PP0558 - The Older Person in Health & Social Care systems

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What will I learn on this module?

The Module aims to introduce key theories that attempt to explain “modern ageing”, including the notion of the Third and Fourth Ages, ageism, the diversity of older people, and the impact of professional and political agendas on health and social care policies, and their effect in the delivery of appropriate interventions for individuals and groups. By exploring different social theories, you will consider how societies have attempted to give shape to, the personal lives of older people, and you will develop an understanding how personal experiences of being older are constituted not only through chronological age, but also through issues of social class, (dis)ability, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. This module introduces you to current debates regarding ageing and later life. You will consider historical contexts of “old age, work and welfare”, and debate why some societies expect individuals to stop work at a defined age and the impact this has on their lives. You will debate both the challenges and opportunities ageing societies bring at local, national and global levels, in and around the areas of health and social care, and consider changing societal attitudes as to what constitutes an “older person”, including the impact of the media.

How will I learn on this module?

You will attend a combination of lectures (to outline the main concepts, trends and theories), and seminars. You will also undertake group work, IT Laboratory work, guided and directed study. A variety of materials will be used for example, video, film, newspaper and other media sources as well as texts and your own experiences. You will be encouraged to be self-directing, and you will be expected to engage with directed independent study tasks, as well as working in informal groups to present your ideas. Facilitated group discussions will be integral to the module where you will explore key concepts in more depth to draw out individual and collective analysis. Regular feedback will be given and where necessary you will be seen individually to discuss issues of concern. Advice will be given on how to improve your writing skills, analysis and referencing throughout the module. Problem focused tasks will aim to enable you to apply the principles explored and facilitate the critical exploration of topical issues during the module. Material will be posted regularly on the elp along with web links to relevant online videos, podcasts, documents, and sites of information for you to access as directed and to use as self-directed learning. Online forums and discussion groups will also be introduced to enhance your learning.

How will I be supported academically on this module?

Lecturers will facilitate seminar groups to support academic development. You will have access to lecturers at specifically designated times via online forums; email; group tutorials and one to one meetings. Formative and summative assessment tasks include ‘feedforward’ in preparation for assignments, and ‘feedback’ to identify aspects of students’ strengths and also aspects which require development. Contact details for all tutors for this module are available in the module handbook and via the Electronic Learning Portal (eLP).

What will I be expected to read on this module?

All modules at Northumbria include a range of reading materials that students are expected to engage with. The reading list for this module can be found at: http://readinglists.northumbria.ac.uk
(Reading List service online guide for academic staff this containing contact details for the Reading List team – http://library.northumbria.ac.uk/readinglists)

What will I be expected to achieve?

Knowledge & Understanding:
1. Analyse how experiences of being considered an “older person” are shaped through historical and societal attitudes and expectations of the chronological aging process and its impact on individual’s personal experiences of being older.

2. Critique differing social theories, and their impact on societies attempts to give shape to the personal lives of older people and consider how personal experiences of being older are constituted not only through chronological age, but also by issues of social class, (dis)ability, ethnicity, gender, ‘race’ and sexuality.

3. Debate the impact of professional and political agendas on government policies in the availability and delivery of Health and Social Care services

Intellectual / Professional skills & abilities:
4. Critically examine and reflect upon evidence-based approaches used to inform service provision for people in later life, to maximise their potential for wellbeing and aid their positive adaptation to the ageing process.

Personal Values Attributes (Global / Cultural awareness, Ethics, Curiosity) (PVA):
5. Reflect on, and analyse the impact of, personal and societal stigma and stereotyping on an individual’s perceptions of aging and the quality of life in later life

How will I be assessed?

Formative assessment:
Informal feedback throughout the module during lectures, seminars and group tutorials. Emphasis will be on supporting you in developing confidence in your own abilities to carry out the assigned research and delivery tasks. Levels of support provided will aim to be flexible and responsive to the needs of individual students as they progress through the module.

Mid –way through the Module you will have a structured formative task that will enable you to draw upon your analysis of relevant literature, and rehearse your understandings of the perspectives of older people related to the module themes. You will also be asked to outline different theoretical perspectives that have enhanced your understanding. Learning from this task or tasks will be transferable to the summative assignment.
Summative Assessment
Summative assessment for this module is a single, 3,000 word assignment which is 100% mark. (MLOs 01,02,03,04,05)

You will select your assignment format, in consultation with module staff, from three options to be presented at the start of the module in the handbook. Options will include,

• an agreed critical review of an incident involving “older” people/person,

• an agreed case study involving an individual or group of “older” people,

• a “traditional “academic essay, the title of which will be negotiated with module staff.

Feedback will be via agreed University/Faculty policies and procedures.

Pre-requisite(s)

N/A

Co-requisite(s)

N/A

Module abstract

This module introduces you to current debates regarding ageing and later life. You will consider historical contexts of “old age, work and welfare”, and debate why some societies expect individuals to stop work at a defined age and the impact this has on their lives. You will debate both the challenges and opportunities ageing societies bring at local, national and global levels, in and around the areas of health and social care, and consider changing societal attitudes as to what constitutes an “older person”, including the impact of the media. You will undertake group work, IT Laboratory work, guided and directed study. A variety of materials will be used for example, video, film, newspaper and other media sources as well as texts and your own experiences. You will be encouraged to be self-directing, and you will be expected to engage with directed independent study tasks, as well as working in informal groups to present your ideas. Facilitated group discussions will be integral to the module where you will explore key concepts in more depth to draw out individual and collective analysis

Course info

UCAS Code L5L5

Credits 20

Level of Study Undergraduate

Mode of Study 3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department Social Work, Education & Community Wellbeing

Location Coach Lane Campus, Northumbria University

City Newcastle

Start September 2020

Fee Information

Module Information

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