Dr Tanja Bueltmann

Principal Lecturer in History; Director of International Development and Recruitment
Department: Humanities

Tanja is an expert in diaspora and migration history, especially the history of ethnic associational culture.

ADSS Tanja Bueltmann Staffprofile 255Tanja studied at the universities of Bielefeld and Edinburgh for her MA in British Cultural Studies, History and Sociology. With a strong background in Scottish History, she then moved to New Zealand to pursue her doctoral research on the country's Scottish immigrant community. Funded by the New Zealand government, Tanja completed her PhD at the end of 2008. Returning to Europe in early 2009, she was then appointed to join the History team at Northumbria as senior research assistant, taking up a Lectureship in History in 2010.

+44 (0)191 227 4761

Qualifications

PhD, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, 2009; MA, Bielefeld University, Germany, 2005; FRHistS, FHEA

Research Themes and Scholarly Interests

Tanja's research interests are in wider British World history, especially the cultural and social history of Scottish, English and German immigrant communities. She is particularly interested in the communities' associational life in North America, the Antipodes and parts of Asia.

Tanja is Principal Investigator of the project 'European, Ethnic and Expatriate: A Longitudinal Comparison of British and German Social Networking and Associational Formations in Modern-day Asia'. Starting in October 2013, the project is funded by the ESRC for three years through a Future Research Leaders grant. Follow @clioexpat on Twitter for updates

http://www.ethnicandexpatriate.co.uk/


Tanja is Co-Investigator of the AHRC funded project 'Locating the Hidden Diaspora: The English in North America in Transatlantic Perspective, 1760-1950'. Her research as part of the project concentrates on exploring the diverse forms of associationalism among the English. English associational activity has been overlooked, but it amounted to a sustained demonstration of ethnic consciousness by any normal measure: the English planted ethnic markers in the form of societies very much like the Scots, Irish or Germans.

http://www.englishdiaspora.co.uk/


Tanja's interest in the English Diaspora stems from here work on the Scots abroad and Scottish associations in particular. In 2010, Tanja was awarded a Small Research Grant from the British Academy for her project 'Ethnicity, Associationalism and Civility: The Scots in Singapore and Hong Kong in Comparative Perspective'. Please also visit Tanja's Scottish Diaspora Blog or follow @scotsdiaspora on Twitter.

http://thescottishdiaspora.co.uk/

Current/Recent Projects

2013: ESRC Future Research Leaders Grant

2013: Research Grant from the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland

2012: Visiting Fellowship for 2013 with grant at the Humanities Research Centre, Australian National University

2012: Grant from the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation

2011: AHRC Research Grant (Standard Route) as Co-I with Don MacRaild (PI) and David Gleeson (Co-I)

2010: British Academy Small Research Grant

Key Publications

Clubbing Together: Ethnicity, Civility and Formal Sociability in the Scottish Diaspora to 1930 (Liverpool, 2014). 

[with Andrew Hinson and Graeme Morton], The Scottish Diaspora (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2013).

[as editor with David Gleeson and Don MacRaild], Locating the English Diaspora, 1500-2010 (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2012).

'Ethnizität und organisierte Geselligkeit: Das Assoziationswesen deutscher Migranten in Neuseeland im mittleren und späten 19. Jahrhundert', Historische Zeitschrift, 295:3 (2012), pp. 660-89.

[with Don MacRaild], 'Globalising St George: English Associations in the Anglo-World to the 1930s', Journal of Global History, 7 (2012), pp. 79-105.

Scottish Ethnicity and the Making of New Zealand Society, 1850 to 1930 (Scottish Historical Review Monograph Series, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011). * shortlisted for the Saltire Society Scottish History Book of the Year and Scottish Research Book of the Year Awards

'Manly Games, Athletic Sports and the Commodification of Scottish Identity: Caledonian Gatherings in New Zealand to 1915', Scottish Historical Review 89, no 2 (2010), pp. 224-47.

'"No Colonists are more Imbued with their National Sympathies than Scotchmen": The Nation as an Analytical Tool in the Study of Migrant Communities', New Zealand Journal of History 43, 2 (2009), pp. 169-181.


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