HI5037 - Globalising Worlds: Objects, People and Ideas 1600 - 1800

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What will I learn on this module?

We all live in a globalised world: we get our Italian coffee from an American chain, wear Japanese-designed clothing that was made in India, keep pets that originated in South America or Australia, travel across the world for holidays, and keep in touch via communications equipment that was produced in China (with material from African mines). We know Brazilian football stars and Caribbean dances. What happens in one corner of the world affects us all, be that linked to investment, industrial production and trade, or to diseases, wars and natural disasters.

We often think of this as a modern phenomenon, or at least as something that only rose in the age of empire, steamboats and railways. This module helps you uncover earlier global connections. What would it have been like to consume goods such as Chinese tea, American cocoa and tobacco or Oriental coffee when they first arrived in Europe? When did Indian and Thai curries start to include the newly-discovered South American ingredients of chilli peppers and peanuts? How did people find out about exciting new foods, fashions, animals and medicines from the other side of the globe? What was it like to be forced to travel huge distances across the Ocean to end up a slave in the Caribbean or a prisoner in Australia? How did religious ideas or political beliefs spread across the world? And how did the global connections of the early modern world shape our world today? This module will help you answer these questions.

How will I learn on this module?

Weekly lectures will familiarise you with core concepts and developments in the global history of the early modern world. Your weekly seminars will deepen your understanding of the key issues. You will be expected to prepare for the weekly seminars by undertaking essential and recommended reading, and will build on your independent reading by presenting your ideas and arguments in seminar discussions with your peers. All learning materials, tasks and readings will be posted on the eLearning Portal (Blackboard) to enable participation within the seminar programme. You will participate in formative assessment activities and receive feedback, and will be responsible for your own guided and independent learning. Summative assessment will match your learning against the learning outcomes for the module

How will I be supported academically on this module?

Your academic development will be supported through engagement with your academic tutors, your peers and programme leaders. Academic support is provided through group/individual tutorials which allow specific issues to be addressed and to promote progress in academic development. The module tutor will be accessible within publicised feedback and consultation hours and via email. Your peers will provide you with a collaborative learning environment, and your programme leader will guide you through the requirements and expectations of your course. You will also be supported through individual engagement with the academic literature, lectures and resources available on the eLearning Portal. Formative feedback will be on-going throughout seminar activities and through assessment tasks.

What will I be expected to read on this module?

All modules at Northumbria include a range of reading materials that students are expected to engage with. The reading list for this module can be found at: http://readinglists.northumbria.ac.uk
(Reading List service online guide for academic staff this containing contact details for the Reading List team – http://library.northumbria.ac.uk/readinglists)

What will I be expected to achieve?

Knowledge & Understanding:
1. Acquire an understanding of key concepts and developments regarding the global history of the early modern world.
2. Assess the role of different factors (e.g. infrastructure, communication, empire, trade, consumption, religion, ideology, science, the environment) in forging and maintaining global connections, and understand the impact of these connections on everyday lives.

Intellectual / Professional skills & abilities:
3. Develop critical thinking skills by engaging with different points of view and historiographical traditions.
4. Demonstrate information management and communication skills (dealing with large amounts of factual information, sorting it, and using it to construct an argument).

Personal Values Attributes (Global / Cultural awareness, Ethics, Curiosity) (PVA):
5. Develop global and cultural awareness through the study of global connections.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed through a poster presentation (weighted 20%), a source analysis of 1,500 words (weighted 30%) and a two-hour exam (weighted 50%). Each component covers Module Learning Outcomes 1 to 5.

You will have the opportunity to present your ideas in the seminars and will receive formative feedback from your lecturer in classroom discussions, debates, and tutorial sessions. Formative assessment through your lecturer will be written and verbal. Feedback on your first summative assessment will allow you to improve on subsequent coursework

Pre-requisite(s)

n/a

Co-requisite(s)

n/a

Module abstract

This module helps you uncover global connections that precedent our present, global age of internet communication, budget airlines, multinational corporations and mass migration. What would it have been like to consume goods such as Chinese tea, American cocoa and tobacco and Oriental coffee when they first arrived in Europe? When did Indian and Thai curries start to include the newly-discovered South American ingredients of chilli peppers and peanuts? How did people find out about exciting new foods, fashions, animals and medicines from the other side of the globe? What was it like to be forced to travel huge distances across the Ocean to end up a slave in the Caribbean or a prisoner in Australia? How did religious beliefs or political ideas spread across the world? How did the global connections of the early modern world shape our world today? This module will help you find out for yourself.

Course info

UCAS Code LV21

Credits 20

Level of Study Undergraduate

Mode of Study 3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department Humanities

Location City Campus, Northumbria University

City Newcastle

Start September 2020

Fee Information

Module Information

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