MU4001 - Millennium of Music

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What will I learn on this module?

This course will open your ears to a wide range of repertoire from plainchant to contemporary Western art music. The notions of ‘Classical’ or ‘Western Art Music’ are problematic, not least because they encompass music composed over more than a millennium. You will be exposed to a broad range of music, much of which will be new to you. You will explore some of the principal musical developments from about 900AD to the present day, looking at how music was created and preserved through notation and, later, recorded sound. Although much of the repertoire you will be studying is now heard in concert hall and recital, you will discover the contexts for which it was originally intended, and the function that it played in society at large. This course will give you a clear and broad grasp of the shape of musical, cultural and intellectual history alongside more detailed studies of individual musical works, whilst engaging with questions of how histories of music are constructed. The module will provide a framework to which you will be able to relate more detailed and specialist studies of music.

We will begin with the relatively familiar (Beethoven and his time), and move forwards chronologically to the present day. Then, after Christmas, we will move backwards from Beethoven, ending in the Middle Ages.

How will I learn on this module?

During the course, you will be given guided reading and listening each week which will give you an overview of a particular topic; you will be able to track your progress through regular in-class assignments. The lectures will give you practice in listening skills, developing a facility for absorbing information delivered orally and an ability to interact with speakers. The lectures will be more narrowly focused than the reading. Seminars provide a flexible time for student presentations (individual and group work) and discussion. You will be given individual advice on your essay in a short tutorial, and the opportunity to receive oral feedback on your written work.

How will I be supported academically on this module?

Your academic development will be supported through engagement with your peers, academic tutors, and programme leaders. Academic support is provided through seminar discussions and optional essay tutorials which allow specific issues to be addressed and to promote progress in academic development. The module tutor will be accessible within publicised office hours and via email. Your peers will provide you will a collaborative learning environment, and your programme leader will guide you through the requirements and expectations of your course. You will also be supported through individual engagement with the academic literature, lectures, and resources available on the eLearning Portal. Formative feedback will be on-going throughout seminar activities and through regular in-class assessment tasks.

What will I be expected to read on this module?

All modules at Northumbria include a range of reading materials that students are expected to engage with. The reading list for this module can be found at: http://readinglists.northumbria.ac.uk
(Reading List service online guide for academic staff this containing contact details for the Reading List team – http://library.northumbria.ac.uk/readinglists)

What will I be expected to achieve?

Knowledge & Understanding:
1. You will demonstrate knowledge of a wide repertoire of music from different periods, an understanding of some of the main stylistic developments and an awareness of the function played by music in various contexts.

Intellectual / Professional skills & abilities:
2. You will be able to make effective use of written and aural sources of information in the construction of an argument, making appropriate acknowledgement of them.

Personal Values Attributes (Global / Cultural awareness, Ethics, Curiosity) (PVA):

3. You will demonstrate curiosity through an open-minded engagement with unfamiliar musical sounds, concepts, repertoires and practices.

4. You will demonstrate a capacity to monitor and assess your own progress and an ability to respond positively to feedback of others.

5. You will demonstrate an ability to manage your time, and to work effectively with others and on your own.

How will I be assessed?

1. FORMATIVE: In-class assessments and preparatory assignments. These will take a variety of forms, depending on the topic, and may include short listening tests; short tests of knowledge; individual presentations; group presentations. See MLOs 1, 3, 4, 5. Feedback will vary according to the task. It may include, for example, annotation to a test script, a brief report on an oral presentation, oral feedback to the cohort, or a combination of these.

2. Essay 1 (50%), submitted at end of Semester 1. A 2,000-word essay that tests students’ ability to make use of what they have learned in lectures and seminars, and to undertake their own research on a topic. MLO 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

3. Essay 2 (50%), submitted at end of Semester 2. A 2,000-word essay that tests students’ ability to make use of what they have learned in lectures and seminars, and to undertake their own research on a topic. MLO 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Feedback on essays comprises annotations to the script and a short report, plus an opportunity to go over your work with the marker in an individual tutorial.

Pre-requisite(s)

N/A

Co-requisite(s)

N/A

Module abstract

The notion of ‘Classical’ music is problematic since the word is often used for music composed over more than a millennium. This module will open your ears to a vast range of music from plainchant to contemporary Western art music, much of which will be new to you. We will look at how music was created and preserved through notation (and, later, recorded sound). Although you may think of this music as belonging to the concert hall, you will discover the contexts for which it was originally intended, and the function that it played in society at large. The module is intended to give you a broad knowledge of music history as a framework in to which you will be able to slot more specialist studies later in the degree. You will be guided in your listening and reading each week, which will form the foundation for more specialist lectures. Seminars will involve a range of activities, including individual and group presentations.

Course info

UCAS Code W320

Credits 20

Level of Study Undergraduate

Mode of Study 3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department Humanities

Location City Campus, Northumbria University

City Newcastle

Start September 2020

Fee Information

Module Information

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