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MA Fashion Design (Sustainable and Ethical Fashion)

In an increasingly eco-conscious and fast-changing world, where resources need to be managed effectively and responsibly, the fashion industry needs leaders who are passionate and committed to these ideals.

This pathway offers students the opportunity to contribute to responsible design systems and practice within the industry. It aims to provide future leaders with an in-depth understanding of the economic, environmental, and social factors behind the adoption of circular economy principles, fair trade and human and animal welfare. The programme responds to significant industry, consumer and political demand for graduates who can effectively apply professional knowledge and communication skills to responsible design practice, helping to create fashion products with sustainable, social and commercial value.

MA Fashion Design (Sustainable and Ethical Fashion) is suited to those who wish to further their professional practice with social, critical, technological and ecological dimensions within a self-directed project.


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