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What do Nelson Mandela, Hillary Clinton, the Obamas, John Cleese, Rebel Wilson, the CEO of Goldman Sachs and the Head of the National Trust all have in common? They all did a law degree.

Northumbria University’s LLB (Hons) is designed for those looking for a stimulating and engaging law degree. The undergraduate degree provides a thorough grounding in legal principles, including the study of the 7 foundations of legal knowledge which are required to make this a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD). This is the first stage of legal education for those intending to pursue a career as a solicitor or barrister. The foundation subjects are Public Law (Constitutional and Administrative Law), Law of Contract, Crime, Equity and Trusts, EU, Land and Tort. In addition, you will be able choose from a range of specialist options.

All Northumbria law undergraduate students start on the Law (LLB (Hons)) pathway which then provides students with a wide range of programme route choices. Students select their preferred programme route at the end of their second year of study. The route choices available to students at the end of year 2 are: 

  • The 3 year LLB (Hons) route. Students graduating from this route will do so with a qualifying law degree making them eligible to undertake a Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC). The LLB (Hons) route is also available as a 4-year programme in which students can choose to take a placement or study abroad year
  • M Law Exempting route. The M Law (Exempting) programme route is designed for students who intend to pursue a career as a solicitor. This integrated Master of Law programme allows you to combine your LLB (Hons) degree with an exemption from the Legal Practice Course (LPC) and a master’s degree award. 

  • The M Law Exempting (BPTC) route. The M Law Exempting (BPTC) programme route is designed for students who intend to pursue a career as a barrister. This integrated Master of Law programme allows you to combine your LLB (Hons) degree with an exemption from the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) and a master’s degree award. 

    Entry on to the MLaw Exempting (BPTC) route is by application and is contingent on a number of requirements including successful completion of the BCAT aptitude test and admission in to one of the four Inns of Court.

The entire Law programme routes allow students the opportunity to engage with our award winning Student Law Office and to learn from a broad range of professionally qualified and research engaged academic staff. 

An undergraduate law degree is valuable, whether you want to become a lawyer or to choose a different career path and the flexible nature of our programme routes mean you don’t need to make these decisions immediately. Northumbria University’s LLB and MLaw graduates have secured successful careers across the legal sector as well as in various other areas including finance, business and management. 

Study abroad or work placement opportunities on this course also offer professional experience and industry contacts, further enhancing your career prospects. The availability of study abroad or work placements may depend on the route of the programme that you choose to undertake. 

In the Times Good University Guide 2019 Northumbria Law School was ranked in the sector upper quartile for both Teaching Quality (21st) and Student Experience (24th).

Solicitors Regulation Authority

Studying law? Or thinking of studying law?

The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) has announced it will be introducing the Solicitors Qualifying Examination (SQE). The earliest date for introduction is September 2020.

This will be a national assessment for anyone who wants to qualify as a solicitor in England and Wales. It will provide a fair and consistent assessment for all candidates regardless of whether they have taken a law degree or qualified through new routes like the solicitor apprenticeship.

If you have already started your law degree or an exempting law degree, or will do so before the SQE is introduced, you will be able to finish and qualify in the same way as before or qualify under the new system.

Under the current system you must complete both the academic and vocational stages of training as well as meeting the character and suitability requirements to become a solicitor. The academic stage is achieved by either a) a qualifying law degree or b) a non-law degree in a different subject and completing the Common Professional Examination. The vocational stage comprises:

  • The Legal Practice Course
  • A two-year period of recognised training
  • The Professional Skills Course

So what will qualifying look like for solicitors after 2020?

  • Having a degree or equivalent 
  • Two stages of the SQE assessment
  • Having a two-year period of work experience
  • Meeting the character and suitability requirements to become a solicitor

The SRA will be providing information and guidance about how to qualify in the new system so keep checking its website.

Course Information

UCAS Code
M101

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Northumbria Law School

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2020

Fee Information

Module Information

Department / Law

Northumbria Law School is one of the largest law schools in the UK, with a national and international reputation for excellence in legal education for those interested in studying law.

Northumbria Law School

Northumbria Law School is one of the largest law schools in the UK, with a national and international reputation for excellence in legal education for those interested in studying law.

Book an Open Day / Law LLB (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Law LLB. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

This degree is focused on learning the law through a range of innovative approaches. Teaching includes lectures, small group sessions and the use of technology, such as bespoke web-based materials, lecture recordings and electronic reading lists. Innovative use of technology and online support is continually being developed and improved to enhance your learning experience.

What makes this course different to other law degrees is that throughout the course the theory of law and practice are taught together. This approach enhances your understanding of law in its practical context. On this course you’ll be taught the theoretical underpinnings of the foundations of legal knowledge alongside the law in its real world application.

You will have the opportunity to work in the Student Law Office, experiencing legal practice, increasing your understanding of substantive law and developing sophisticated practitioner skills. The Student Law Office is a world leading law clinic, where you will provide free legal services to clients who may have no alternative access to legal representation and justice. So far, the Student Law Office has secured over £1 million in compensation for their clients. In 2013 Northumbria University was awarded a prestigious Queen’s Anniversary Prize for the outstanding community work of the Student Law Office.

We focus on building your skills, developing your critical thinking and increasing your employability together with an understanding of the law. Combining theory and real world application in this way will equip you to take on any professional role.

Law Student Profiles

Hear what it is really like to study our Law LLB (Hons) from our current students.

Book an Open Day / Law LLB (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Law LLB. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

You’ll learn the law from experienced legal practitioners and researchers.

Our staff are active researchers, publishing articles and leading textbooks on a number of legal topics. We have expertise in a range of areas, including our international reputation in the fields of evidence and criminal justice studies.

The quality and expertise of our staff has been recognised through a wide variety of awards and nominations including:

  • Attorney General’s Award
  • Law Teacher of the Year Award
  • Northern Law Awards
  • Student Led Teaching Awards

Staff / Meet the Team

Our students learn from the best - inspirational academic staff with a genuine passion for their subject.

Book an Open Day / Law LLB (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Law LLB. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Northumbria Law School is based in City Campus East, located on a purpose built £70 million, multi-award-winning development in central Newcastle. Our modern building has excellent teaching and learning facilities, including lecture theatres, classrooms and IT hubs, which makes for an inviting workspace. There are a variety of collaborative working zones, where you can work with your fellow students on group projects.

We also have a realistic courtroom in which you can develop your practical advocacy skills and stage mock trials, so you can experience a courtroom environment. Our Law Library contains leading practitioner texts so you can see how the law works in practice.

Find out more about our facilities here.


Northumbria Law School

Northumbria Law School is based in City Campus East, located on a modern state-of-the-art £70 million development in central Newcastle.

Virtual Tour

Come and explore our outstanding facilities in this interactive virtual tour.

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Law LLB (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Law LLB. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

As well as being experienced in legal practice, your tutors are also active researchers. Our academics are at the cutting edge of current legal issues, which enhances your learning experience, giving you the very latest understanding of key legal issues.

Our research rich learning approach promotes development of essential critical thinking skills designed to solve complex problems. Such skills will be valuable to you, whether you pursue a legal career or other graduate level employment.


Book an Open Day / Law LLB (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Law LLB. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

A law degree opens the door to a wealth of professional career opportunities. To enhance your employability you’ll have regular support from our Careers Service, which can assist you to identify your goals and plans.

You can undertake an optional year or semester study abroad, or work placement which will further enhance your prospects. The Student Employability Centre supports your career by promoting volunteering opportunities, placements and overseas study.

We have a range of projects which are sponsored by law firms, giving you the chance to work on live projects and network with legal professionals.

The experience of working in the Student Law Office will enable you to acquire a wide range of high level transferable skills which will equip you for the world of work.

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Law LLB (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Law LLB. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

The course provides a platform to an extensive range of professional careers and graduate level roles. Our range of optional modules allows you to develop areas of specialism tailored to your career aspirations.

Graduates of this course can choose to enter the legal profession and are also able to work in a variety of other sectors including banking, finance and tax advice, legal publishing, central and local government, journalism and personnel work.

Book an Open Day / Law LLB (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Law LLB. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

128-136 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit

Diploma in Foundation Studies Art and Design/Art Design and Media
The Diploma in Foundation Studies Art and Design/Art Design and Media is also accepted in combination with other qualifications

Scottish Highers:

BBBBC - BBBBB at Higher level, BCC - BBB at Advanced Higher

Irish Highers:

ABBBB  - AABBB

IB Diploma:

128-136 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 27 credits at Distinction and 18 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A levels or equivalent.

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.5 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Fees, Scholarships and Discounts

Click here for information on all fees, scholarships and discounts

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Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

GD5010 -

Academic Language Skills for Northumbria Law School (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

LW4000 -

Criminal Law (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop an understanding of the fundamental principles of criminal law and knowledge of key offences and defences. You will consider the nature, scope and function of the criminal law and be introduced to fundamental concepts concerning the elements of criminal liability. You will study key criminal offences with key defences being introduced at appropriate points. Topics relevant to participation in crime and inchoate offences (assisting and encouraging crime, conspiracy and attempt) will also be covered. You will learn how to recognise and locate relevant criminal law cases and statutes using on-line and print resources and how to comprehend, explain and apply the information so obtained. You will develop the ability to explain and analyse the criminal law and will be able to apply its principles to the facts of given scenarios.

This module covers the following topics:

• Elements of criminal liability (actus reus and mens rea)
• Homicide (murder and manslaughter)
• Non-fatal offences against the person (e.g. assault and battery, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, unlawful wounding or inflicting grievous bodily harm and unlawful wounding or causing grievous bodily harm with intent)
• Sexual offences (e.g. rape and sexual assault)
• Offences under the Theft Act 1968 (e.g. theft, robbery and burglary)
• Criminal Damage
• Accomplice liability
• Inchoate offences (assisting and encouraging crime, conspiracy and attempt)
• Liability in criminal law for omission to act
• Defences (e.g. intoxication, automatism, duress and self-defence)

More information

LW4001 -

Approaches to Law and Lawyering Skills (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will be introduced to the key skills and theories required to be a successful law undergraduate. In particular the module focusses on supporting you in making a successful transition to undergraduate study and to develop an understanding of the key academic and legal skills that you will be required to develop.

The module will focus on several key skills including;

- Legal writing
- Practical legal research
- Critical thinking
- Presentation skills (including effective group work)

The module is designed not only to assist you in developing these key skills but also to understand why such skills are important in the context of your wider studies and also how your own learning style can influence the way in which your skills develop. The module is designed to encourage you to consider important concepts such as the importance and value of feedback, critical debate and personal reflection. The module will require you to engage with a range of tasks designed to highlight the importance of these skills to both your undergraduate study and your future professional career and to develop your awareness of how your own learning style can ensure more effective skills development.

More information

LW4002 -

English and European Legal Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This foundational module aims to provide you with a sound practical understanding of the English and European Union legal systems, including their origins, institutions, processes and actors. All key sources of English and European Union law are explained and you will be trained in their retrieval and analysis. Particular attention is given to the techniques of interpreting statutes and legal cases – both domestic and European Sources Union and an understanding of how to use legal sources to substantiate legal arguments. You will have an opportunity to undertake independent research into elements of the English and European Legal Systems.

This module covers the following topics:
• The basic principles of English law, English Legal System and European Union law and the mutual interaction between these legal systems;
• The role of law making bodies such as Parliament and the European Union Institutions;
• The role of the judiciary (UK and Court of Justice of the European Union);
• Statutory interpretation and judicial precedent;
• The preliminary rulings procedure
• The acquisition of legal research skills such as locating legal sources, reflective practice, effective communication and presentation and legal research

More information

LW4003 -

Contract Law (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop an understanding of the law relating to the formation, operation and termination of contracts. You will, through the study of contract, be introduced to the finding, reading and use of a primary source of law, the law report. As the law of Contract is mainly a case law based subject you will be expected to read law reports and extract rules from this source of law. Such law will then be used to analyse problem and essay questions.

This module covers the following topics:

• An overview of the law of contract, its place in the common law and the operation of the doctrine of judicial precedent, and the factors affecting the development of modern contract law.
• Formation of Contract: agreement, certainty, intention to create legal relations and consideration, including promissory estoppel.
• Contents of contract: express and implied terms; interpretation of contracts; exemption clauses and unfair terms.
• Vitiating factors: misrepresentation, mistake, duress and undue influence.
• The doctrine of privity of contract and the exceptions to the doctrine.
• Discharge of contract: performance, breach, agreement and frustration.
• An outline of the law of remedies for breach of contract.
• A brief outline of the law of restitution.

More information

LW4004 -

Key Skills For Employability (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about the following:-
Understanding legal and business organisations
• Understanding of the legal profession and legal/business organisations and their personnel
• Understanding the recruitment process
Making yourself employable
• What employers are looking for
• Where to look for graduate opportunities
• Impact and importance of social media
• Focussing on future career plans, how to decide – strengths and weaknesses
• The opportunities that exist for maximising employability skills
Commercial awareness
• What does it mean?
• Why is it important?
• How do I demonstrate I have it?
Making the application
• An overview of the process
• The purpose of a CV, what it should look like
• A range of CV/application form do’s and don’ts
• Peer and tutor review
You have been long-listed
• The role and purpose of psychometric testing
• To reflect on the results of your psychometric tests
• The use of telephone or skype interviews and do’s and don’ts
You have been short-listed
• Preparing for interview- first impressions; when to listen and when to speak; what might be asked; what to ask them.
Interview Preparation- Practising Interview Questions
• Responding well to interview questions
• Giving and receiving feedback
Assessment centres
• Why firms use them
• Type of tasks and approaches to being successful

More information

LW4005 -

The Criminal Process (20 Credits)

In this module you will develop an understanding of criminal procedure and criminal evidence. You will cover the nature and key stages of the criminal process from arrest to sentencing and possible appeal. You will learn how criminal proceedings are funded and understand the role of the court in criminal litigation and the importance of the Criminal Procedure Rules. You will consider the relevance, admissibility and weight of evidence and examine the major principles which govern the admissibility of evidence in criminal proceedings. You will learn how to recognise and locate relevant cases, statutes, procedural rules and practice directions using on-line and print resources and how to comprehend, explain and apply the information so obtained. You will develop the ability to explain and analyse rules of criminal procedure and criminal evidence and be able to apply their principles to the facts of given scenarios. You will develop basic fact management skills, determining which information in the documents with which you are provided is relevant to solving the problems with which you are presented.

This module covers the following topics:

• The nature and critical stages of the criminal process
• The suspect at the police station
• Funding criminal litigation
• Steps and strategies in preparing for and conducting criminal litigation
• Case analysis
• The Criminal Procedure Rules
• The role of the court in criminal litigation
• Remand and bail
• Allocation
• Summary trial
• Trial on indictment
• Sentencing
• Criminal Appeals
• The admissibility, relevance and weight of evidence
• Burden and standard of proof
• The hearsay rule and its major exceptions
• Confessions
• The accused’s silence
• Competence and compellability
• Examination of witnesses
• Evidence of character
• Identification evidence, unreliable witnesses and lies told by the accused
• Opinion evidence

More information

GD5010 -

Academic Language Skills for Northumbria Law School (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

LW5001 -

Land Law (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about the law governing ‘real’ property also known as land law. You will be introduced to the foundational concepts in land law and then develop your knowledge and understanding by examining in greater depth the major principles of substantive land law.
Topics include:
• Estates and interests in land and the property legislation of 1925
• Registered land
• The landlord/tenant relationship: leases and leasehold covenants
• Co-ownership and the trust of land
• Interests in land: Easements
There is an emphasis on studying the law in the context of realistic problem based scenarios to develop your ability to apply and interpret land law in the wider context of a hypothetical legal case.

The module develops your professional skills and abilities in understanding how to interpret and apply primary and secondary sources of law, especially statutory provisions, to address legal problems.

The module develops your personal value attributes of intellectual independence and independent thinking. You will be encouraged to ask and answer questions about land law and think about its practical implementation in our everyday lives.

More information

LW5002 -

Civil Dispute Resolution (20 Credits)

In this module you will develop a critical understanding of the methods and processes to resolve civil disputes cost-effectively in England and Wales. You will learn about how the contexts in which disputes may arise and the objectives of parties in disputes, and the ways in which those objectives can be met in a cost-effective and proportionate way. Topics include:

? Options for resolving civil disputes: litigation, arbitration, mediation and other forms of ADR

? Costs and funding: Methods of funding, costs consequences, possible liability for costs and cost recoveries

? The Civil Procedure Rules, including Practice Directions, Forms and Court Guides (where appropriate)

? Preliminary considerations: limitation, jurisdiction and applicable law

? Pre-action steps and the court’s expectations about pre-action behaviour

? Commencement: the civil court structure, choice of court, issue and service of proceedings

? Responding to proceedings: acknowledgment of service

? Drafting statements of case

? Early termination: judgments in default, summary judgment, Part 36 and other settlement devices

? Evidence: disclosure and inspection, expert witnesses and witnesses of fact

? The court’s case and costs management powers and duties

? Interim applications and interim remedies

? Preparing for trial or settlement.

? Key elements of trial procedure

? Skills:

o Interviewing

o Fact Management

o Case analysis

o Legal drafting

o Problem-solving

More information

LW5003 -

Tort Law (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop a critical understanding of Tort Law in England and Wales. Tort Law concerns the circumstances in which a person may be liable to provide a remedy to another for the consequences of a civil wrong (other than a breach of contract). You will learn about why and how the law has evolved to create obligations in Tort Law, the shape and extent of those responsibilities and the remedies available for failure to meet those obligations. Topics include:

? An introduction to the nature and function of Tort Law

? Trespass to the person – personal rights to freedom from intentional interference with bodily integrity

? Negligence:

o Duty of care – when a duty of care is owed to another, and the scope of that duty

o Breach of the duty of care – the standard of care expected, and determining when it is met

o Causation and remoteness – the principles determining the extent of responsibility for loss

o Defences – full and partial defences available

o Psychiatric harm – as a particular problematic area in negligence law

? Occupiers’ liability to persons on their premises (lawfully and otherwise)

? Vicarious liability – when a person may be responsible in Tort law for the actions of another person

? Nuisance – the law of private nuisance

? Remedies

You will develop knowledge and critical understanding of Tort Law in these aspects, reading and applying cases, statutes and other material to answer problem questions and essay questions.

More information

LW5004 -

Public Law (Core,20 Credits)

You will develop a critical understanding of the uncodified UK constitution and how it operates. You will critically analyse the doctrines and institutions of the constitution, the checks and balances within the institutions of the state and constitutional change over time. You will develop an understanding of public law within an institutional, national, European and global context. This will build upon the knowledge you have gained in the 1st year module ‘English Legal System and European Union’. You will study both constitutional and administrative law and particularly focus on:

1. Sources and characteristics of the UK constitution
2. Rule of law
3. Parliamentary supremacy
4. Separation of powers
5. Human Rights Act and European Convention on Human Rights
6. Judicial review

More information

LW5006 -

Human Rights and Law Reform (Optional,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about some of the human rights that are protected by law in England and Wales. You will learn about the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and the way in which the Human Rights Act 1998 has affected how human rights are protected. You will achieve detailed knowledge of the law relating to particular topics studied during the course. Topics will be based upon the substantive rights contained in the ECHR but can change to suit topical issues in any given year. For example topics could include some of the following:

• The Right to Life
• Liberty
• The Right to a Fair Trial
• Miscarriages of Justice
• Privacy
• Obscenity
• Freedom of Expression
• Freedom of Association and Assembly
• Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion
• Terrorism Offences
• Sexuality and the Law
• Prisoners’ rights

You will also gain an understanding of areas of law that may need reform and develop and justify your own opinion about what reforms are needed while being able to recognise other potential conclusions.

You will further develop your ability to identify gaps in your knowledge and to ask searching questions about human rights law along with the ability to carry out your own research in this area. Through reflecting on your learning, you will learn more about your own learning and enhance your ability to work independently and with others, a key employability skill. This will, among other benefits, help prepare you for working in the Student Law Office at Level 6.

More information

LW5007 -

Property Issues in Practice (Optional,20 Credits)

You will acquire knowledge and understanding of an aspect of Trusts and Land law.

The module is delivered through Problem Based Learning which develops your ability to work independently and collaboratively and to reflect on your learning. It is a type of experiential learning which is a method of learning that allows you to learn by hands-on experience and reflecting on that experience. Thus you will develop skills in reflective learning, preparing you for the Student Law Office at level 6.

The module develops your professional skills and abilities in relation to interviewing skills, your written communication skills including your ability to organise your written material in a logical and coherent manner and your legal research skills. In addition, it develops key employability skills around group work and the ability to work effectively in a team.

The module develops your personal value attributes of intellectual independence by creating opportunities for you to be able to ask and answer cogent questions about aspects of trusts and land law, identify gaps in your knowledge and acquire new knowledge. In addition, the module develops your independent thinking skills and curiosity.

More information

LW5008 -

Street Law (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is based on experiential learning, or ‘learning by doing’ that allows you to learn by hands-on experience and reflecting on that experience. Street Law is a legal education programme which aims to educate members of the public on their legal rights and responsibilities. You will be presented with a problem, scenario or area of law to investigate and using an enquiry based approach you will independently and collaboratively explore, research and discuss the issue. You will then produce an artefact (such as a legal information leaflet which could be used by the public or in house) and/or deliver the findings to others (for example by the preparation and delivery of a lesson in a school or in house). You will construct your own learning goals and research objectives albeit with the needs of your audience (the members of the public benefiting from your work) in mind.

Skills employed will include research, written and oral communication including your ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner appropriate for your audience and team/group work. You will develop skills in reflective learning preparing you for the Student Law Office at level 6.

More information

LW5009 -

Inquests (Optional,20 Credits)

On this module you will have the opportunity to learn about the role of the coroner in England and Wales and the law relating to inquests. You will be able to study and examine the historical origins of the inquest as well as consider the present law. The lectures will provide a broad framework, however, within this framework the module is experiential in that you will be required to identify topics for additional and further in depth study and will be supported in researching, evaluating and analysing your findings.

The module is divided into 4 areas of enquiry:

• Historical perspectives- where you will have an opportunity to look at a particular period of the historical development of the coroner’s court/inquests. The module concentrates on the medieval period and the Victorian era but you are encouraged to explore an historical period that interests you.
• Notable inquests- you will investigate a notable inquest in depth (examples could include the death of Mark Duggan, the Hillsborough Inquest, The Marchioness Disaster or the death of Stephen Lawrence)
• Reform- you will consider and discuss the recent reform to the inquest system and in particular the Coroners and Justice Act 2009
• Practice and procedure- you will learn about the process of appearing at an inquest and will have an opportunity to take part in a simulated inquest to put your research into practice.

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LW5010 -

Trials of Dissenters (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will encourage you to place the ‘trial of dissent’ into a historical, political, social, economic, and cultural context. You will examine how the notions of orthodoxy and dissent have been characterised over time, through the study of several famous trials. By analysing selected trials and placing them within their historical and social contexts you will see how the law can be used to further political or social ends, and how prosecutors and defendants have used the resources and forensic skills available to them to support and resist the imposition of orthodox views.

You will look at the trials of dissenters in relation to several themes – religious; political; gender; literary; and scientific dissent. You will study a minimum of two trials for each theme. For example, for the concept of trial for dissent from religious orthodoxy you can study the trial of Socrates in Athens in 399 B.C.E, and twentieth-century blasphemy trials. On political offences, the trials of Thomas Paine in England in the late eighteenth-century, and the trials of the Suffragettes in the twentieth century are possible subjects. Scientific dissent can involve an analysis of the trials of Galileo Galilei and John Scopes. The concept of gender dissent is explored through a study of those considered to have contravened gender/sexual orientation norms; this might include, for example, the trials of Anne Boleyn and Oscar Wilde. Literary dissent may include the trial of Radclyffe Hall, or proceedings relating to publication of D.H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover for example.

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LW5011 -

Jurisprudence (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about a range of legal and related theories. These areas will involve a range of activities including: reading and understanding key theoretical works, engaging with surrounding academic articles and considering the strengths and weaknesses of these theories.

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LW5012 -

Law and Literature (Optional,20 Credits)

Through discussion of a variety of carefully chosen texts you will find new ways to think about law and the institutions of law. You will learn about the varieties of ways in which the relationship between law and literature has been explored by legal academics (law as literature and in literature). Applying these ideas, you will be encouraged at all stages to reflect on your own relationship with the legal system, its function within our society and the values and attributes of the profession.

Topics will include:

• Introduction and orientation. What is law and literature?
• Trials and abuses
• Custom, conflict and dispute resolution
• Play readings
• Justice as ordeal: trials, witches and spies
• Utopias, Dystopias and Terrorism
• Legal ethics: what is a ‘good lawyer’?
• Legal theory in literature lecture – The Name of the Rose
• Kafka: The Trial

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LW5013 -

Gender, Sexuality, and Law (Optional,20 Credits)

The module seeks to explore contemporary theories of sexuality and to undertake a selective investigation of the ways in which sexuality has been posed and addressed as a problem in law through socio-legal analysis. You will explore contemporary debates relating to sexuality and gender drawing on theory, but placing them in a ‘real world’ context, enabling you to understand how the law seeks to respond to these issues, and how it might respond in the future.

Each year members of staff will choose the most topical areas to be studied on the syllabus. Some topics will be changed to reflect the current issues of the day. Subjects that might be explored in a year include a selection from: feminist and queer theory, reproductive rights, same-sex marriage/relationship status rights, trans rights, sex work/prostitution, non-normative sexual behaviours (e.g. public sex), pornography, queer space and legal geographies, bareback sex and HIV transmission, employment rights, adoption rights and paedophilia/inter-generational sex.

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LW5014 -

Animal Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the law and ethics relating to animals. Within the field of animal welfare, law and ethics are intertwined. It is only by examining our ethical duties towards animals that we can assess whether the existing animal protection laws are sufficient and if not, what law reform is needed. You will examine a number of case studies, for example, the use of animals in agriculture, to illustrate the link between law and ethics. A selection of ethical theories e.g. Singer’s utilitarian theory and Regan’s rights theory, will be critically analysed and applied to the case studies. This will allow for a critical examination of the relevant law to assess whether it is adequate to protect animals. There will be scope for some comparative analysis of animal protection law in other countries. You will also examine the arguments for and against granting legal personhood to some animals. All domestic and captive animals are legal things but there have been a growing number of international cases in recent years challenging their legal status, for example, the case of the chimpanzee, Tommy, in the USA. This debate raises the question of the nature of legal rights and the basis on which we grant them to others.

The module develops your professional skills and abilities in being able to effectively organise and communicate information orally and in writing to both specialist and non-specialist audiences. You will have the opportunity to give oral presentations in seminars to non-specialist audiences (your peers) and your written communication skills will be developed in the summative assessment where you will be writing to a specialist audience.

The module develops your personal value attributes of ethics and global awareness as well as intellectual independence and independent thinking. You will be encouraged to ask and answer questions about the law and ethics relating to animals and to challenge the way you think about our use and treatment of animals. The module develops curiosity and challenges you to think critically about our everyday use of animals.

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LW5112 -

Northumbria Law School Study Abroad Semester (Optional,60 Credits)

The Northumbria Law School Study Abroad Semester module is a 60 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad semester which is taken in Semester 2 of Year 2. You will undertake a period of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the study abroad is recognised in your transcript as a 60 credit Study Abroad Module The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

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MO9522 -

The Marketing and Logistics Interface (Optional,20 Credits)

The module aims to provide you with the knowledge and skills of applying a variety of Marketing and Logistics knowledge at the subject interface to support business decision making in this area. The module is delivered to you using weekly lectures and seminars, principally concentrating on the development of your subject skills and interpretation of the subject area. Within this module, you will cover ten main topics:

• The Global Customer;
• Overcoming Marketing/ Logistic interface barriers;
• The era of Network Competition; Logistics / Marketing Customer Value;
• Synchronous Supply;
• Managing Risk at the Marketing/Logistics Interface;
• Evaluating Market Channels;
• Channel Design;
• Logistics in the world of e-business;
• Digital Marketing and Logistics

The module will lead you to the development of subject specific skills and confidence in handling the knowledge gained. In doing so, it will expose you to a wide range of subject techniques in the Marketing and Logistics subject area. You will become aware of the role of the subject in the business context. Furthermore, you will gain an understanding of the role of the Marketing and Logistics functions and the development of various business problem solving models related to these areas.

On completing the module you will be able to select and apply the appropriate techniques to support business problem solving in a variety of situations. You will have developed relevant skills to support the theoretical material introduced throughout the module. You will create and design appropriate models as well as the use of appropriate theory.

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NX9524 -

Digital Business (Optional,20 Credits)

Throughout this module you will be introduced to the opportunities and challenges posed by doing business in an increasingly digital domain. This module is designed to give you an understanding of how using online channels impacts upon different parts of the organisation, and will in particular focus upon 3 core areas of business:
Digital Business Strategy: You will develop an understanding of the cost structures associated with using digital channels, different business models (including omni and multiple channel business strategies), distance issues around serving global markets and implications in terms of taxation and service delivery.
Marketing: In this part of the module you will consider changing consumer media consumption and behaviour; social media and m-commerce; customer relationship building in an online context, digital brand communities and performance metrics.
Supply Chain Management and Information Systems: You will also develop and appreciation of the role of supply chains in serving global markets, addressing issues such as the application of various systems to facilitate digital transactions (e.g. ERP, CRM) and issues related to web performance (e.g. web design and google analytics).

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LW5111 -

Northumbria Law School Study Abroad Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Northumbria Law School Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study between levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

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LW5113 -

Northumbria Law School Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Northumbria Law School Work Placement Year module is a full year 120 credit module available on degree courses which include a work placement year which is taken as an additional year of study between levels 5 and 6 (the length of the placement will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks and no more than 52 weeks). You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the training agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

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LW5003 -

Tort Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop a critical understanding of Tort Law in England and Wales. Tort Law concerns the circumstances in which a person may be liable to provide a remedy to another for the consequences of a civil wrong (other than a breach of contract). You will learn about why and how the law has evolved to create obligations in Tort Law, the shape and extent of those responsibilities and the remedies available for failure to meet those obligations. Topics include:

? An introduction to the nature and function of Tort Law

? Trespass to the person – personal rights to freedom from intentional interference with bodily integrity

? Negligence:

o Duty of care – when a duty of care is owed to another, and the scope of that duty

o Breach of the duty of care – the standard of care expected, and determining when it is met

o Causation and remoteness – the principles determining the extent of responsibility for loss

o Defences – full and partial defences available

o Psychiatric harm – as a particular problematic area in negligence law

? Occupiers’ liability to persons on their premises (lawfully and otherwise)

? Vicarious liability – when a person may be responsible in Tort law for the actions of another person

? Nuisance – the law of private nuisance

? Remedies

You will develop knowledge and critical understanding of Tort Law in these aspects, reading and applying cases, statutes and other material to answer problem questions and essay questions.

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LW6000 -

Equity and Trusts (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the substantive law of Equity and Trusts. It begins with an historical overview of the development of equity. This is followed by study of the creation of trusts (both express and implied). The next topic is Charitable trusts, an area which lends itself well to critical analysis. Next is a non-charitable purpose trust where students study the situations in which these trusts can be valid. You will then study the powers and duties of trustees, breach of trust and the remedies for this including tracing and equitable remedies. A critical approach is fostered throughout.

The creation of express trusts (including capacity, formalities, certainty and constitution)
Resulting and constructive trusts
Charitable trusts
Non-charitable purpose trusts
Trustees’ powers and duties
Breach of trust
Fiduciary relationships and fiduciary obligations
Tracing and Equitable remedies

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LW6001 -

Student Law Office (Core,60 Credits)

This module is based on experiential learning, or ‘learning through doing’. In this module, through real and simulated experiences with clients, you will develop a range of key lawyering skills, as well as effective workplace skills and enhancing your own interpersonal skills.
You will also work with your supervisor to develop the ability to reflect on your learning. This reflection is at the heart of the clinical experience, enabling you to understand your own learning process, and to fit your individual experiences into a wider context of personal and professional ethics and practice, and the social and economic contexts of law.

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LW6007 -

Intellectual Property Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about a range of laws protecting and regulating IP, including copyright, trade marks, passing off, patents, design rights & breach of confidence. These areas will involve a range of activities including: reading and applying cases, legal interpretation, addressing essay questions and problem questions.

Upon completion of his module you will be able to show the following (level 6 learning outcomes):
1) A systematic & in-depth knowledge of key aspects of IP law, demonstrating detailed and coherent understanding
2) An ability to recognise and apply some of the current theories and critical scholarship at the forefront of IP law
3) An ability to consolidate & apply your knowledge of IP law to complex legal problems in order to find solutions
4) An ability to conduct self-directed research including accurate indentification of issues, the retrieval and evaluation of relevant, current information from a range of sources
5) An ability to show curiosity and awareness of the cultural & political impacts of IP laws by exercising your own intiative and ethical judgment

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LW6008 -

Sale of Goods and Consumer Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the law relating to the supply of goods and services in both non-consumer and consumer contexts. You will also learn about consumer law and how criminal and civil laws protect consumers’ rights. You will develop the ability to understand, explain and apply the law in a practical context.
This module covers the following topics:
• the sale and supply of goods and services in both consumer and non-consumer contracts;
• how and when property passes in a sale of goods contract;
• online and distance selling;
• unfair contract terms;
• consumer safety and unfair trading practices – how criminal and civil law protects consumers and how businesses must comply with the law;
• consumer credit – types of agreement, formation and termination of agreements and creditors’ liability; and
• enforcement of consumer rights.

On this module you will be:
• researching, reading, analysing and discussing cases and statutes;
• considering and answering problem questions in both lectures and workshops;
• developing your oral communication skills in workshops; and
• developing your written communication skills when preparing for workshops and producing work for feedback.

You will gain a wide perspective on the areas covered by this module by developing an appreciation of the relationship between civil, criminal, administrative and self-regulatory controls.

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LW6010 -

Commercial Contracts (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about the key issues and consequences relevant to conducting business successfully in the modern world. You will learn how commercial contracts can be used as a risk management tool, how to exercise professional judgement and you will become more commercially aware. You will also learn about how businesses use marketing arrangements to increase sales and how competition law impacts on these arrangements. As you examine commercial contracts in realistic practical contexts you will learn about drafting issues and consequences in standard form contracts, how to allocate risk and you will develop an awareness of current issues and developments in the commercial environment.

Topics include:
• commercial sales of goods contracts;
• passing of property and allocation of risk in commercial contracts;
• express terms, implied terms and exclusion clauses;
• performance of the contract;
• consequences of breach of contract,
• agency and the Commercial Agents (Council Directive) Regulations 1993
• distribution agreements; and
• EU competition law – Article 101 of the Treaty of the Functioning of the European Union

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LW6011 -

Medical Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop a critical understanding of medical law in England and Wales. The module will examine the legal framework that governs medical treatment and will focus on statute and common law. In addition the module will consider key ethical issues raised by these matters, including the influence of professional guidance in this area.

This module covers the following topics:
1. Relationship between law and ethics; resolution of disputes other than by way of clinical negligence, for example contract and judicial review
2. Clinical Negligence
3. Medical Confidentiality.
4. Consent to medical treatment.
5. The Beginning of Life.
(a) contraception
(b) pre-natal negligence
6. Abortion
7. The End of Life.
(a) Neonaticide;
(b) Euthanasia and assisted suicide
(c) Treatment withdrawal

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LW6012 -

Family Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the range of laws, case law and practice developed in England and Wales to deal with matters arising from the breakdown of family relationships, including divorce, dissolution of a civil partnership, financial relief remedies, child maintenance, children, domestic abuse and cohabitees.
These areas will involve a range of activities including : reading, interpreting and applying statute and case law to practical scenarios, drafting court documents and developing writing skills in essay style questions.

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LW6014 -

Introduction to Comparative and International Criminal Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop critical understanding of substantive criminal law of the major legal systems of the world. You will learn different methods and techniques of comparative law and its significance to the development of domestic criminal law as well as to the work of the International Criminal Tribunals, namely, the International Criminal Court (ICC), the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. The module will take a critical look at the elements of crimes, individual criminal responsibility, and modes of participation from comparative and international criminal law perspectives.

This module covers the following topics:

• Introduction to Comparative Criminal Law;
• Comparative Analysis of Mens Rea Standards in Common Legal Systems, Romano/Germanic Legal Systems, Islamic Legal Traditions and International Criminal Law
• Comparative Analysis of Different Modes of Participation in Criminal Offences with Particular Focus on Joint Criminal Enterprise in Common Law Systems and Co-Perpetration & the Control Over the Crime Theory in German Criminal Law and their Application by International Criminal Courts and Tribunals
• Elements of International Crimes, i.e. Genocide and Crimes against Humanity
• General Principles of Law in the Jurisprudence of the ICTY, ICTR and ICC: Examining the Relevant Case Law of these Tribunals and the Techniques adopted by International Judges in their Search of General Principles of Law Derived from National Legal Systems of the World

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LW6017 -

Employment Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop knowledge and understanding of the laws governing the relationship between a person, the employee, who works for another person, the employer. Working relationships come in many different guises, so drawing a precise boundary around the subject can be difficult but you will engage with some of the current theories and emerging themes surrounding the modern employment relationship. In this module you will learn about the following:-

The Scope of Employment Law (and what is Labour Law?)
• Why do we have employment law?
• Sources of law
• Current themes/ theories in employment law

The scope of labour law and the employment relationship
• The organising concepts used in English employment law
• Non-standard working relationships
• The contract of employment

Equality
• Core concepts
• Protected characteristics
• Application and enforcement

Pay
• Contractual remuneration
• National minimum wage
• Equal pay

Job security
• Termination of the employment relationship
• Unfair dismissal
• Wrongful dismissal
Business Re-organisations
• Redundancy
• Business transfers and changes of ownership

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LW6020 -

Company Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop an in depth knowledge and understanding of key aspects of company law in England and Wales. You will learn about the most important types of companies: private companies that are privately owned and public companies that can offer their shares to the general public and may be listed on a stock exchange. You will develop a critical awareness of current issues and an understanding of the perspectives and wider debates about the nature of company law.
This module covers the following topics:
• types and classification of companies;
• incorporation and the nature of corporate personality;
• the role of directors in managing a company and directors’ duties;
• financing: raising capital by issuing shares and the role and rights of shareholders;
• the corporate governance debate and public companies; and
• company insolvency.
In terms of skills development, you will read and apply company law cases, interpret statutory provisions and consider some of the relevant academic articles in this area.

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LW6022 -

International Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about international law - the law of nations. Beginning with an overview of the basics of international law - treaties and customary law, state responsibility, and jurisdiction - you will then progress through a series of case studies (on diplomatic immunities, the use of force, the law of armed conflict, international criminal law, international human rights law, and international economic law) to develop your knowledge of how those basic principles are applied. You will also develop an understanding of the international legal elements of current international events through these case studies.

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LW6025 -

Sports Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the theory, law and practice of sports law in England and Wales (including EU law and the World Anti-Doping Code). The module builds on knowledge gathered in the compulsory subjects of Contract, EU law, Criminal Law and Tort but also introduces students to other legal disciplines such as Employment Law. You will study the role of consent as a defence to what would otherwise be criminal liability for injuries incurred in the context of contact sports (such as football, ice hockey and rugby) and combat sports. You will study the causes and implications of the major 20th century sports stadium disasters including Valley Parade and Hillsborough. You will learn about the law applicable to football hooligans and consider the compatibility of some of these measures with the Human Rights Act. You will study the civil liability of (i) sports participants to each other and (ii) match officials, sports club owners, event organisers and governing bodies to sports participants, spectators and people living in close proximity to sports venues, which will engage your knowledge of negligence, nuisance and occupiers’ liability. You will examine the impact of EU Law on sport (in particular the right of free movement of workers in football and challenges to nationality quotas), the role of the Equality Act 2010 in tackling discrimination in sport, and the legal implications of doping in sport. Although the module has a UK focus it has a global scope and reference will be made to important developments overseas.

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LW6026 -

Legal History (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module, through the study of certain selected themes, you will develop a critical awareness of the role of law in society. You will be able to see in an historical context how social conditions are reflected in common law and legislation, and how law affects societal relations. The module explores the interplay between law and society, but includes detailed consideration of selected statutory material and cases.

Subject areas can include:

• Crime and the criminal law in the medieval period: crime and medieval society; public order; law enforcement; punishment; outlaws.
• Crime and the criminal law 1550 – 1700: the role of the criminal law in maintaining the norms of behaviour in a period of economic, social and political tension. Specific topics include witchcraft, homicide, judicial and community punishment.
• Treason: development of substantive law and evidential requirements. Trials considered concentrate on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, such as Sir Thomas More, Anthony Babington, Charles I or Lord Russell.
• Women and the law: women as victims and perpetrators of criminal offences; changing treatment of female criminality by the secular and the church courts; impact of marriage on women’s legal status.
• Development of the legal professions: origins of the various types of legal practice; Inns of Court; legal education.
• Development of the courts: functions of the courts; role of the justices; development of judicial costume.
• Constitutional development: 1066 to Magna Carta; during the Tudor period; the Stuarts and the struggle between the Crown, the Common Law and Parliament.

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LW6028 -

International Family Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will gain an analytical and practical insight into the rationale and jurisprudence of family law as it affects families and individuals across Europe and the rest of the world. Specifically, the module will examine how the law regulates family law issues with an international dimension, how the law in England and Wales compares with the law in other jurisdictions and how international laws and treaties relating to family law are implemented, interpreted and enforced.

The issues that will be explored include:

• Choice of law and jurisdiction
• International child abduction
• Recognition and enforcement of Judgments in other jurisdictions
• Female Genital Mutilation
• Forced Marriage
• Marriage validity and religious marriage contracts

By participating in this module, you will also be encouraged to prepare blog articles for the module tutors’ blog in this area, A Family Affair, which can be accessed at: https://afamilyaffairsite.wordpress.com. You will also be encouraged to attend regular documentary screenings around wider international family law issues and participate in discussion around these issues. The screenings will examine topics such as honour based violence, traditional harmful practices, and culturally specific forms of domestic violence. Participation in these non-compulsory activities will allow you to develop your professional skills and participate in wider debates about the issues raised in the module.

No prior knowledge of family law or international law will be required. This module complements other subjects offered at this stage in your programme, including family law, child care and international human rights law.

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LW6036 -

The Law of Outer Space (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with a detailed understanding of the way in which space exploration is governed on a national and international level. The module will examine the governance of traditional space activity: the development of satellite communications, military activity in space, the use of interplanetary probes to gain scientific data and also human spaceflight. You will also evaluate legal responses to the challenges posed by new developments such as space tourism, space mining and the increased environmental strain on the space environment.

The issues that will be explored include:

• Introducing International Space Law; The Outer Space Treaty & follow up treaties
• Astropolitics, International Relations and Policy in Space
• The Institutions of Space Administration
• Environmental Space Law
• The Moon and Other Celestial Bodies
• Planetary Protection
• Astronauts and Space Travellers and Tourism
• Space Mining
• National Space Legislation
• Military Space Activity
You will be encouraged to immerse yourself in the space environment and formative assessment will be by means of preparing blog posts for the module tutor’s blog The Legal Spaceman. There are also external blogs which encourage student submissions. There will be guest lectures by experts in the field of space exploration. Study on this module is predicated on an interest in wider issues surrounding space exploration.

No prior knowledge of space law will be required. An awareness of international law will be useful but is not essential. This module complements other subjects offered at this stage in your programme, and will also provide you with policy and international relations perspectives.

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Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

GD5010 -

Academic Language Skills for Northumbria Law School (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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LW4000 -

Criminal Law (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop an understanding of the fundamental principles of criminal law and knowledge of key offences and defences. You will consider the nature, scope and function of the criminal law and be introduced to fundamental concepts concerning the elements of criminal liability. You will study key criminal offences with key defences being introduced at appropriate points. Topics relevant to participation in crime and inchoate offences (assisting and encouraging crime, conspiracy and attempt) will also be covered. You will learn how to recognise and locate relevant criminal law cases and statutes using on-line and print resources and how to comprehend, explain and apply the information so obtained. You will develop the ability to explain and analyse the criminal law and will be able to apply its principles to the facts of given scenarios.

This module covers the following topics:

• Elements of criminal liability (actus reus and mens rea)
• Homicide (murder and manslaughter)
• Non-fatal offences against the person (e.g. assault and battery, assault occasioning actual bodily harm, unlawful wounding or inflicting grievous bodily harm and unlawful wounding or causing grievous bodily harm with intent)
• Sexual offences (e.g. rape and sexual assault)
• Offences under the Theft Act 1968 (e.g. theft, robbery and burglary)
• Criminal Damage
• Accomplice liability
• Inchoate offences (assisting and encouraging crime, conspiracy and attempt)
• Liability in criminal law for omission to act
• Defences (e.g. intoxication, automatism, duress and self-defence)

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LW4001 -

Approaches to Law and Lawyering Skills (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will be introduced to the key skills and theories required to be a successful law undergraduate. In particular the module focusses on supporting you in making a successful transition to undergraduate study and to develop an understanding of the key academic and legal skills that you will be required to develop.

The module will focus on several key skills including;

- Legal writing
- Practical legal research
- Critical thinking
- Presentation skills (including effective group work)

The module is designed not only to assist you in developing these key skills but also to understand why such skills are important in the context of your wider studies and also how your own learning style can influence the way in which your skills develop. The module is designed to encourage you to consider important concepts such as the importance and value of feedback, critical debate and personal reflection. The module will require you to engage with a range of tasks designed to highlight the importance of these skills to both your undergraduate study and your future professional career and to develop your awareness of how your own learning style can ensure more effective skills development.

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LW4002 -

English and European Legal Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This foundational module aims to provide you with a sound practical understanding of the English and European Union legal systems, including their origins, institutions, processes and actors. All key sources of English and European Union law are explained and you will be trained in their retrieval and analysis. Particular attention is given to the techniques of interpreting statutes and legal cases – both domestic and European Sources Union and an understanding of how to use legal sources to substantiate legal arguments. You will have an opportunity to undertake independent research into elements of the English and European Legal Systems.

This module covers the following topics:
• The basic principles of English law, English Legal System and European Union law and the mutual interaction between these legal systems;
• The role of law making bodies such as Parliament and the European Union Institutions;
• The role of the judiciary (UK and Court of Justice of the European Union);
• Statutory interpretation and judicial precedent;
• The preliminary rulings procedure
• The acquisition of legal research skills such as locating legal sources, reflective practice, effective communication and presentation and legal research

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LW4003 -

Contract Law (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop an understanding of the law relating to the formation, operation and termination of contracts. You will, through the study of contract, be introduced to the finding, reading and use of a primary source of law, the law report. As the law of Contract is mainly a case law based subject you will be expected to read law reports and extract rules from this source of law. Such law will then be used to analyse problem and essay questions.

This module covers the following topics:

• An overview of the law of contract, its place in the common law and the operation of the doctrine of judicial precedent, and the factors affecting the development of modern contract law.
• Formation of Contract: agreement, certainty, intention to create legal relations and consideration, including promissory estoppel.
• Contents of contract: express and implied terms; interpretation of contracts; exemption clauses and unfair terms.
• Vitiating factors: misrepresentation, mistake, duress and undue influence.
• The doctrine of privity of contract and the exceptions to the doctrine.
• Discharge of contract: performance, breach, agreement and frustration.
• An outline of the law of remedies for breach of contract.
• A brief outline of the law of restitution.

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LW4004 -

Key Skills For Employability (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about the following:-
Understanding legal and business organisations
• Understanding of the legal profession and legal/business organisations and their personnel
• Understanding the recruitment process
Making yourself employable
• What employers are looking for
• Where to look for graduate opportunities
• Impact and importance of social media
• Focussing on future career plans, how to decide – strengths and weaknesses
• The opportunities that exist for maximising employability skills
Commercial awareness
• What does it mean?
• Why is it important?
• How do I demonstrate I have it?
Making the application
• An overview of the process
• The purpose of a CV, what it should look like
• A range of CV/application form do’s and don’ts
• Peer and tutor review
You have been long-listed
• The role and purpose of psychometric testing
• To reflect on the results of your psychometric tests
• The use of telephone or skype interviews and do’s and don’ts
You have been short-listed
• Preparing for interview- first impressions; when to listen and when to speak; what might be asked; what to ask them.
Interview Preparation- Practising Interview Questions
• Responding well to interview questions
• Giving and receiving feedback
Assessment centres
• Why firms use them
• Type of tasks and approaches to being successful

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LW4005 -

The Criminal Process (20 Credits)

In this module you will develop an understanding of criminal procedure and criminal evidence. You will cover the nature and key stages of the criminal process from arrest to sentencing and possible appeal. You will learn how criminal proceedings are funded and understand the role of the court in criminal litigation and the importance of the Criminal Procedure Rules. You will consider the relevance, admissibility and weight of evidence and examine the major principles which govern the admissibility of evidence in criminal proceedings. You will learn how to recognise and locate relevant cases, statutes, procedural rules and practice directions using on-line and print resources and how to comprehend, explain and apply the information so obtained. You will develop the ability to explain and analyse rules of criminal procedure and criminal evidence and be able to apply their principles to the facts of given scenarios. You will develop basic fact management skills, determining which information in the documents with which you are provided is relevant to solving the problems with which you are presented.

This module covers the following topics:

• The nature and critical stages of the criminal process
• The suspect at the police station
• Funding criminal litigation
• Steps and strategies in preparing for and conducting criminal litigation
• Case analysis
• The Criminal Procedure Rules
• The role of the court in criminal litigation
• Remand and bail
• Allocation
• Summary trial
• Trial on indictment
• Sentencing
• Criminal Appeals
• The admissibility, relevance and weight of evidence
• Burden and standard of proof
• The hearsay rule and its major exceptions
• Confessions
• The accused’s silence
• Competence and compellability
• Examination of witnesses
• Evidence of character
• Identification evidence, unreliable witnesses and lies told by the accused
• Opinion evidence

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GD5010 -

Academic Language Skills for Northumbria Law School (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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LW5001 -

Land Law (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about the law governing ‘real’ property also known as land law. You will be introduced to the foundational concepts in land law and then develop your knowledge and understanding by examining in greater depth the major principles of substantive land law.
Topics include:
• Estates and interests in land and the property legislation of 1925
• Registered land
• The landlord/tenant relationship: leases and leasehold covenants
• Co-ownership and the trust of land
• Interests in land: Easements
There is an emphasis on studying the law in the context of realistic problem based scenarios to develop your ability to apply and interpret land law in the wider context of a hypothetical legal case.

The module develops your professional skills and abilities in understanding how to interpret and apply primary and secondary sources of law, especially statutory provisions, to address legal problems.

The module develops your personal value attributes of intellectual independence and independent thinking. You will be encouraged to ask and answer questions about land law and think about its practical implementation in our everyday lives.

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LW5002 -

Civil Dispute Resolution (20 Credits)

In this module you will develop a critical understanding of the methods and processes to resolve civil disputes cost-effectively in England and Wales. You will learn about how the contexts in which disputes may arise and the objectives of parties in disputes, and the ways in which those objectives can be met in a cost-effective and proportionate way. Topics include:

? Options for resolving civil disputes: litigation, arbitration, mediation and other forms of ADR

? Costs and funding: Methods of funding, costs consequences, possible liability for costs and cost recoveries

? The Civil Procedure Rules, including Practice Directions, Forms and Court Guides (where appropriate)

? Preliminary considerations: limitation, jurisdiction and applicable law

? Pre-action steps and the court’s expectations about pre-action behaviour

? Commencement: the civil court structure, choice of court, issue and service of proceedings

? Responding to proceedings: acknowledgment of service

? Drafting statements of case

? Early termination: judgments in default, summary judgment, Part 36 and other settlement devices

? Evidence: disclosure and inspection, expert witnesses and witnesses of fact

? The court’s case and costs management powers and duties

? Interim applications and interim remedies

? Preparing for trial or settlement.

? Key elements of trial procedure

? Skills:

o Interviewing

o Fact Management

o Case analysis

o Legal drafting

o Problem-solving

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LW5003 -

Tort Law (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop a critical understanding of Tort Law in England and Wales. Tort Law concerns the circumstances in which a person may be liable to provide a remedy to another for the consequences of a civil wrong (other than a breach of contract). You will learn about why and how the law has evolved to create obligations in Tort Law, the shape and extent of those responsibilities and the remedies available for failure to meet those obligations. Topics include:

? An introduction to the nature and function of Tort Law

? Trespass to the person – personal rights to freedom from intentional interference with bodily integrity

? Negligence:

o Duty of care – when a duty of care is owed to another, and the scope of that duty

o Breach of the duty of care – the standard of care expected, and determining when it is met

o Causation and remoteness – the principles determining the extent of responsibility for loss

o Defences – full and partial defences available

o Psychiatric harm – as a particular problematic area in negligence law

? Occupiers’ liability to persons on their premises (lawfully and otherwise)

? Vicarious liability – when a person may be responsible in Tort law for the actions of another person

? Nuisance – the law of private nuisance

? Remedies

You will develop knowledge and critical understanding of Tort Law in these aspects, reading and applying cases, statutes and other material to answer problem questions and essay questions.

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LW5004 -

Public Law (Core,20 Credits)

You will develop a critical understanding of the uncodified UK constitution and how it operates. You will critically analyse the doctrines and institutions of the constitution, the checks and balances within the institutions of the state and constitutional change over time. You will develop an understanding of public law within an institutional, national, European and global context. This will build upon the knowledge you have gained in the 1st year module ‘English Legal System and European Union’. You will study both constitutional and administrative law and particularly focus on:

1. Sources and characteristics of the UK constitution
2. Rule of law
3. Parliamentary supremacy
4. Separation of powers
5. Human Rights Act and European Convention on Human Rights
6. Judicial review

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LW5006 -

Human Rights and Law Reform (Optional,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about some of the human rights that are protected by law in England and Wales. You will learn about the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and the way in which the Human Rights Act 1998 has affected how human rights are protected. You will achieve detailed knowledge of the law relating to particular topics studied during the course. Topics will be based upon the substantive rights contained in the ECHR but can change to suit topical issues in any given year. For example topics could include some of the following:

• The Right to Life
• Liberty
• The Right to a Fair Trial
• Miscarriages of Justice
• Privacy
• Obscenity
• Freedom of Expression
• Freedom of Association and Assembly
• Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion
• Terrorism Offences
• Sexuality and the Law
• Prisoners’ rights

You will also gain an understanding of areas of law that may need reform and develop and justify your own opinion about what reforms are needed while being able to recognise other potential conclusions.

You will further develop your ability to identify gaps in your knowledge and to ask searching questions about human rights law along with the ability to carry out your own research in this area. Through reflecting on your learning, you will learn more about your own learning and enhance your ability to work independently and with others, a key employability skill. This will, among other benefits, help prepare you for working in the Student Law Office at Level 6.

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LW5007 -

Property Issues in Practice (Optional,20 Credits)

You will acquire knowledge and understanding of an aspect of Trusts and Land law.

The module is delivered through Problem Based Learning which develops your ability to work independently and collaboratively and to reflect on your learning. It is a type of experiential learning which is a method of learning that allows you to learn by hands-on experience and reflecting on that experience. Thus you will develop skills in reflective learning, preparing you for the Student Law Office at level 6.

The module develops your professional skills and abilities in relation to interviewing skills, your written communication skills including your ability to organise your written material in a logical and coherent manner and your legal research skills. In addition, it develops key employability skills around group work and the ability to work effectively in a team.

The module develops your personal value attributes of intellectual independence by creating opportunities for you to be able to ask and answer cogent questions about aspects of trusts and land law, identify gaps in your knowledge and acquire new knowledge. In addition, the module develops your independent thinking skills and curiosity.

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LW5008 -

Street Law (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is based on experiential learning, or ‘learning by doing’ that allows you to learn by hands-on experience and reflecting on that experience. Street Law is a legal education programme which aims to educate members of the public on their legal rights and responsibilities. You will be presented with a problem, scenario or area of law to investigate and using an enquiry based approach you will independently and collaboratively explore, research and discuss the issue. You will then produce an artefact (such as a legal information leaflet which could be used by the public or in house) and/or deliver the findings to others (for example by the preparation and delivery of a lesson in a school or in house). You will construct your own learning goals and research objectives albeit with the needs of your audience (the members of the public benefiting from your work) in mind.

Skills employed will include research, written and oral communication including your ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner appropriate for your audience and team/group work. You will develop skills in reflective learning preparing you for the Student Law Office at level 6.

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LW5009 -

Inquests (Optional,20 Credits)

On this module you will have the opportunity to learn about the role of the coroner in England and Wales and the law relating to inquests. You will be able to study and examine the historical origins of the inquest as well as consider the present law. The lectures will provide a broad framework, however, within this framework the module is experiential in that you will be required to identify topics for additional and further in depth study and will be supported in researching, evaluating and analysing your findings.

The module is divided into 4 areas of enquiry:

• Historical perspectives- where you will have an opportunity to look at a particular period of the historical development of the coroner’s court/inquests. The module concentrates on the medieval period and the Victorian era but you are encouraged to explore an historical period that interests you.
• Notable inquests- you will investigate a notable inquest in depth (examples could include the death of Mark Duggan, the Hillsborough Inquest, The Marchioness Disaster or the death of Stephen Lawrence)
• Reform- you will consider and discuss the recent reform to the inquest system and in particular the Coroners and Justice Act 2009
• Practice and procedure- you will learn about the process of appearing at an inquest and will have an opportunity to take part in a simulated inquest to put your research into practice.

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LW5010 -

Trials of Dissenters (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will encourage you to place the ‘trial of dissent’ into a historical, political, social, economic, and cultural context. You will examine how the notions of orthodoxy and dissent have been characterised over time, through the study of several famous trials. By analysing selected trials and placing them within their historical and social contexts you will see how the law can be used to further political or social ends, and how prosecutors and defendants have used the resources and forensic skills available to them to support and resist the imposition of orthodox views.

You will look at the trials of dissenters in relation to several themes – religious; political; gender; literary; and scientific dissent. You will study a minimum of two trials for each theme. For example, for the concept of trial for dissent from religious orthodoxy you can study the trial of Socrates in Athens in 399 B.C.E, and twentieth-century blasphemy trials. On political offences, the trials of Thomas Paine in England in the late eighteenth-century, and the trials of the Suffragettes in the twentieth century are possible subjects. Scientific dissent can involve an analysis of the trials of Galileo Galilei and John Scopes. The concept of gender dissent is explored through a study of those considered to have contravened gender/sexual orientation norms; this might include, for example, the trials of Anne Boleyn and Oscar Wilde. Literary dissent may include the trial of Radclyffe Hall, or proceedings relating to publication of D.H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover for example.

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LW5011 -

Jurisprudence (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about a range of legal and related theories. These areas will involve a range of activities including: reading and understanding key theoretical works, engaging with surrounding academic articles and considering the strengths and weaknesses of these theories.

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LW5012 -

Law and Literature (Optional,20 Credits)

Through discussion of a variety of carefully chosen texts you will find new ways to think about law and the institutions of law. You will learn about the varieties of ways in which the relationship between law and literature has been explored by legal academics (law as literature and in literature). Applying these ideas, you will be encouraged at all stages to reflect on your own relationship with the legal system, its function within our society and the values and attributes of the profession.

Topics will include:

• Introduction and orientation. What is law and literature?
• Trials and abuses
• Custom, conflict and dispute resolution
• Play readings
• Justice as ordeal: trials, witches and spies
• Utopias, Dystopias and Terrorism
• Legal ethics: what is a ‘good lawyer’?
• Legal theory in literature lecture – The Name of the Rose
• Kafka: The Trial

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LW5013 -

Gender, Sexuality, and Law (Optional,20 Credits)

The module seeks to explore contemporary theories of sexuality and to undertake a selective investigation of the ways in which sexuality has been posed and addressed as a problem in law through socio-legal analysis. You will explore contemporary debates relating to sexuality and gender drawing on theory, but placing them in a ‘real world’ context, enabling you to understand how the law seeks to respond to these issues, and how it might respond in the future.

Each year members of staff will choose the most topical areas to be studied on the syllabus. Some topics will be changed to reflect the current issues of the day. Subjects that might be explored in a year include a selection from: feminist and queer theory, reproductive rights, same-sex marriage/relationship status rights, trans rights, sex work/prostitution, non-normative sexual behaviours (e.g. public sex), pornography, queer space and legal geographies, bareback sex and HIV transmission, employment rights, adoption rights and paedophilia/inter-generational sex.

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LW5014 -

Animal Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the law and ethics relating to animals. Within the field of animal welfare, law and ethics are intertwined. It is only by examining our ethical duties towards animals that we can assess whether the existing animal protection laws are sufficient and if not, what law reform is needed. You will examine a number of case studies, for example, the use of animals in agriculture, to illustrate the link between law and ethics. A selection of ethical theories e.g. Singer’s utilitarian theory and Regan’s rights theory, will be critically analysed and applied to the case studies. This will allow for a critical examination of the relevant law to assess whether it is adequate to protect animals. There will be scope for some comparative analysis of animal protection law in other countries. You will also examine the arguments for and against granting legal personhood to some animals. All domestic and captive animals are legal things but there have been a growing number of international cases in recent years challenging their legal status, for example, the case of the chimpanzee, Tommy, in the USA. This debate raises the question of the nature of legal rights and the basis on which we grant them to others.

The module develops your professional skills and abilities in being able to effectively organise and communicate information orally and in writing to both specialist and non-specialist audiences. You will have the opportunity to give oral presentations in seminars to non-specialist audiences (your peers) and your written communication skills will be developed in the summative assessment where you will be writing to a specialist audience.

The module develops your personal value attributes of ethics and global awareness as well as intellectual independence and independent thinking. You will be encouraged to ask and answer questions about the law and ethics relating to animals and to challenge the way you think about our use and treatment of animals. The module develops curiosity and challenges you to think critically about our everyday use of animals.

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LW5112 -

Northumbria Law School Study Abroad Semester (Optional,60 Credits)

The Northumbria Law School Study Abroad Semester module is a 60 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad semester which is taken in Semester 2 of Year 2. You will undertake a period of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the study abroad is recognised in your transcript as a 60 credit Study Abroad Module The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

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MO9522 -

The Marketing and Logistics Interface (Optional,20 Credits)

The module aims to provide you with the knowledge and skills of applying a variety of Marketing and Logistics knowledge at the subject interface to support business decision making in this area. The module is delivered to you using weekly lectures and seminars, principally concentrating on the development of your subject skills and interpretation of the subject area. Within this module, you will cover ten main topics:

• The Global Customer;
• Overcoming Marketing/ Logistic interface barriers;
• The era of Network Competition; Logistics / Marketing Customer Value;
• Synchronous Supply;
• Managing Risk at the Marketing/Logistics Interface;
• Evaluating Market Channels;
• Channel Design;
• Logistics in the world of e-business;
• Digital Marketing and Logistics

The module will lead you to the development of subject specific skills and confidence in handling the knowledge gained. In doing so, it will expose you to a wide range of subject techniques in the Marketing and Logistics subject area. You will become aware of the role of the subject in the business context. Furthermore, you will gain an understanding of the role of the Marketing and Logistics functions and the development of various business problem solving models related to these areas.

On completing the module you will be able to select and apply the appropriate techniques to support business problem solving in a variety of situations. You will have developed relevant skills to support the theoretical material introduced throughout the module. You will create and design appropriate models as well as the use of appropriate theory.

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NX9524 -

Digital Business (Optional,20 Credits)

Throughout this module you will be introduced to the opportunities and challenges posed by doing business in an increasingly digital domain. This module is designed to give you an understanding of how using online channels impacts upon different parts of the organisation, and will in particular focus upon 3 core areas of business:
Digital Business Strategy: You will develop an understanding of the cost structures associated with using digital channels, different business models (including omni and multiple channel business strategies), distance issues around serving global markets and implications in terms of taxation and service delivery.
Marketing: In this part of the module you will consider changing consumer media consumption and behaviour; social media and m-commerce; customer relationship building in an online context, digital brand communities and performance metrics.
Supply Chain Management and Information Systems: You will also develop and appreciation of the role of supply chains in serving global markets, addressing issues such as the application of various systems to facilitate digital transactions (e.g. ERP, CRM) and issues related to web performance (e.g. web design and google analytics).

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LW5111 -

Northumbria Law School Study Abroad Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Northumbria Law School Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study between levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

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LW5113 -

Northumbria Law School Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Northumbria Law School Work Placement Year module is a full year 120 credit module available on degree courses which include a work placement year which is taken as an additional year of study between levels 5 and 6 (the length of the placement will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks and no more than 52 weeks). You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the training agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

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LW5003 -

Tort Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop a critical understanding of Tort Law in England and Wales. Tort Law concerns the circumstances in which a person may be liable to provide a remedy to another for the consequences of a civil wrong (other than a breach of contract). You will learn about why and how the law has evolved to create obligations in Tort Law, the shape and extent of those responsibilities and the remedies available for failure to meet those obligations. Topics include:

? An introduction to the nature and function of Tort Law

? Trespass to the person – personal rights to freedom from intentional interference with bodily integrity

? Negligence:

o Duty of care – when a duty of care is owed to another, and the scope of that duty

o Breach of the duty of care – the standard of care expected, and determining when it is met

o Causation and remoteness – the principles determining the extent of responsibility for loss

o Defences – full and partial defences available

o Psychiatric harm – as a particular problematic area in negligence law

? Occupiers’ liability to persons on their premises (lawfully and otherwise)

? Vicarious liability – when a person may be responsible in Tort law for the actions of another person

? Nuisance – the law of private nuisance

? Remedies

You will develop knowledge and critical understanding of Tort Law in these aspects, reading and applying cases, statutes and other material to answer problem questions and essay questions.

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LW6000 -

Equity and Trusts (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the substantive law of Equity and Trusts. It begins with an historical overview of the development of equity. This is followed by study of the creation of trusts (both express and implied). The next topic is Charitable trusts, an area which lends itself well to critical analysis. Next is a non-charitable purpose trust where students study the situations in which these trusts can be valid. You will then study the powers and duties of trustees, breach of trust and the remedies for this including tracing and equitable remedies. A critical approach is fostered throughout.

The creation of express trusts (including capacity, formalities, certainty and constitution)
Resulting and constructive trusts
Charitable trusts
Non-charitable purpose trusts
Trustees’ powers and duties
Breach of trust
Fiduciary relationships and fiduciary obligations
Tracing and Equitable remedies

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LW6001 -

Student Law Office (Core,60 Credits)

This module is based on experiential learning, or ‘learning through doing’. In this module, through real and simulated experiences with clients, you will develop a range of key lawyering skills, as well as effective workplace skills and enhancing your own interpersonal skills.
You will also work with your supervisor to develop the ability to reflect on your learning. This reflection is at the heart of the clinical experience, enabling you to understand your own learning process, and to fit your individual experiences into a wider context of personal and professional ethics and practice, and the social and economic contexts of law.

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LW6007 -

Intellectual Property Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about a range of laws protecting and regulating IP, including copyright, trade marks, passing off, patents, design rights & breach of confidence. These areas will involve a range of activities including: reading and applying cases, legal interpretation, addressing essay questions and problem questions.

Upon completion of his module you will be able to show the following (level 6 learning outcomes):
1) A systematic & in-depth knowledge of key aspects of IP law, demonstrating detailed and coherent understanding
2) An ability to recognise and apply some of the current theories and critical scholarship at the forefront of IP law
3) An ability to consolidate & apply your knowledge of IP law to complex legal problems in order to find solutions
4) An ability to conduct self-directed research including accurate indentification of issues, the retrieval and evaluation of relevant, current information from a range of sources
5) An ability to show curiosity and awareness of the cultural & political impacts of IP laws by exercising your own intiative and ethical judgment

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LW6008 -

Sale of Goods and Consumer Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the law relating to the supply of goods and services in both non-consumer and consumer contexts. You will also learn about consumer law and how criminal and civil laws protect consumers’ rights. You will develop the ability to understand, explain and apply the law in a practical context.
This module covers the following topics:
• the sale and supply of goods and services in both consumer and non-consumer contracts;
• how and when property passes in a sale of goods contract;
• online and distance selling;
• unfair contract terms;
• consumer safety and unfair trading practices – how criminal and civil law protects consumers and how businesses must comply with the law;
• consumer credit – types of agreement, formation and termination of agreements and creditors’ liability; and
• enforcement of consumer rights.

On this module you will be:
• researching, reading, analysing and discussing cases and statutes;
• considering and answering problem questions in both lectures and workshops;
• developing your oral communication skills in workshops; and
• developing your written communication skills when preparing for workshops and producing work for feedback.

You will gain a wide perspective on the areas covered by this module by developing an appreciation of the relationship between civil, criminal, administrative and self-regulatory controls.

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LW6010 -

Commercial Contracts (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about the key issues and consequences relevant to conducting business successfully in the modern world. You will learn how commercial contracts can be used as a risk management tool, how to exercise professional judgement and you will become more commercially aware. You will also learn about how businesses use marketing arrangements to increase sales and how competition law impacts on these arrangements. As you examine commercial contracts in realistic practical contexts you will learn about drafting issues and consequences in standard form contracts, how to allocate risk and you will develop an awareness of current issues and developments in the commercial environment.

Topics include:
• commercial sales of goods contracts;
• passing of property and allocation of risk in commercial contracts;
• express terms, implied terms and exclusion clauses;
• performance of the contract;
• consequences of breach of contract,
• agency and the Commercial Agents (Council Directive) Regulations 1993
• distribution agreements; and
• EU competition law – Article 101 of the Treaty of the Functioning of the European Union

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LW6011 -

Medical Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop a critical understanding of medical law in England and Wales. The module will examine the legal framework that governs medical treatment and will focus on statute and common law. In addition the module will consider key ethical issues raised by these matters, including the influence of professional guidance in this area.

This module covers the following topics:
1. Relationship between law and ethics; resolution of disputes other than by way of clinical negligence, for example contract and judicial review
2. Clinical Negligence
3. Medical Confidentiality.
4. Consent to medical treatment.
5. The Beginning of Life.
(a) contraception
(b) pre-natal negligence
6. Abortion
7. The End of Life.
(a) Neonaticide;
(b) Euthanasia and assisted suicide
(c) Treatment withdrawal

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LW6012 -

Family Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the range of laws, case law and practice developed in England and Wales to deal with matters arising from the breakdown of family relationships, including divorce, dissolution of a civil partnership, financial relief remedies, child maintenance, children, domestic abuse and cohabitees.
These areas will involve a range of activities including : reading, interpreting and applying statute and case law to practical scenarios, drafting court documents and developing writing skills in essay style questions.

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LW6014 -

Introduction to Comparative and International Criminal Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop critical understanding of substantive criminal law of the major legal systems of the world. You will learn different methods and techniques of comparative law and its significance to the development of domestic criminal law as well as to the work of the International Criminal Tribunals, namely, the International Criminal Court (ICC), the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. The module will take a critical look at the elements of crimes, individual criminal responsibility, and modes of participation from comparative and international criminal law perspectives.

This module covers the following topics:

• Introduction to Comparative Criminal Law;
• Comparative Analysis of Mens Rea Standards in Common Legal Systems, Romano/Germanic Legal Systems, Islamic Legal Traditions and International Criminal Law
• Comparative Analysis of Different Modes of Participation in Criminal Offences with Particular Focus on Joint Criminal Enterprise in Common Law Systems and Co-Perpetration & the Control Over the Crime Theory in German Criminal Law and their Application by International Criminal Courts and Tribunals
• Elements of International Crimes, i.e. Genocide and Crimes against Humanity
• General Principles of Law in the Jurisprudence of the ICTY, ICTR and ICC: Examining the Relevant Case Law of these Tribunals and the Techniques adopted by International Judges in their Search of General Principles of Law Derived from National Legal Systems of the World

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LW6017 -

Employment Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop knowledge and understanding of the laws governing the relationship between a person, the employee, who works for another person, the employer. Working relationships come in many different guises, so drawing a precise boundary around the subject can be difficult but you will engage with some of the current theories and emerging themes surrounding the modern employment relationship. In this module you will learn about the following:-

The Scope of Employment Law (and what is Labour Law?)
• Why do we have employment law?
• Sources of law
• Current themes/ theories in employment law

The scope of labour law and the employment relationship
• The organising concepts used in English employment law
• Non-standard working relationships
• The contract of employment

Equality
• Core concepts
• Protected characteristics
• Application and enforcement

Pay
• Contractual remuneration
• National minimum wage
• Equal pay

Job security
• Termination of the employment relationship
• Unfair dismissal
• Wrongful dismissal
Business Re-organisations
• Redundancy
• Business transfers and changes of ownership

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LW6020 -

Company Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop an in depth knowledge and understanding of key aspects of company law in England and Wales. You will learn about the most important types of companies: private companies that are privately owned and public companies that can offer their shares to the general public and may be listed on a stock exchange. You will develop a critical awareness of current issues and an understanding of the perspectives and wider debates about the nature of company law.
This module covers the following topics:
• types and classification of companies;
• incorporation and the nature of corporate personality;
• the role of directors in managing a company and directors’ duties;
• financing: raising capital by issuing shares and the role and rights of shareholders;
• the corporate governance debate and public companies; and
• company insolvency.
In terms of skills development, you will read and apply company law cases, interpret statutory provisions and consider some of the relevant academic articles in this area.

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LW6022 -

International Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about international law - the law of nations. Beginning with an overview of the basics of international law - treaties and customary law, state responsibility, and jurisdiction - you will then progress through a series of case studies (on diplomatic immunities, the use of force, the law of armed conflict, international criminal law, international human rights law, and international economic law) to develop your knowledge of how those basic principles are applied. You will also develop an understanding of the international legal elements of current international events through these case studies.

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LW6025 -

Sports Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the theory, law and practice of sports law in England and Wales (including EU law and the World Anti-Doping Code). The module builds on knowledge gathered in the compulsory subjects of Contract, EU law, Criminal Law and Tort but also introduces students to other legal disciplines such as Employment Law. You will study the role of consent as a defence to what would otherwise be criminal liability for injuries incurred in the context of contact sports (such as football, ice hockey and rugby) and combat sports. You will study the causes and implications of the major 20th century sports stadium disasters including Valley Parade and Hillsborough. You will learn about the law applicable to football hooligans and consider the compatibility of some of these measures with the Human Rights Act. You will study the civil liability of (i) sports participants to each other and (ii) match officials, sports club owners, event organisers and governing bodies to sports participants, spectators and people living in close proximity to sports venues, which will engage your knowledge of negligence, nuisance and occupiers’ liability. You will examine the impact of EU Law on sport (in particular the right of free movement of workers in football and challenges to nationality quotas), the role of the Equality Act 2010 in tackling discrimination in sport, and the legal implications of doping in sport. Although the module has a UK focus it has a global scope and reference will be made to important developments overseas.

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LW6026 -

Legal History (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module, through the study of certain selected themes, you will develop a critical awareness of the role of law in society. You will be able to see in an historical context how social conditions are reflected in common law and legislation, and how law affects societal relations. The module explores the interplay between law and society, but includes detailed consideration of selected statutory material and cases.

Subject areas can include:

• Crime and the criminal law in the medieval period: crime and medieval society; public order; law enforcement; punishment; outlaws.
• Crime and the criminal law 1550 – 1700: the role of the criminal law in maintaining the norms of behaviour in a period of economic, social and political tension. Specific topics include witchcraft, homicide, judicial and community punishment.
• Treason: development of substantive law and evidential requirements. Trials considered concentrate on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, such as Sir Thomas More, Anthony Babington, Charles I or Lord Russell.
• Women and the law: women as victims and perpetrators of criminal offences; changing treatment of female criminality by the secular and the church courts; impact of marriage on women’s legal status.
• Development of the legal professions: origins of the various types of legal practice; Inns of Court; legal education.
• Development of the courts: functions of the courts; role of the justices; development of judicial costume.
• Constitutional development: 1066 to Magna Carta; during the Tudor period; the Stuarts and the struggle between the Crown, the Common Law and Parliament.

More information

LW6028 -

International Family Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will gain an analytical and practical insight into the rationale and jurisprudence of family law as it affects families and individuals across Europe and the rest of the world. Specifically, the module will examine how the law regulates family law issues with an international dimension, how the law in England and Wales compares with the law in other jurisdictions and how international laws and treaties relating to family law are implemented, interpreted and enforced.

The issues that will be explored include:

• Choice of law and jurisdiction
• International child abduction
• Recognition and enforcement of Judgments in other jurisdictions
• Female Genital Mutilation
• Forced Marriage
• Marriage validity and religious marriage contracts

By participating in this module, you will also be encouraged to prepare blog articles for the module tutors’ blog in this area, A Family Affair, which can be accessed at: https://afamilyaffairsite.wordpress.com. You will also be encouraged to attend regular documentary screenings around wider international family law issues and participate in discussion around these issues. The screenings will examine topics such as honour based violence, traditional harmful practices, and culturally specific forms of domestic violence. Participation in these non-compulsory activities will allow you to develop your professional skills and participate in wider debates about the issues raised in the module.

No prior knowledge of family law or international law will be required. This module complements other subjects offered at this stage in your programme, including family law, child care and international human rights law.

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LW6036 -

The Law of Outer Space (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with a detailed understanding of the way in which space exploration is governed on a national and international level. The module will examine the governance of traditional space activity: the development of satellite communications, military activity in space, the use of interplanetary probes to gain scientific data and also human spaceflight. You will also evaluate legal responses to the challenges posed by new developments such as space tourism, space mining and the increased environmental strain on the space environment.

The issues that will be explored include:

• Introducing International Space Law; The Outer Space Treaty & follow up treaties
• Astropolitics, International Relations and Policy in Space
• The Institutions of Space Administration
• Environmental Space Law
• The Moon and Other Celestial Bodies
• Planetary Protection
• Astronauts and Space Travellers and Tourism
• Space Mining
• National Space Legislation
• Military Space Activity
You will be encouraged to immerse yourself in the space environment and formative assessment will be by means of preparing blog posts for the module tutor’s blog The Legal Spaceman. There are also external blogs which encourage student submissions. There will be guest lectures by experts in the field of space exploration. Study on this module is predicated on an interest in wider issues surrounding space exploration.

No prior knowledge of space law will be required. An awareness of international law will be useful but is not essential. This module complements other subjects offered at this stage in your programme, and will also provide you with policy and international relations perspectives.

More information

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

Law LLB (Hons)

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