,500 to 5,000 words for the published manuscripts.

For details on formatting styles please click here.

For detailed information on the Journal and submitting manuscripts, please email the journal editors:
craig.mclean@northumbria.ac.uk and wallace@ucmo.edu
 
Issue 1 now available, DOWNLOAD

 

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