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Would you like to learn the hands-on technical, analytical and practical skills required to prepare you for a career as an electrical and electronic engineer?

From mobile phones to missile defence systems and all digital electronics in between, electrical and electronic engineers play a crucial role in the development of anything that requires a plug or battery.

Northumbria is ranked 3rd in the sector nationally for the sustained employment of Engineering and Technology graduates five years after graduation. (Longitudinal Education Outcomes (LEO) 2017)

Accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), the BEng Electrical and Electronic Engineering course will provide you with all of the skills and knowledge required to pursue a career in this diverse industry.

Thanks to the recovering economy and advancements in technology, graduates are in high demand globally meaning there has never been a better time to enter the industry.

IET logo

Accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) on behalf of the Engineering Council as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for registration as a Chartered Engineer. Candidates must hold a CEng accredited BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree to comply with full CEng registration requirements.

97% of students are satisfied overall with the their course and 100% of students say that staff are good at explaining things (National Student Survey, 2016)

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Course Information

UCAS Code
H600 BENG/EEE

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering

Location
Ellison Building, Newcastle City Campus

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019

Department / Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering

Book an Open Day / Experience Electrical and Electronic Engineering BEng (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Electrical and Electronic Engineering. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Northumbria University is a pioneer in renewable energy technology and your course will be taught by our specialist team of academics who integrate their uniquely informed industry-leading research into all areas of their teaching.

Our staff specialise in a broad range of subject areas, from computer programming to wireless communication systems. Being able to tailor your module options in the final year of your course will allow you to closely align yourself with academics in your key interest areas, allowing you to learn from the industry-leaders of your chosen field.

All of our teaching team will be on-hand throughout every step of your degree, providing guidance and support to ensure you graduate confident and ready to enter into employment or further study. 

Book an Open Day / Experience Electrical and Electronic Engineering BEng (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Electrical and Electronic Engineering. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

This course will teach you about all aspects of electrical and electronic engineering, with a focus on engineering mathematics, programming and practical skills as well as the fundamentals of electrical, electronics and energy systems. You will have the opportunity to tailor your learning to your own interests and career aspirations.

Learning is delivered via a range of methods such as lectures, seminars and laboratory-based sessions, with assessments undertaken in the form of seminar work, laboratory exercises, online tests, assignments, technical reports, presentations and project work.

An optional one-year placement is encouraged on completion of your second year to help enhance your industry experience and employability. We also have strong links with the Erasmus Exchange Scheme, which provides opportunities for students to undertake study in another European university. 

Staff / Meet the Team

We are an enthusiastic, committed, knowledgeable and likeable staff team, who are here to motivate you and propel you through your degree and beyond.

Book an Open Day / Experience Electrical and Electronic Engineering BEng (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Electrical and Electronic Engineering. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Throughout the duration of your degree you will have access to Northumbria University’s leading facilities.

You will also be able to utilise our state-of-the-art Electrical and Electronics Lab, where you can gain practical experience of universal signal generators and measurement equipment. You will also gain experience of using the National Instruments Educational Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Suite (NI ELVIS) to measure and control signal voltages.

All of your course’s supporting documentation will be available on our e-Learning Portal, Blackboard, which is accessible at all times. This enables you to support your own learning and self-development. 

 

Electrical and Electronic Engineering Facilities

The Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering has modern laboratory and computing resources for learning, teaching, research, innovation and business engagement.

Virtual Tour

Come and explore our outstanding facilities in this interactive virtual tour.

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Experience Electrical and Electronic Engineering BEng (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Electrical and Electronic Engineering. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

At Northumbria your learning will be enhanced through the contact with research-active Electrical and Electronic staff as well as our strong research groups throughout the modules and research projects. This BEng Electrical and Electronic Engineering course has been constructed based on their subject knowledge and the original research they have undertaken at both national and international levels. This learning contributes to an outstanding student experience, whilst supporting research and underpinning successful partnerships and collaborative working with external organisations.

The strong research expertise will include, but not limited to: 

  • Power system and renewable energy
  • Mobile communications
  • Optical communications
  • Embedded system
  • Analogue and digital circuit design
  • Sensor system

Electrical and Electronics research power at Northumbria is highly ranked in the last UK Research Excellence Framework 2014.

 

Research / Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering

Book an Open Day / Experience Electrical and Electronic Engineering BEng (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Electrical and Electronic Engineering. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

This course will equip you with all of the skills, knowledge and practical experience to progress your future career.

You will leave with a strong understanding of electrical and electronic engineering, alongside the technical, analytical and practical skills required to work within this industry.

Undertaking an optional placement year will also further enhance your employment prospects, providing you with experience of a real working environment.

You will have the opportunity to tailor your learning to specialise in your own area of interests, whether this be electronics, communications or power. 

 

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Experience Electrical and Electronic Engineering BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Electrical and Electronic Engineering. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

This course will prepare you for employment across a range of sectors thanks to the broad range of subjects studied.

Previous graduates have gone on to work for companies such as Intel, Motorola, Siemens and Triumph.

This course’s accreditation with the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) will enable to you meet the academic requirement for registration as an Incorporated Engineer.

You may also wish to continue with further study. Completion of this course will allow you to partially meet the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer, with further study and work opportunities available should you wish to complete this accreditation in full. 

Book an Open Day / Experience Electrical and Electronic Engineering BEng (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Electrical and Electronic Engineering. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Your course in brief

Year 1

Year one We cover the foundations needed for an engineering degree from essential maths through study skills, electronics and embedded systems. In many of the modules you will be hands-on in laboratories learning through practice.

Year 2

Year two You will work across three distinct disciplines: power & renewables, communications and electronics to provide a clear baseline for your pathway selection in the following years. Moreover, you will learn how to work more formally in groups on an engineering project.

Year 3

Year three Optional placement year in industry. This year is an excellent opportunity to gain something extra for your CV, the real-world application and development of your skills and knowledge from industry experience.

Year 4

Year four This year allows you to tailor your degree to your interests, based around power and renewables, communications or electronics. Your individual engineering project will allow you to demonstrate your abilities from a practical, technical and analytical perspective.

Who would this Course suit?

Do you have a strong interest in science, maths and being curious about how things work? This course could be for you. 

Entry Requirements 2018/19

Standard Entry

GCSE requirements
A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points
120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following: 

GCE and VCE Advanced Level: 
From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels including GCE A level Mathematics and a GCE/VCE A level in another analytical science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Physics or Technology).

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:
Distinction, Distinction, Merit in Engineering

Scottish Highers:
BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher including GCE A level Mathematics and a GCE/VCE A level in another analytical science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Physics or Technology).

Irish Highers:
BBBBB  - ABBBB including GCE A level Mathematics and a GCE/VCE A level in another analytical science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Physics or Technology).

IB Diploma:
120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level including Mathematics and another analytical science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Physics or Technology) at Higher Level.

Access to HE Diploma:
Award of full Access to HE Diploma in Engineering including 18 credits at Distinction and 27 at Merit.

Qualification combinations
The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A level.

Applicants from the EU
Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/ 

International applicants
The University is pleased to welcome international applicants from over 100 countries and considers a wide range of qualifications for entry to its programmes.  For specific information please visit our International Admissions pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/international-admissions/ 

International applicants are also required to have one of the following English language qualifications with grades as shown below

  • A British  Council International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of 5.5 (or above) with a minimum score in each component of Reading, Writing,      Listening and Speaking of 5.5
  • Pearson Academic score of 54 (or above) with a minimum score in each component of Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking of 51

The University also accepts many other English language qualifications and if you have any questions about our English Language requirements please contact

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels including GCE A level Mathematics and a GCE/VCE A level in another analytical science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Physics or Technology).

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit in Engineering

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher including GCE A level Mathematics and a GCE/VCE A level in another analytical science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Physics or Technology).

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB including GCE A level Mathematics and a GCE/VCE A level in another analytical science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Physics or Technology).

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level including Mathematics and another analytical science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Physics or Technology) at Higher Level.

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma in Engineering including 18 credits at Distinction and 27 at Merit.

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A level.

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 5.5 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

TBC

FUNDING INFORMATION

Click here for UK undergraduate funding and scholarships information

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information

Click here for UK undergraduate tuition fee information

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying

Click here for information on fee liability

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* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

How to Apply

Applications via UCAS

Most full-time and sandwich first degrees, extended degrees, DipHE and HND courses require that application is made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) Clearing House.

If you are at school or college, staff there will advise you on how to apply. If you are not at school or college, you can apply using the UCAS secure, web-based online application system ucasapply.

Applicants apply via UCAS apply wherever there is access to the internet, and full instructions and an online help facility is available. Application details can be checked and printed at any time, text for personal statements and references can be copied and pasted into applications from a word processing package, and applications can normally be processed by the relevant Clearing House within one working day once submitted. More details on apply can be found on the UCAS website at www.ucas.com.

  • The UCAS institution code for Northumbria University is NORTH N77

If you wish to defer your entry, you should ensure you indicate this in section 3i of the application form. Full details of application deadlines and the application fee can be found on the UCAS website. Please note, however, we are unable to consider applications for deferred entry to our Teacher Training, Nursing, Midwifery and Operating Department Practice programmes.

Application Deadlines

Equal consideration is given to all applications received at UCAS by 6.00pm on 15 January. Details of all UCAS deadlines can be found on the UCAS website www.ucas.com.

UCAS will accept applications up to 30 June, but we can only consider these if there are still vacancies in relevant subjects. You are advised to check with the University before applying for popular courses which may already be full. Candidates applying for any courses after early September must follow the UCAS Late Registration Procedure, and we will provide the appropriate form.

Decision Making Process

When we receive your application it will be forwarded to the Admissions Tutor who will consider your application in accordance with the University’s Admissions Policy.

Most subject areas do not require applicants to attend an interview as part of the selection procedure. However, if the standard procedure is to interview candidates, this is specified in the degree programme entrance requirements. Some courses, such as Health, Social Work and Teacher Training, require specific checks or requirements to be put in place during the normal selection process. These are detailed on the individual course details pages.

Fairness and Transparency

The University is committed to a system of admissions that ensures fairness, transparency and equal opportunities within the legal framework of the UK and best practice. All reasonable effort will be made to ensure that no prospective or existing student is unreasonably treated less favourably on the grounds of age, race, colour, nationality, ethnic origin, creed, disability, sexual orientation, gender, marital or parental/carer status, political belief or social or economic class, or any other type of discrimination.

What Happens Next

You will receive one of the following from UCAS or our Admissions Office:

  • Conditional offer which depends on you achieving certain grades from forthcoming examinations, completing relevant checks, or other requirements prior to entry. You may be asked to send us a copy of your certificates/qualifications once these have been received to enable us to confirm your offer. Not all examination results are sent to Universities via UCAS.
  • Unconditional offer if you have already satisfied entry requirements.
  • Reject your application.

Tuition Fee Assessment

Tuition fees are set at different levels for Home/EU and International Students. Before you begin your course the University must establish your tuition fee status. In many cases, the University will be able to make this assessment without requiring any additional information.

Guidance can be found on the UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) website www.ukcisa.org.uk to help you understand how Higher Education Institutions (HEI’s) make an assessment on your fee status.

Selection Process

Interviews

Applicants who may not have the standard entry qualifications are welcome to apply and may be interviewed. Some courses will interview as part of the selection process. This applies particularly to courses in art and design, teaching and health.

Health Screening

Applicants for Nursing, Midwifery, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, Primary (Early Years) and Social Work will be required to complete a health questionnaire, and you may be required to attend a doctor or nurse assessment at the University Health Centre.

Prior to beginning your programme, all applicants to Nursing, Midwifery, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy are advised to start a course of Hepatitis B vaccinations, available from your own GP. In addition, Midwifery applicants must provide evidence before they commence training that they are immune to Hepatitis B or have Hepatitis B non-carried status.

Applicants to these courses who have had contact with MRSA in the previous 6 months may be asked to provide evidence that they are not colonised by submitting negative swabs results prior to commencement of training. Alternatively, you may be screened on commencement of the programme.

All applicants will receive vaccination screening at the University Health Centre on commencement of their programme.

Disclosure of Criminal Background

To help the University reduce the risk of harm or injury to any member of its community caused by the criminal behaviour of other students, it must know about any relevant criminal convictions an applicant has.

Relevant criminal convictions are only those convictions for offences against the person, whether of a violent or sexual nature, and convictions for offences involving unlawfully supplying controlled drugs or substances where the conviction concerns commercial drug dealing or trafficking. Convictions that are spent (as defined by the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974) are not considered to be relevant and you should not reveal them - unless you are applying for one of the courses outlined within the following paragraph.

If you are applying for courses in teaching, health, social work and courses involving work with children or vulnerable adults, you must complete the section of your UCAS application form entitled ‘Criminal Convictions’. You must disclose anycriminal convictions, including spent sentences and cautions (including verbal cautions) and bindover orders. Further information on how to complete this section is available from the UCAS booklet ‘How to Apply’. For these courses, applicants are required to undergo police clearance for entry and will need to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) enhanced disclosure form. 

The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) helps employers make safer recruitment decisions and prevent unsuitable people from working with vulnerable groups, including children. It replaces the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA). Access to the DBS checking service is only available to registered employers who are entitled by law to ask an individual to reveal their full criminal history, including spent convictions - also known as asking 'an exempted question'. The University is such a 'registered employer' and will send you the appropriate documents to fill in if you are offered a place in the course.

If you are convicted of a relevant criminal offence after you have applied, you must tell UCAS and the University. Do not send details of the offence; simply tell UCAS and the University that you have a relevant criminal conviction. You may then be asked to supply more details.

Anti-fraud Checks

Please note that both UCAS and the University follow anti-fraud procedures to detect and prevent fraudulent applications. If it is found that an applicant supplies a fraudulent application then it will be withdrawn.

Plagiarism

Applicants suspected of providing, or found to have provided, false information will be referred to UCAS if their application was made via UCAS. The same is true for applicants who are suspected of omitting, or found to have omitted, information that they are required to disclose according to UCAS regulations. Applications identified by UCAS’s Similarity Detection software to contain plagiarised material will be considered on an individual basis by Admissions Staff, taking into account the nature, relevance and importance of the plagiarism. The University reserves the right to cancel an application or withdraw any offer made if it is found that an application contains false, plagiarised or misleading information.

Extra

The Extra process enables applicants who have not been offered a place, or have declined all offers received, can use EXTRA to apply for other courses that still have vacancies before Clearing starts. The Extra process normally operates from late February until the end of June and Applicants should use the Course Search facility at UCAS to find which courses have vacancies.

Clearing

If you have not succeeded in gaining a place at your firm or insurance university, UCAS will send you details about Clearing, the procedure which matches course vacancies with students who do not have a university place. Information about degree vacancies at Northumbria is published in the national press; and you can also find information on our dedicated Clearing web pages during this period. We operate a Helpline - 0191 40 60 901 - throughout the Clearing period for enquiries about course vacancies.

Adjustment
If an applicant has both met and exceeded the conditions of their firmly accepted offer, they will have up to five calendar days from the time their place was confirmed (or A level results day, whichever is the later) to research places more appropriate to their performance. Applicants will have to nominate themselves for this system, and their eligibility will be confirmed by the institution they apply to adjust to.

Going to University from Care
Northumbria University is proud of its work in widening participation of young people and adults to university. We have recently been successful in being awarded the Frank Buttle Trust Quality Mark for Care Leavers in Higher Education. This mark was created to recognise institutions who go that extra mile to support students who have been in public care. To find out more, visit our Going to University from Care web page.

Disabled Students

Northumbria welcomes enquiries and applications from disabled students whether disability is due to mobility or sensory impairment, specific learning difficulties, mental health issues or a medical condition. Applications from disabled students are processed in the usual way, but applicants should declare their disability at the application stage so that the University can contact them to assess how to meet any support needs they may have. Disabled applicants may be invited to visit the University so that this can be done in person.

To find out more contact:
Disability Support Team
Tel +44 (0)191 227 3849 or
Minicom +44 (0)191 222 1051

International Students

The University has a thriving overseas community and applications from International students are welcome. Advice on the suitability of overseas qualifications is available from:

International Office
Northumbria University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 8ST
UK
Email: international@northumbria.ac.uk
Tel +44 (0)191 227 4274
Fax +44 (0)191 261 1264

(However, if you have already applied to Northumbria and have a query, please contact internationaladmissions@northumbria.ac.uk or telephone 00 44 191 243 7906)

Provision of Information

The University reserves the right at any stage to request applicants and enrolling students to provide additional information about any aspect of their application or enrolment. In the event of any student providing false or inaccurate information at any stage, and/or failing to provide additional information when requested to do so, the University further reserves the right to refuse to consider an application, to withdraw registration, rescind home fees status where applicable, and/or demand payment of any fees or monies due to the University.

Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KC4010 -

Engineering Mathematics (Core, 20 Credits)

The module will provide you with a first level course in engineering mathematics. Fundamentals of algebra, trigonometry and calculus are reviewed. Your knowledge of calculus will be extended and complex numbers, matrices, vectors and differential equations are studied.

Outline Syllabus
Basic algebra and trigonometry
Transposition, simplification, quadratic equations, simultaneous equations, functions sin, cos, tan, inverses, sec, cosec, cot; identities.

Basic calculus
Derivative as slope and rate of change, standard derivatives; product, quotient and function of a function rules; integration
as reverse of differentiation, standard integrals, area under a curve; solution of simple differential equations by direct integration.

Complex numbers
Addition, subtraction, multiplication, complex conjugate and division in algebraic form. The Argand diagram. Polar form and
exponential form, with multiplication and division. De Moivre's theorem (powers and roots). Locus problems.

Calculus
Implicit, parametric and logarithmic differentiation. Maxima and minima. MacLaurin's series. Partial differentiation, first order change, analysis of errors, method of least squares. Integration techniques (substitution, partial fractions, by parts) and simple applications of integration.

Matrices and Determinants
Second and third order determinants, evaluation, properties, Cramer's Rule for solution of simultaneous equations; matrices, addition, subtraction, multiplication, transpose, inverse (via adjoint), solution of simultaneous linear equations by matrix inversion.

Vectors
Sum, difference, magnitude, components, Cartesian representation in three dimensions; scalar and vector products, angle between vectors, application to simple geometrical and physical problems.

Differential Equations
Solution of first order by separation of variables and integrating factor; second order with constant coefficients, auxiliary
equation, complementary function, particular integral by substitution, applications to, for example, mass-spring-damper and/or L-C-R circuits.

More information

KD4008 -

Computer Programming (Core, 20 Credits)

Within this module you will cover the design and development of C based code for both a standard PC and an embedded system (typically the Arduino).

The module syllabus us based but not exclusively on the following:
• Introduction of computer systems, the architecture and types from standard PCs to embedded systems,
• Code development from specifications through Pseudo code to a top-down or bottom-up based design,
• Language operators for example, if-then-else, switch-case, do-while, for,
• Data types for systems including bit length, and data pointer structures and use,
• Use of information hiding in functions, with strongly typed designs,
• File system access for a PC and for an embedded system where files may be more abstract handles,
• Controlling hardware on an embedded system for example and ADC or DAC on a microcontroller,
• The use of IO lines and interrupt structures in low level programming.

Typically the learning in the module will be based on simple case studies and example such that the above knowledge can be applied to solve a real world problem within a defined engineering context. An example of such a real world problem would be a Traffic Light controller, or Home Burglar Alarm system.

More information

KD4009 -

Digital Electronics and Communications (Core, 20 Credits)

Within the digital electronics aspect of this module the student will learn

The operation of logic gates AND,NAND,OR,NOR,XOR.
The use of truth tables and logic gates to solve combinational logic problems.
Boolean algebra and the use of Boolean algebra to simplify logic expressions prior to implementation.
The use of Karnaugh maps to simplify logic expressions prior to implementation.
Implementation of adders/subtractors using logic gates.
Using logic gates to implement S-R flip flop, J-K flip flop and D-type flip flop.
Using flip flops to develop asynchronous counters and shift registers.


Within the communication aspects of this module the student will learn

a) Basic telephone systems
Introduction to POTS, ISDN, VOIPand emerging telephone systems.
Telephone line encoding technology, A-law, u-law companding and Analogue to Digital conversion ADC , Digital to Analogue conversion DAC techniques.

b) Basic Network Systems
The OSI 7 layer model for networking.
Ethernet frames and IP addressing.
Current physical layer technologies for example Ethernet, Witeless Ethernet, Bluetooth, Zigbee

More information

KD4010 -

Electricity, Magnetism and Electronics (Core, 20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to fundamental electromagnetism, electrical circuit theory and analogue electronics. Through a combination of lectures, labs and

technology-enhanced resources, you will learn to analyse basic DC and AC circuits and to familiarise with fundamental electronic components such as operational

amplifiers and semiconductor diodes. This module will provide you with core knowledge, and experimental, numerical and analytical skills to tackle problems in electrical

and electronic principles, thus establishing firm foundations for future employability.


Electricity and Magnetism (25%)


Electric charge: conductors, insulators and semiconductors. Electrostatics: Coulomb's law and the electric field; Concept of electric potential and its relation to the electric

field; Energy stored in an electric field; Application to a capacitor and link to capacitance. Magnetostatics: Forces arising between wires carrying electric currents; concept

of the magnetic field; Ampere’s Law; geometrical statement of the Biot-Savart law; the B field around a wire; the right-hand rule.


DC and AC Circuit Theory (50%)


Introduction to ideal linear elements: resistor, inductor and capacitor. Transient currents across ideal elements. Current and voltage division rule. Applications of

superposition: Kirchhoff’s law.



Properties of sinusoidal and periodic waveforms, average, RMS values. Phasors and phasor diagrams, and j operator. Complex impedance, impedance diagrams.

Applications to series circuits. Power in AC circuits, power factor, apparent power, active power, and reactive power. Complex admittance and applications to parallel

circuits. Series and parallel RLC circuits. Frequency response and resonance in simple RLC circuits.


Analogue Electronics (25%)


Introduction to the properties of an ideal operational amplifier. Simple inverting and non-inverting applications using virtual earth principles. Properties and parameters of a

non-ideal op-amplifier including gain-bandwidth and off-sets. Op-amplifier applications including summing, integrator and differentiator. Linear and non-linear applications.

More information

KD4011 -

Fundamentals of Energy Systems (Core, 20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the fundamental concepts of energy and power. The underlying electrical engineering, physics and mathematics is illustrated using examples from electricity generation, distribution and storage. Focus is given to sources of sustainable energy amidst current concerns about climate change, finite natural resources and energy security.

Introduction
Basic SI units. Kinematics, Newton’s laws of motion and force. Work, kinetic and potential energy, and power. Conservation of energy. Circular motion. Basic electromagnetism. Electric charge: conductors, insulators and semiconductors. Electric field. Electrostatic potential energy and potential. Magnetic field of an infinitely long straight wire, magnetic flux density. Forces on a current carrying conductor on a magnetic field. Electric motors. Force on charged particles in a magnetic field. Electromagnetic induction: Faraday’s law and Lenz’s law. Electric generator.

Three phase power and power electronic devices
Production of three-phase power. Phase and line voltages and currents in star and delta systems. Earthing on low-voltage systems. Measurements of three-phase power. Introduction to single-phase transformer: principle, construction, referring of impedances, losses and efficiency, and equivalent circuit. Power electronic switching devices: Rectifiers, MOSFET, transistor, IGBT, and thyristor. Single-phase rectifier circuits,

Power generation, energy efficiency and energy storage
Conventional power generation: gas and coal-fired power stations, combined heat and power, IGCC, nuclear power. Generating plant performance. Load curve and load factor. Fundamentals of power transmission and distribution. Wind energy and the Betz limit. Solar spectrum, p-n junction, solar photovoltaics, solar thermal. Introduction to marine technologies. Efficiency of renewable energy systems. Energy storage technologies.

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KD4014 -

Research, Analysis and Presentation (Core, 20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce you to gathering research data from either laboratory or reference material, analysing the acquired data in an appropriate manner and then presenting the key findings. Formal training in experimental techniques acquired in this module will support your professional and personal skills.

Research
Research methods will demonstrate where and how to gather information; researching for knowledge and information which can be applied to generate solutions to real world problems. The ability to select from a number of research methods is important for example the ability to research a method to design simple laboratory tests.

Analysis
Correct use of units and symbols for physics and engineering along with the use of data analysis techniques. Specific techniques may include for example: mean and standard deviation, simple regressive techniques, log – log and log linear relationships, and error analysis. Simple measurement techniques for example measuring: velocity, voltage, current and power. Key factors in measurement include the need to analyse: accuracy, errors, resolution and the need for calibration.

Presentation
Key communication skills in report writing, lab book writing (of laboratory data), and the presentation of information both visually via graphs and diagrams, and using text. A number of key skills are in focus here namely the highlighting of key findings and drawing suitable conclusions from a piece of work. Both written and oral presentation skills are exemplified.

Computation
You will be introduced to suitable computational packages for data analysis and processing in physics and engineering, for example, ORCAD and MATLAB.

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KC5002 -

Advanced Engineering Mathematics (Core, 20 Credits)

This module is designed to provide You with a basic course in Laplace Transforms, their use in solving ordinary differential equations arising from physical problems, and their use in describing the behaviour of simple control systems. You will be introduced to the concept of the harmonic components of a periodic waveform and be shown how this is useful in matching general solutions of partial differential equations to particular boundary or initial conditions. The solution of systems of linear ordinary differential equations using matrix methods will also be considered.

The module will be delivered using a combination of lectures and seminars.

Assessment is by formal examination.

Outline Syllabus
Laplace Transforms: Definition, simple transforms, linearity. First shift theorem. Inverse transforms, linearity, use of the first shift theorem and partial fractions. Transforms of derivatives. Transforms of an integral. The Heaviside Unit Step function. The second shift theorem. Solution of linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, including systems of such equations. The Delta function and the Impulse Response function; transfer function. Initial and final-value theorems. Convolution and the convolution theorem. Poles of the transfer function and stability. Steady-state response. (50%)

Periodic functions and Fourier series. Full-range and half-range series. Even and odd functions.
Coefficients in complex form. Application to the solution of partial differential equations by the method of separation of variables. (25%)

Matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Algebraic evaluation of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a matrix. Application to the solution of a
system of linear ordinary differential equations. (25%)

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KD5064 -

Analogue Electronics and Instrumentation (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn on module key technical content around two themes that of analogue electronics and instrumentation. These are important topics for electrical engineering covering the key basics of analogue design and the use of analogue signals used in instrumentation. Amplifiers and signal conditioning devices will be covered that convert the sensor output into usable signals for typical process control platforms. Operational amplifiers will be used extensively in the module, leading up to an understanding of discrete electronic transistor design.

Operational Amplifiers - Operational amplifier applications applied to instrumentation signals, active filter circuits, and instrumentation amplifiers. Filter considerations including magnitude and phase bode diagrams, and compensation methods.

Sensors - Temperature, strain and light sensor systems looking into devices and signals. Additional sensors considered may also include slot encoders, accelerometers and hall-effect devices.

Instrumentation - Amplifiers and signal conditioning demonstrates the ability for signal conversion and used in real world environments. Operational amplifiers will be expanded upon with the design of the instrumentation amplifier to highlight the performance improvements. Noise analysis will be introduced to show how instrumentation techniques reduce this phenomenon.

Discrete Electronics - Operational amplifiers are made from discrete elements; these building blocks will be explained include the Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs) and the Field Effect Transistor (FET). Biasing and amplifier design for these will be shown, with more advanced introduction to performance analysis using Monticarlo simulations. Transistor applications may include current sources, current sinks, and differential input stages.

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KD5065 -

C Programming and Digital Systems (Core, 20 Credits)

This module aims to further develop your capabilities in the areas of digital systems and C programming, building on the hardware and software design and development techniques covered in previous related module(s).

In the area of digital systems, you will learn how to design, specify and apply digital combinatorial and sequential building blocks in isolation, and also as part of a larger system. The module provides an introduction to an industry standard Hardware Description Language (HDL), and shows how it can be used to describe, at the gate and equation level, digital functions such as decoders, multiplexers, encoders, shift registers and counters. You are given the opportunity to explore designs by means of simulation using industry standard design tools. The underlying architecture and technology of programmable logic devices is covered along with their use as a target for digital designs described using a HDL, the latter activity being covered during the workshops. You will also cover other practical aspects of digital hardware design, such as logic hazards, propagation delays and interfacing.

You will use the C programming language to program a microcontroller to perform hardware control as an alternative to using digital hardware. CAD tools will be used to develop and simulate the C programs, as well as the programming of a microcontroller to implement given specifications. In this way you will learn how modern electronic systems can be programmed for both hardware and software based solutions to meet a range of applications.

Specifically, you will cover the following aspects in the C programming part of the module:
Computing in the C language on a microcontroller platform (such as the Arduino©)
Introduction to the microcontroller; program memory, ram memory, special function registers, I/O ports, control and status registers. Using the C language to program a microcontroller, limitations of a C program using a microcontroller.
Typical microcontroller circuits to read digital inputs and output to digital outputs using the C programming language. Use of C language bit masking to control output bits in a microcontroller system. Use of bit masking in C to read digital inputs in a microcontroller system. Controlling peripheral devices in a microcontroller; such as an Analogue to digital converter (ADC), a Hardware Timer, using serial I/O in a microcontroller. Identifying bit range in ADC devices as well as estimating signal to noise limits in particular applications. Developing microcontroller applications for particular specifications such as a Traffic Lights controller, a Home Alarm system, a system to determine object distance using an Ultrasonic transmitter and receiver. All of the above will enhance your skills and future employability.

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KD5066 -

Communication Systems (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about electronic communications. Within this module you will learn how to transfer information successfully from the sender to the receiver (and vice versa) using a number of mediums including electrical, radio or optical signals. There are two key themes of electronic communications that you will study which are Analogue communication and Digital communication. In both themes you will learn a number of key engineering processes that are fundamental to communications. In analogue communications you will learn the key physical and electronic processes necessary to transfer information in an analogue form. You will also explore current technologies and techniques in radio and satellite communications. In the digital communications topic, the knowledge that you learn in analogue communications will be expanded to a higher level to allow you to understand the key requirements for digital communication.

Three key areas within these two topics are identified:

ANALOGUE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
Amplitude Modulation; comparison of various forms of AM, demodulation, frequency and phase insertion errors, examples and applications. Frequency modulation; NBFM, WBFM, spectra and bandwidth, examples and applications. Transmission and reception circuits. Attenuation in radio systems. Modern systems and standards.


DIGITAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
Spectra of rectangular waveforms, bit rates, baud rates and relationship to bandwidth. ISI, line codes and shaping. ASK, FSK, PSK, generation and demodulation, spectrum and bandwidth. Comparison of bandwidth and power. Quadrature carrier systems. OSI reference model. Asynchronous and synchronous networks. The serial data link. Protocols. FDM and TDM multiplexing. Parity and CRC principles and implementation. Networks. IP addressing

OPTICAL SYSTEMS
Optical sources; structure, performance and frequency response. Detectors. Fibres; modes, dispersion, optimum wavelength, coupling and splicing.

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KD5067 -

Power Machine and Renewable Energy (Core, 20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce you to the principles of operation of power systems, and enhance your knowledge of electrical machinery, power electronics andrenewable energy. It will also allow you to consider the interaction between these system components.

A power network typically integrates power generators, distribution grid, transformers, transmission lines, and loads. This module provides you with an introduction to power system structure, and the principles of electrical machines. Moreover, low-carbon energy sources have increasingly contributed to the current power network, and power electronics play a key role in energy conversion. Therefore, the module also provides you with an introduction to renewable energy, and power electronics. Specifically, you will learn the following from this module:

POWER SYSTEMS (30%):
Principles and consturction of single-phase transformers, equivalent circuits, efficiency and regulation, open and short circuit tests, connections of 3-phase transformers, and vector groups. Basics of powers, and power flow. Per unit systems and fundamentals of balanced fault level calculations.

ELECTRIC MACHINES (30%):
Principles and construction of DC machines, equivalent circuit, starting and speed control. Principles and construction of induction machines, expressions for speed of rotating field and slip, rotor power balance, torque-slip curve, and modern control techniques.

POWER ELECTRONICS (20%):
Fundamentals of power electronics and converters (AC-DC, DC-DC, and AC-AC etc.), and PWM control.

RENEWABLE ENERGY (20%):
Overview of electricity generation technologies from new and renewable energy, current contributions and future prospects. Operating principles, types, characteristics and comparison of features for hydro, photovoltaics, wind, combined heat and power, fuel cells, tidal and marine power plants. Applications of rotating machines (generators) and power electronics in renewable energy conversion systems.

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KD5080 -

Electrical Product Development (Core, 20 Credits)

This module provides you with the knowledge and skills required to research, design, implement and manage the development of an electrical/electronic product. Specifically this will involve:
- Project management and the use of Gantt charts, the product life cycle and project costing.
- The use of NORA to search for current articles, research current market trends, formulate ideas, assist with project development, and the use of Endnote to assist article citation.
- Project specification development, project design, use of simulation tools to prove design, design analysis, design for manufacturing.
- Standards and legal issues -market and technical risk assessment. End of life considerations.
- Ethical aspects, social aspects and environmental aspects of electrical/electronic engineering product development.
- Susceptibility, quality and reliability with regard to electrical/electronic engineering product development.
- Engineering report writing, style and content.

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KA5029 -

International Academic Exchange 1 (Optional, 60 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one semester as part of your programme.

This is a 60 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad semester will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as an additional 60 credits for Engineering and Environment Study Abroad Semester.

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KA5030 -

International Academic Exchange 2 (Optional, 120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

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KF5000 -

Engineering and Environment Work Placement Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

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KF5001 -

Engineering and Environment Work Placement Semester (Optional, 60 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one semester work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the placement is recognised both in your transcript as a 60 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 20 weeks.

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KD6010 -

Power Systems (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module aims to develop your knowledge, understanding and the ability to analyse the components of a modern power system. It allows you to study the components and operation of power systems, highlighting the principles, design, control, performance limits and protection from abnormal conditions. The theory, control and the properties of alternators, transmission lines, switchgear and protection will also be covered. Commercial issues surrounding the economics of power generation, electricity market and quality of supply are also explored.
This module also gives you the opportunity to critically analyse and develop an understanding of practical design and implementation issues, such as load flow, fault and stability studies together with methods for voltage and frequency control, including the use of modern FACTS technologies. These and other topics will be reinforced by the use of real-world examples and case studies, with emphasis on the use of modern technologies in power systems.

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KD6024 -

Individual Engineering Project (Core, 40 Credits)

The module aims to provide you with an opportunity to carry out an extended study in a specific area of Engineering, developing your ability to work independently and promoting self-reliance. Guidance on how to source and assess the appropriateness of information is provided to you by the module tutor.

A key aim is to encourage you to apply theoretical and analytical techniques to problem solve. The module also aims to develop both verbal and written communication skills. The project will provide practical experience of drawing up a project specification defining aims, objectives and identifying an envisaged endpoint. With the supervisor’s guidance, you will prepare a project plan that includes a Gantt chart, project background and sourcing previous work and associated theory/simulation to assess whether the aims and objectives are achievable and that your theoretical basis is sound.

To meet University requirements and gain practical experience, you must perform a risk assessment to identify potential risks/hazards associated with the project. You will follow the defined plan to complete the project that will involve the application of appropriate theory and simulations leading to the production of prototype designs.

You will be encouraged to monitor your progress based upon the project plan and complete the design cycle by testing and redesign, if necessary. A final project report and verbal/poster presentation to the supervisor, second markers and peers are required towards the end of the module. You must maintain contact with the supervisor on a regular basis to: discuss/assess progress and obtain advice.

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KD6025 -

Design and Manufacturing Analysis (Core, 20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with an analytical approach to the issues around both the design and manufacturing of electronic or electrical products. In this respect you have two clear sections, linked by an analysis approach to determine functionality within the bounds of manufacturability.

Design Analysis
• Operational amplifier construction with a view to component reduction and therefore performance degradation. Analysis is therefore required to pinpoint the performance of sub-optimal designs with suitable engineering compromises being found.
• Differential amplifier structures as applied to Instrumentation design, is explored with mathematical rigor to establish their fundamental performance limits.
• Circuit design (typically filters) with consideration of the circuit performance when non-ideal components are used.
• Other complex analysis methods are introduced including: Sensitivity analysis, Tolerance analysis, and Monticarlo analysis.

Manufacturing Analysis
1. Electronics Manufacturing Yield - the performance of electronic yield predictions, with typical examples provided from Integrated Circuit Manufacture.
2. Reliability in Electronics Manufacturing - electronic reliability under the factors of cost, performance availability
3. Waste Management in Electronic Components - green electronic issues and legislation which affect both electronic product design and
manufacturing aspects,
4. Lean Manufacturing - in manufacturing technology illustrating the philosophy of lean manufacturing

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KD6026 -

Digital Signal Processing Systems (Core, 20 Credits)

This module aims to make use of the knowledge and analytic skills developed throughout the programme to design modern digital signal processing systems.

In this module you will learn:

• The fundamental concepts of discrete-time signals and systems.
• The fundamental mathematical transforms for time-domain and frequency domain representations.
• The design of digital filters; finite impulse filter and infinite impulse filter.
• The practical implementation of digital filters in simulation and hardware.

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KD6027 -

Embedded Systems (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module you will learn the architecture, and how to program a high performance microcontroller - ARM M0+ cortex.

Specifically this will include:
- A consideration of the relative merits of a number of commercially available microcontrollers
- A detailed investigation of the ARM cortex series of microcontrollers, including architecture, peripherals and capabilities.
- Using ARM IDE development tools to compose, compile and fault find programs written in a high level programming language ('C').
- Features of the ARM microcontroller that will be considered are:
- Clock generation - internal/external
- GPIO - general purpose input/output
- ADC - analogue to digital converter
- USART, SPI, I2C - serial communications
- Timers
- Interrupt capability

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KD6028 -

Digital System Design and Implementation (Optional, 20 Credits)

The module aims to show you how to design and implement digital systems using a range of powerful techniques and tools, such as Finite State Machines (FSMs) and Programmable Logic. A central theme of the module is the use of a Hardware Description Language (HDL), and how it can be used to describe and verify a digital design at a behavioural level. Practical sessions, involving the use of industry standard simulation, synthesis and implementation software, will be used to provide experience of the complete digital system design flow, from concept to realisation. In addition to the use of HDLs, this module also considers some of the key low-level aspects of digital systems, including Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) circuits and their performance and optimisation using circuit-level simulation.

This module also aims to develop your understanding of practical design and implementation issues, such as testing and ‘Design-for-Test’. These and other topics will be reinforced by the use of real-world case examples and designs.

The commercial issues surrounding digital system realisation using a variety of technologies will be explored, with emphasis on Programmable Logic. The design of FSMs is methodically introduced and synchronous and asynchronous FSMs are covered. The Petri Net is also introduced and used to create both sequential and parallel based FSMs. All these FSM methouds are used to synthesise particular digital systems to meet required specifications.

This module will provide you with the skills you require to practice digital system design in an industrial context, making use of real-world design problems and industry standard software. Case studies, based on industrial consultancy work carried out by academic staff, will be used as examples to enhance your employability.

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KD6029 -

Wireless and RF Systems Design (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce you to the theory, design and analysis of RF and wireless communication systems. Wireless communication will be delivered via two key curriculum themes of Microwave circuit design and Antenna design.

All modern high frequency mobile communication systems can be split into two distinct sections. The first key section if the design of circuitry to generate and modify the performance of RF signals. This part will be covered in the microwave circuit design part of this module and will cover the key concepts of microwave circuit design for wireless and RF systems. Once the RF signal has been generated, it must then be converted to a signal that can be transmitted through air. This is the second key concept to be covered in this module – namely antenna design. The antenna design section covers the key principles of transmitting an RF signal through free space. The antenna design topic also examines the key concepts of antenna design related to modern communication systems, including mobile telephone systems from 1G to 4G.

Two key areas within these two topics are identified:


Microwave circuit design

Transmission Line Basics, Smith Chart, Impedance Matching techniques, Lumped Elements, Impedance / Admittance parameters, ABCD parameters , S-parameters, Passive microwave circuits.

Antenna design
Basic antenna parameters, outline of antenna types, wires, apertures, dishes, patch antennas, antennas required for
mobile systems, Structure of Cellular systems. Base station design, Typical RF transmitter layout, Antenna types for mobile handset and base stations. Factors affecting reception.

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KD6030 -

Optical Communications System Design (Optional, 20 Credits)

The module will provide the knowledge and skills for you in two key themes of optical fibre and optical wireless communications. These are essential topics for communications pathway in electrical and electronics engineering programme that cover the fundamentals and advanced optical system designs in both fibre and wireless systems. Optical fibre communications provides the backbone for long-haul and medium range telecommunications that offers ultrahigh data transmission capacity whereas optical wireless communications is an emerging technology that enables data transmission via light, either in infrared or visible light band using laser and/or light emitting diode (LED) for indoor and short range communications system.

Through the module syllabus you will learn:

Fundamental optical fibre/wireless communications includes
- Introduction to the optical wire/wireless communications system and the overall design
- Identification of system elements, subsystems and required specifications
- Optical transmitter design, optical propagation channel, effect on the optical fibre, effect on the optical wireless channel, noise and losses, optical receiver design.

System design includes: multiple access techniques, system design and performance evaluation, analysis of the practical and industrial optical communications system

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KD6031 -

Instrumentation and Control of Dynamical Systems (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module shows you how to use modern control design techniques based on state-space differential equations governing a dynamical system. You will also cover instrumentation techniques that are required for practical implementation of control algorithms. Upon completion of the module, you will be able to design instrumentation and control systems; implement and evaluate them using relevant software packages. There are two main themes:

Control
Classical control design and analysis. PID control and pole placement methods, Bode and Nyquist plots, Laplace transforms and z-transforms. Modelling of dynamical systems including for example: magnetic levitation, chemical processes, sustainable energy systems, particle detection, satellite positioning and the gyroscope. State feedback control design: state-space representation of systems, linear controllability and observability and rank condition. Linear feedback control design. Stability: asymptotic and global asymptotic stability, Lyapunov stability and Lyapunov equation. Estimation: Luenberger observer design. Digital control: Different equations, sampling effect in computers, ADC, DAC, ZOH, Z-transfer function, compensator design, stability analysis. Use of Matlab and Simulink software for simulation of control algorithms. Systems representation of instrumentation systems. Modelling of measurement systems including the effects of sensors.

Instrumentation
Range, span, nonlinearity, hysteresis, resolution, ageing effects. Dynamic modelling of sensors using transfer functions and state-space methods. Signal conditioning: loading effects, bridge circuits, correction of non-linearity, effects of feedback, amplifier limitations. Noise and interference in instrumentation systems and estimation of errors. Signal recovery from noise interference. Computerised data acquisition systems including ADCs and a range of modern instrumentation protocols. Use of microcontrollers and inversion techniques. Use of Matlab and Simulink for simulation of instrumentation systems.

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