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Are you seeking to enter the criminal justice or community justice sectors? Want to work with drug action teams or in the voluntary and charitable sector? Our postgraduate Criminology degree will develop your skills.

The MA Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northumbria University is a dynamic course that offers a flexible mode of study. You will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of the key themes, issues and political debates concerning crime, crime control and criminal and social justice in the UK and globally.

Learn from an exciting, vibrant and dynamic team of scholars who are high quality teachers and internationally renowned experts within their subject. All of the Criminology staff team have doctorates or extensive professional experience in the Criminology/criminal justice sector.

Equipped with excellent practical, communication, and transferable skills, postgraduate Criminology will leave you well placed for a range of roles including drug action teams, law enforcement, research, community safety, local authority, voluntary and charitable sectors. Book an open day to learn more about studying at Northumbria.

On graduating, you will have developed advanced written and oral communication skills and the ability to apply Criminologist concepts to a wide range of practical issues.

You will be able to demonstrate research skills which are valuable in many professions and show that you are someone who can apply independent critical thinking and judgement.

Previous students are enjoying successful careers in the criminal justice and community justice sectors, drug action teams, law enforcement agencies, voluntary and charitable sectors, crime analysis, research, local government, community safety, youth justice and the prison system. You also have the opportunity to continue your academic studies at PhD level.

Course Information

Level of Study
Postgraduate

Mode of Study
16 months full-time
1 other options available

Department
Social Sciences

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Fees
Fee Information

Modules
Module Information

Discover more / Explore Northumbria University

Take a look at what Northumbria has to offer and discover what studying with us can do for you.

Entry Requirements 2024/25

Standard Entry

A second-class honours degree in a social science related subject area, an equivalent professional qualification and / or relevant experience will be considered as entry requirements. Degree and non-degree applicants will be asked to complete a written application and may be invited for interview before admission.

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have one of the following English language qualifications with grades as shown below.

    • A British Council International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of 6.5 (or above) with a minimum score in each component of Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking of 5.5
    • Pearson Academic score of 62 (or above) with a minimum score in each component of Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking of 51

    The University also accepts many other English language qualifications and if you have any questions about our English Language requirements please contact the International Admissions Office and we will be glad to a

Fees and Funding 2024/25 Entry

Full UK Fee: TBC

Full EU Fee: TBC

Full International Fee: TBC



Scholarships and Discounts

Discover More about Fees, Scholarships and other Funding options for UK, EU and International applicants.

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

How to Apply

Please use the Apply Now button at the top of this page to submit your application.

Certain applications may need to be submitted via an external application system, such as UCAS, Lawcabs or DfE Apply.

The Apply Now button will redirect you to the relevant website if this is the case.

You can find further application advice, such as what to include in your application and what happens after you apply, on our Admissions Hub Admissions | Northumbria University



Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

CR7001 -

Research Methods for Global Criminology (Core,30 Credits)

This module is designed to ensure that you are equipped to undertake social science research at postgraduate level, regardless of the extent to which you have previously studied research methods. After some consideration of the contribution of research to understanding issues in the social sciences, you will be taken through the different stages of a research project, using a range of exercises to show the practical questions that can affect each stage. You will consider also some of the challenges that arise in seeking to undertake research into Criminological issues in an international / comparative context.

More information

CR7002 -

Comparative Penal Policy (Core,30 Credits)

On this module you will gain a detailed and contemporary understanding of criminal justice debates relating to custody and community based punishments. You will analyse penal policy and its relationship to wider issues associated with economic, social, cultural and political developments in an international context. Through engaging with historical and contemporary literature and research you will develop your knowledge of penal policy, as well as the underlying philosophies of punishment. Additionally you will develop an understanding as to why some western societies have adopted a more 'managerial' approach towards criminal justice, including the development of 'risk-based' and ‘deficits’ models of interventions, versus ‘strengths based’ approaches favoured in other jurisdictions. The module will also consider the ethics and role of the private sector in criminal justice systems, both prison and also community based sanctions.

More information

CR7003 -

International Crime, Policing and Security (Core,30 Credits)

You will understand contemporary perspectives on crime, harm, policing, and security in their global context and how these are related to wider process of globalisation and economic, social, cultural, and political developments that operate at transnational levels. You will develop foundational knowledge of governance, risk and security and how criminology operates beyond the nation state. Critical debates about the architecture of international policing, global crime investigation and the pluralisation of international policing and security are explored. These are related to challenges including transnational organised crime, cybercrime, state crime and strategies to countering these threats. You will learn how cases of global crime and harm provide an alternative perspective on the globalisation thesis and underline the links between local, regional, national, and global dimensions of policing and security.

More information

CR7004 -

Social Exclusion and Victimisation in a Global Context (Core,30 Credits)

On this module you will explore the issues of social exclusion and victimisation in the UK and internationally. You will discover and challenge the theoretical underpinnings of these concepts and their manifestations in contemporary society. The module will therefore begin by exploring the two concepts, their links to each other, as well as their relationship to related concepts (such as harm and vulnerability, inequality and injustice). The module will then move on to examine case studies in depth such as poverty and homelessness, violence against women, and sex work. Throughout the module, you will consider the ways in the concepts of social exclusion and victimisation have been framed within the policy process and public debate in the UK and beyond, and how such framings have influenced the nature of public policy.

More information

SO7002 -

Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core,60 Credits)

In this module you will demonstrate advanced and independent critical thinking skills about the research process and a specific, substantial topic of your choice. In doing so you will develop robust, coherent and substantiated, advanced academic arguments in an identifiable area of enquiry. There are a number of options for the dissertation: literature-based, empirical, or placement-based dissertations. In formulating, research, and writing your dissertation you will be guided by your dissertation supervisor. The dissertation is the culmination of your taught experience and will enable you to deploy the skills develop during the taught programme.

More information

YE7001 -

Academic Language Skills for Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Effective reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.
• Discussing ethical issues in research, and analysing results.
• Describing bias and limitations of research.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

CR7001 -

Research Methods for Global Criminology (Core,30 Credits)

This module is designed to ensure that you are equipped to undertake social science research at postgraduate level, regardless of the extent to which you have previously studied research methods. After some consideration of the contribution of research to understanding issues in the social sciences, you will be taken through the different stages of a research project, using a range of exercises to show the practical questions that can affect each stage. You will consider also some of the challenges that arise in seeking to undertake research into Criminological issues in an international / comparative context.

More information

CR7002 -

Comparative Penal Policy (Core,30 Credits)

On this module you will gain a detailed and contemporary understanding of criminal justice debates relating to custody and community based punishments. You will analyse penal policy and its relationship to wider issues associated with economic, social, cultural and political developments in an international context. Through engaging with historical and contemporary literature and research you will develop your knowledge of penal policy, as well as the underlying philosophies of punishment. Additionally you will develop an understanding as to why some western societies have adopted a more 'managerial' approach towards criminal justice, including the development of 'risk-based' and ‘deficits’ models of interventions, versus ‘strengths based’ approaches favoured in other jurisdictions. The module will also consider the ethics and role of the private sector in criminal justice systems, both prison and also community based sanctions.

More information

CR7003 -

International Crime, Policing and Security (Core,30 Credits)

You will understand contemporary perspectives on crime, harm, policing, and security in their global context and how these are related to wider process of globalisation and economic, social, cultural, and political developments that operate at transnational levels. You will develop foundational knowledge of governance, risk and security and how criminology operates beyond the nation state. Critical debates about the architecture of international policing, global crime investigation and the pluralisation of international policing and security are explored. These are related to challenges including transnational organised crime, cybercrime, state crime and strategies to countering these threats. You will learn how cases of global crime and harm provide an alternative perspective on the globalisation thesis and underline the links between local, regional, national, and global dimensions of policing and security.

More information

CR7004 -

Social Exclusion and Victimisation in a Global Context (Core,30 Credits)

On this module you will explore the issues of social exclusion and victimisation in the UK and internationally. You will discover and challenge the theoretical underpinnings of these concepts and their manifestations in contemporary society. The module will therefore begin by exploring the two concepts, their links to each other, as well as their relationship to related concepts (such as harm and vulnerability, inequality and injustice). The module will then move on to examine case studies in depth such as poverty and homelessness, violence against women, and sex work. Throughout the module, you will consider the ways in the concepts of social exclusion and victimisation have been framed within the policy process and public debate in the UK and beyond, and how such framings have influenced the nature of public policy.

More information

SO7002 -

Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core,60 Credits)

In this module you will demonstrate advanced and independent critical thinking skills about the research process and a specific, substantial topic of your choice. In doing so you will develop robust, coherent and substantiated, advanced academic arguments in an identifiable area of enquiry. There are a number of options for the dissertation: literature-based, empirical, or placement-based dissertations. In formulating, research, and writing your dissertation you will be guided by your dissertation supervisor. The dissertation is the culmination of your taught experience and will enable you to deploy the skills develop during the taught programme.

More information

YE7001 -

Academic Language Skills for Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Effective reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.
• Discussing ethical issues in research, and analysing results.
• Describing bias and limitations of research.

More information

Study Options

The following alternative study options are available for this course:

Any Questions?

Our Applicant Services team will be happy to help.  They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901 or by using our Contact Form.



Accessibility and Student Inclusion

Northumbria University is committed to developing an inclusive, diverse and accessible campus and wider University community and are determined to ensure that opportunities we provide are open to all.

We are proud to work in partnership with AccessAble to provide Detailed Access Guides to our buildings and facilities across our City, Coach Lane and London Campuses. A Detailed Access Guide lets you know what access will be like when you visit somewhere. It looks at the route you will use getting in and what is available inside. All guides have Accessibility Symbols that give you a quick overview of what is available, and photographs to show you what to expect. The guides are produced by trained surveyors who visit our campuses annually to ensure you have trusted and accurate information.

You can use Northumbria’s AccessAble Guides anytime to check the accessibility of a building or facility and to plan your routes and journeys. Search by location, building or accessibility feature to find the information you need. 

We are dedicated to helping students who may require additional support during their student journey and offer 1-1 advice and guidance appropriate to individual requirements. If you feel you may need additional support you can find out more about what we offer here where you can also contact us with any questions you may have:

Accessibility support

Student Inclusion support




All information is accurate at the time of sharing. 

Full time Courses are primarily delivered via on-campus face to face learning but could include elements of online learning. Most courses run as planned and as promoted on our website and via our marketing materials, but if there are any substantial changes (as determined by the Competition and Markets Authority) to a course or there is the potential that course may be withdrawn, we will notify all affected applicants as soon as possible with advice and guidance regarding their options. It is also important to be aware that optional modules listed on course pages may be subject to change depending on uptake numbers each year.  

Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with possible restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors if this is deemed necessary in future.

 

Useful Links

Find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions
northumbria.ac.uk/terms

Fees and Funding
northumbria.ac.uk/fees

Admissions Policy
northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy

Admissions Complaints Policy
northumbria.ac.uk/complaints



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