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Biotechnology is one of the most rapidly growing fields within applied sciences, having applications from the diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions, through to the enhancement of food production. Due to the potential impact on human life, the importance of biotechnology is currently very high in both the public and scientific agendas.

The course has been specifically designed to enhance your career prospects if you are working in industry or in academic research. The flexible structure of the course will enable you to select modules and a project of relevance to your own personal, professional and academic interests. Great care is taken to ensure that the course provides knowledge and skills, and uses tools, techniques and methods which are immediately useful to employers, both in the UK and overseas. You will develop transferable skills during the course with the emphasis on personal time management, problem solving abilities and life-long independent learning.

This programme is delivered entirely at MDIS in Singapore and is offered as Full Time mode of study only.

If you would like to apply or for further information please visit the MDIS website. For any specific queries relating directly to Northumbria please contact tne@northumbria.ac.uk.

Biotechnology is one of the most rapidly growing fields within applied sciences, having applications from the diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions, through to the enhancement of food production. Due to the potential impact on human life, the importance of biotechnology is currently very high in both the public and scientific agendas.

The course has been specifically designed to enhance your career prospects if you are working in industry or in academic research. The flexible structure of the course will enable you to select modules and a project of relevance to your own personal, professional and academic interests. Great care is taken to ensure that the course provides knowledge and skills, and uses tools, techniques and methods which are immediately useful to employers, both in the UK and overseas. You will develop transferable skills during the course with the emphasis on personal time management, problem solving abilities and life-long independent learning.

This programme is delivered entirely at MDIS in Singapore and is offered as Full Time mode of study only.

If you would like to apply or for further information please visit the MDIS website. For any specific queries relating directly to Northumbria please contact tne@northumbria.ac.uk.

Course Information

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
36 months

Location
Various Locations

City
Newcastle

Start
November or April

Fee Information

Module Information

Entry Requirements 2021/22

Standard Entry

For information on entry requirements please visit the MDIS website

Entry Requirements 2022/23

Standard Entry

For information on entry requirements please visit the MDIS website

If you'd like to receive news and information from us in the future about the course or finance then please complete the below form

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

BF0600 -

Plant Biotechnology (Core,10 Credits)

Plant Biotechnology

Plant Biotechnology is one of the most fascinating, and fast moving fields of biological science in current times. In addition, it provides some of the most hotly debated issues world wide: hardly a week passes in which GM-crops, do not make their way into our newspapers or on the television news.

But what are these crops, and what is the technology behind them? In this module, we will explore the often complicated technology that enables genes from different organisms to be expressed in plants. Moreover, we will discuss the potential of genetically modified (GM) plants to provide solutions for current problems. In doing this, we will focus on agricultural crops.

Plant biotechnology is, as the word suggests, a technology - nothing more and nothing less. However, the problems addressed with GM-technology are usually of an ecological and/or socio-economical nature. If we want to understand the impact of GM-technology and participate in the debate around it, we need to have background knowledge and insight in the problems for which GM-technology may (or may not) provide a solution.

This module is not meant to develop students into either "pro-GM" or " against-GM" .Plant biotechnology and GM plants in particular, are complex - both concerning their background, and their potential place in our world. It is up to us, as biologists, to at least convey that message of complexity.

In this module we will make use of lectures, practicals and tutorials. In most of the lectures, there will be sessions in which students will be asked to work independently or in small groups on a problem for some time.

The assessment of this module is by coursework (50%) and exam ( 50%))

More information

BF0604 -

Investigative Microbiology (Core,10 Credits)

Food spoilage is a serious problem for the food processor as well as the food retailer and the consumer. This module offers the opportunity to investigate a specific aspect of food spoilage concerning contamination of commercially available fruit juices by various strains of yeast. The investigation will take into account nutritional content of the juices, any additives used in their production and various storage conditions of the food product. Assessment takes the form of a practical investigation of a spoilage problem.

More information

BF0606 -

Animal Biotechnology (Core,10 Credits)

Research within the field of animal biotechnology is fast moving and giving rise to an increasing range of interesting and important new applications; For example the impressive [and still expanding] list of species which have had their genomes completely sequenced, now allows new applications such as data mining and comparative genomics techniques. This is coupled with the re-emergence and re- evaluation of the use of animals, such as maggots and leeches, in the treatment and management of disease, a field known as 'biotherapy'.

This module will be of interest to students wishing to acquire an understanding of the role that animals play in biotechnology research and the applications that result, in addition to the impact which biotechnology has on animals. Core topics will include the theory and practice of cell culture and recombinant DNA techniques and a range of applications will be drawn from current literature to reflect recent advances in research which are of widespread interest and/or importance; for example uses and applications of transgenics/ cloned animals; problem solving using bioinformatics resources etc.

The module consists of lectures and practicals, including ICT workshops, in addition to independent and directed learning. Students will be assessed by coursework (including a formative component) and examination.

More information

BF0610 -

Current Topics in Biotechnology (Core,10 Credits)

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of current developments in biotechnology. Topics covered in the directed learning will reflect novel areas or developments in particular disciplines of biotechnology and the research interests of the teaching team. Necessarily the former will mean that topics may change year on year as new developments in biotechnology emerge. Delivery will be largely in a lecture/seminar format to encourage students to discuss topics and develop their skills in critical evaluation of new and emerging areas in biotechnology. The formal exam will assess factual knowledge and the ability to synthesize material provided in the directed learning with that in the literature to produce a coherent and informed discussion. Students will be formatively assessed on their ability to critically evaluate how "hot topics" in biotechnology are reported by the media and how this impacts on the public's understanding of science.

More information

BF0611 -

Applied Bioinformatics (Core,10 Credits)

Bioinformatics has been instrumental in the success of the human genome project, and other genome projects. The vast amount of sequence data produced requires a number of computer-based tools to manage and analyse information in the various databases. These can be interrogated to compare unknown to known sequences, mutated sequences to normal sequences and to attempt predictions of protein structure and function in novel coding sequences. This unit will be of interest to students wishing to gain advanced understanding of these bioinformatics procedures. The emphasis will be the use of these tools in biotechnology, biomedical sciences, biology, genetics and chemistry. There will be ample opportunity for students to gain practical experience in the use of these tools using guided exercises, directed learning and independent learning.
Theoretical aspects of the syllabus will be assessed by examination or equivalent, practical aspects will be assessed formatively.

More information

BF0614 -

Bioethics (Core,20 Credits)

Hand in hand with scientific and technological advances come new, and often unforeseen, ethical dilemmas and associated issues. For example the initial euphoria surrounding the development of kidney dialysis machines in the 1940s was short-lived due to the ethics of 'selection' which quickly emerged following their introduction: Who should get access to this new and expensive treatment? [and] Who should decide? More contemporary examples include controversial issues surrounding the ethical development and use of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) such as 'Golden Rice'. In addition ongoing 'classical' ethical debates, such as the rights of animals, need to be constantly evaluated along with changing perspectives within society. For example, (how?) can you resolve the conflict between (i) a now widespread recognition that the use of animals to test cosmetics is wrong, and (ii) a new ability and need to develop disease models by manipulation of an animals genome?

This module aims to raise students' awareness of a range of ethical dilemmas and issues that stem from the impact of science and technology on society. The module demonstrates ethics methodologies which can be used to make or defend ethical decisions or recommendations. The module requires no previous knowledge of bioethics.

The module consists of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops in addition to independent and directed learning. Students will be assessed by coursework and are required to formatively criticise peers work

More information

BF0616 -

Biological and Food Sciences Project (Core,30 Credits)

The project module provides final year students with an opportunity to design and carry out an extended individual research project. With guidance and support from an appointed supervisor, projects will include development of research skills and discussion of results as well as an opportunity to compose a written report in which an evaluation of the relevant literature and research findings are presented. The project may encompass laboratory- based, computer-based, questionnaire/ survey- based or dry; theoretically-based, methods, but all will be assessed by a written report bringing out the key aspects of each project.

Assessment is via the final Written Report (75% of total mark) and a Supervisors Report (25% of total mark). The Written Report would vary with subject area but would typically be within the range of 4000 - 7000 words. The Supervisor's Report will assess students attitude, initiative, planning, self- management and organisation, data collection and/or practical skills (including safe & ethical working & time management), recording of data and on-going reference to supporting literature in a laboratory/ log book.

Within this module there is a clear emphasis on independent study which should inform the development of the project as the research progresses.

More information

BS0603 -

Analytical Methods and Applied Genetics (Core,20 Credits)

This module will provide students with in-depth knowledge of a range of biomedical techniques used in the investigation and diagnosis of disease. Students will be introduced to biosensors, spectroscopy (e.g. nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectroscopy, flow cytometry), separation techniques (e.g. capillary electrophoresis, 2 dimensional electrophoresis, advanced chromatographic seperations) and advanced molecular genetics techniques, together with their biomedical applications. The importance of the Human Genome Project will be discussed and students will be encouraged to consider its ethical, legal and social implications. The use of bioinformatics in Biomedical Sciences will also be investigated both from a research and diagnostic point of view.
The teaching of this module will be by a combination of lectures and practical classes, with assessment taking the form of an online examination for each aspect of the module i.e. one for Analytical Methods and one for Applied Genetics.
On completion of this module students will be able to review the principles of analytical and molecular genetics techniques used in bioscience and additionally be able to critically evaluate and appraise their application and contribution to the diagnosis, understanding and treatment of human diseases.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

BF0600 -

Plant Biotechnology (Core,10 Credits)

Plant Biotechnology

Plant Biotechnology is one of the most fascinating, and fast moving fields of biological science in current times. In addition, it provides some of the most hotly debated issues world wide: hardly a week passes in which GM-crops, do not make their way into our newspapers or on the television news.

But what are these crops, and what is the technology behind them? In this module, we will explore the often complicated technology that enables genes from different organisms to be expressed in plants. Moreover, we will discuss the potential of genetically modified (GM) plants to provide solutions for current problems. In doing this, we will focus on agricultural crops.

Plant biotechnology is, as the word suggests, a technology - nothing more and nothing less. However, the problems addressed with GM-technology are usually of an ecological and/or socio-economical nature. If we want to understand the impact of GM-technology and participate in the debate around it, we need to have background knowledge and insight in the problems for which GM-technology may (or may not) provide a solution.

This module is not meant to develop students into either "pro-GM" or " against-GM" .Plant biotechnology and GM plants in particular, are complex - both concerning their background, and their potential place in our world. It is up to us, as biologists, to at least convey that message of complexity.

In this module we will make use of lectures, practicals and tutorials. In most of the lectures, there will be sessions in which students will be asked to work independently or in small groups on a problem for some time.

The assessment of this module is by coursework (50%) and exam ( 50%))

More information

BF0604 -

Investigative Microbiology (Core,10 Credits)

Food spoilage is a serious problem for the food processor as well as the food retailer and the consumer. This module offers the opportunity to investigate a specific aspect of food spoilage concerning contamination of commercially available fruit juices by various strains of yeast. The investigation will take into account nutritional content of the juices, any additives used in their production and various storage conditions of the food product. Assessment takes the form of a practical investigation of a spoilage problem.

More information

BF0606 -

Animal Biotechnology (Core,10 Credits)

Research within the field of animal biotechnology is fast moving and giving rise to an increasing range of interesting and important new applications; For example the impressive [and still expanding] list of species which have had their genomes completely sequenced, now allows new applications such as data mining and comparative genomics techniques. This is coupled with the re-emergence and re- evaluation of the use of animals, such as maggots and leeches, in the treatment and management of disease, a field known as 'biotherapy'.

This module will be of interest to students wishing to acquire an understanding of the role that animals play in biotechnology research and the applications that result, in addition to the impact which biotechnology has on animals. Core topics will include the theory and practice of cell culture and recombinant DNA techniques and a range of applications will be drawn from current literature to reflect recent advances in research which are of widespread interest and/or importance; for example uses and applications of transgenics/ cloned animals; problem solving using bioinformatics resources etc.

The module consists of lectures and practicals, including ICT workshops, in addition to independent and directed learning. Students will be assessed by coursework (including a formative component) and examination.

More information

BF0610 -

Current Topics in Biotechnology (Core,10 Credits)

This module aims to provide students with an understanding of current developments in biotechnology. Topics covered in the directed learning will reflect novel areas or developments in particular disciplines of biotechnology and the research interests of the teaching team. Necessarily the former will mean that topics may change year on year as new developments in biotechnology emerge. Delivery will be largely in a lecture/seminar format to encourage students to discuss topics and develop their skills in critical evaluation of new and emerging areas in biotechnology. The formal exam will assess factual knowledge and the ability to synthesize material provided in the directed learning with that in the literature to produce a coherent and informed discussion. Students will be formatively assessed on their ability to critically evaluate how "hot topics" in biotechnology are reported by the media and how this impacts on the public's understanding of science.

More information

BF0611 -

Applied Bioinformatics (Core,10 Credits)

Bioinformatics has been instrumental in the success of the human genome project, and other genome projects. The vast amount of sequence data produced requires a number of computer-based tools to manage and analyse information in the various databases. These can be interrogated to compare unknown to known sequences, mutated sequences to normal sequences and to attempt predictions of protein structure and function in novel coding sequences. This unit will be of interest to students wishing to gain advanced understanding of these bioinformatics procedures. The emphasis will be the use of these tools in biotechnology, biomedical sciences, biology, genetics and chemistry. There will be ample opportunity for students to gain practical experience in the use of these tools using guided exercises, directed learning and independent learning.
Theoretical aspects of the syllabus will be assessed by examination or equivalent, practical aspects will be assessed formatively.

More information

BF0614 -

Bioethics (Core,20 Credits)

Hand in hand with scientific and technological advances come new, and often unforeseen, ethical dilemmas and associated issues. For example the initial euphoria surrounding the development of kidney dialysis machines in the 1940s was short-lived due to the ethics of 'selection' which quickly emerged following their introduction: Who should get access to this new and expensive treatment? [and] Who should decide? More contemporary examples include controversial issues surrounding the ethical development and use of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) such as 'Golden Rice'. In addition ongoing 'classical' ethical debates, such as the rights of animals, need to be constantly evaluated along with changing perspectives within society. For example, (how?) can you resolve the conflict between (i) a now widespread recognition that the use of animals to test cosmetics is wrong, and (ii) a new ability and need to develop disease models by manipulation of an animals genome?

This module aims to raise students' awareness of a range of ethical dilemmas and issues that stem from the impact of science and technology on society. The module demonstrates ethics methodologies which can be used to make or defend ethical decisions or recommendations. The module requires no previous knowledge of bioethics.

The module consists of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops in addition to independent and directed learning. Students will be assessed by coursework and are required to formatively criticise peers work

More information

BF0616 -

Biological and Food Sciences Project (Core,30 Credits)

The project module provides final year students with an opportunity to design and carry out an extended individual research project. With guidance and support from an appointed supervisor, projects will include development of research skills and discussion of results as well as an opportunity to compose a written report in which an evaluation of the relevant literature and research findings are presented. The project may encompass laboratory- based, computer-based, questionnaire/ survey- based or dry; theoretically-based, methods, but all will be assessed by a written report bringing out the key aspects of each project.

Assessment is via the final Written Report (75% of total mark) and a Supervisors Report (25% of total mark). The Written Report would vary with subject area but would typically be within the range of 4000 - 7000 words. The Supervisor's Report will assess students attitude, initiative, planning, self- management and organisation, data collection and/or practical skills (including safe & ethical working & time management), recording of data and on-going reference to supporting literature in a laboratory/ log book.

Within this module there is a clear emphasis on independent study which should inform the development of the project as the research progresses.

More information

BS0603 -

Analytical Methods and Applied Genetics (Core,20 Credits)

This module will provide students with in-depth knowledge of a range of biomedical techniques used in the investigation and diagnosis of disease. Students will be introduced to biosensors, spectroscopy (e.g. nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectroscopy, flow cytometry), separation techniques (e.g. capillary electrophoresis, 2 dimensional electrophoresis, advanced chromatographic seperations) and advanced molecular genetics techniques, together with their biomedical applications. The importance of the Human Genome Project will be discussed and students will be encouraged to consider its ethical, legal and social implications. The use of bioinformatics in Biomedical Sciences will also be investigated both from a research and diagnostic point of view.
The teaching of this module will be by a combination of lectures and practical classes, with assessment taking the form of an online examination for each aspect of the module i.e. one for Analytical Methods and one for Applied Genetics.
On completion of this module students will be able to review the principles of analytical and molecular genetics techniques used in bioscience and additionally be able to critically evaluate and appraise their application and contribution to the diagnosis, understanding and treatment of human diseases.

More information

Any Questions?

Our admissions team will be happy to help. They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901.

Contact Details for Applicants:

tne@northumbria.ac.uk

All information on this course page is accurate at the time of viewing.

Courses starting in 2021 are offered as a mix of face to face and online learning. We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to flex accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with additional restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors, potentially to a full online offer, should further restrictions be deemed necessary in future.

Our online activity will be delivered through Blackboard Ultra, enabling collaboration, connection and engagement with materials and people.

 

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.


Your Learning Experience find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions - northumbria.ac.uk/terms
Fees and Funding - northumbria.ac.uk/fees
Admissions Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy
Admissions Complaints Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/complaints




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