VA7037 - Co-Production

What will I learn on this module?

This module explores fine art practice as a form of co-production: of making and thinking with or alongside others. The traditional view of Fine Art production as individualistic has been variously problematised by ecological, social, performance and materialist perspectives which show it instead as a production with/alongside others: including human and non-human bodies and objects. How might collaborators, participants, audience members, materials, technology, urban sites and the natural environment complicate, resist, even reshape the artist’s intention? The module also asks: What are the negotiations that artists need undertake with others? What are the ethical responsibilities of artistic production?



The module introduces discourses around co-production timely to the contemporary artworld and guides you toward an interim exhibition. Through working with your peers to realise a group exhibition, you will evaluate and reflect upon how your artworks and materials-led enquiries engage others: collaborators, peers, institutions, and audiences. The option-based framework of the academic and technical teaching will inform and assist you in testing out ideas through material experimentation and individually focused discussion. The BALTIC Research Exchange will provide on-going opportunity for developing understandings of multidisciplinary research methodologies through dialogic exchange.



The module also includes an introduction to career planning, starting the process of developing enterprise skills to enable you to ethically and sustainably launch and build a career as a self-supporting practitioner. You will acquire some of the enterprise skills that will help you position and promote yourself to others in a professional environment, and you will be supported to develop a draft career plan that underpins and focuses the exploration of your practice.

How will I learn on this module?

You build your pathway through the specialist research-led teaching offered. You work with peers to build a safe, collaborative and outward-facing shared learning environment.



Self-Directed Research and Practice enable you to foreground and critically reflect upon your chosen artistic working methods. You are encouraged to understand your work relationally, discussing its motivations and inspirations in relation to theoretical and historical trajectories, with a view to generating informed meanings within a range of contexts.



Seminars are run as a series, in small groups, on themes and discourses initially established through research specialisms of the academics, then gradually responding and incorporating student-led research concerns and thematics. They allow you to develop new research knowledge and apply what you learn directly into your practice, as well as developing enterprise skills to support a future career.



Development workshops focus on applied learning in areas such as creative writing, performance methods, facilitation skills, exhibition production etc through instruction and rehearsal.



Group Crits enable you to present resolved or in-progress work. Sessions foreground peer discussion, negotiation and critical reflection. Collective and cross-cohort learning supports establishing strong peer links and orientating your practical work towards public exhibitions and presentation.



Individual Tutorials with academics provide ongoing focused feedback on your work and practice.



Technical Instruction offers specialisms: photography, print, construction, casting and fabrication, video, sound and digital imaging.



Baltic Research Exchange enables you to work on an on-going research-exchange project with curators and the educational team from Baltic.



External Visits connect you with networks, sites and venues through a combination of field work and engagement with external expertise and resources such as archives, innovate projects and cultural events.

How will I be supported academically on this module?

You are supported through ongoing formative academic feedback of work in progress. Primarily this is through your studio tutor who provides you with regular assessment of your progress through tutorials, and supports you in working towards both the module aims, assessment briefs, and your own personal goals. Written feedback at the end of the module supports your academic advancement by assisting your reflection on and awareness of your achievements and potential as a learner. Pastoral support is available through your guidance tutor who can assist you and help you to access all relevant sources of academic and non-academic support through the University’s Student Central. MFA academics work closely with the University disability advisers to ensure those students with dyslexia and other learning difficulties are fully supported. Additional bookable and drop in study skills support is available through the Northumbria SkillsPlus Programme at the City Campus Library and via MyNorthumbria. In line with the University’s equal opportunities statement, all students that are confirmed with a disability are given every support to enable them to meet their full potential on the course. Meetings with the Module and Programme Leads offer the opportunity to discuss course and related matters. All MFA academics can be contacted via email and have regular in-person consultation and feedback office hours.

The Enterprise team provide access to the hatchery for incubating a new way of launching your career as a professional artist, with advice and physical support available to Northumbria graduates.

What will I be expected to read on this module?

All modules at Northumbria include a range of reading materials that students are expected to engage with. The reading list for this module can be found at: http://readinglists.northumbria.ac.uk
(Reading List service online guide for academic staff this containing contact details for the Reading List team – http://library.northumbria.ac.uk/readinglists)

What will I be expected to achieve?

Knowledge & Understanding:

1. To produce a range of practical outputs / artworks that negotiate and work within interdisciplinary fields of contemporary arts practice.



2. To contextualise detailed developments in practice through appropriate and informed contemporary art and cultural research models.





Intellectual / Professional skills & abilities:

3. To evidence a proficient range of developed technical, intellectual and research strategies that support a sustainable situated practice, through intensive research-focussed experimentation, negotiation of contexts, lateral thinking and multi-tasking.



4. To evidence appropriate and tested pathways to audience dissemination and presentation through practice.



5. To demonstrate effective focusing of creative ideas and research exploration through detailed critical evaluation of sources in relation to an independent and outward-facing practice.



6. To evidence development of logistical skills in relation to presenting, through oral communication, engaging creative forms, contextual researching, and time management.



7. To demonstrate the ability to think laterally, multi-task and collaborate.



8. To evidence enterprise skills in researching, exploring and evaluating options for professional career development, and routes to build identity and viability in an artistic marketplace or workforce.





Personal Values Attributes (Global / Cultural awareness, Ethics, Curiosity) (PVA):





9. To evidence the highest standards of ethical and safe studio practice.

How will I be assessed?

You will be assessed summatively at the end of the module via three components:
1) (60%) presentation of a body of selected / resolved artwork(s) that demonstrates ability to develop creative ideas through the use of appropriate skills and technologies. Tutors will evaluate your achievements in relation to the module learning outcomes (1, 2 , 3, 8) in relation to: the rigour / energy with which you have pursued your investigations; your ability to resolve ideas, conceptually and practically; the way in which you have managed time and resources and the innovative, challenging or engaging character of the work produced.

2) (15%) a written summary of 1000 words contextualising the formal and thematic developments that have occurred in the practice during the semester. Tutors will evaluate your achievements in relation to module learning outcome 4, with reference to your incorporation of a suitable set of references for contextualising your own explorations, drawing on the work of other artists and relevant critical texts.

3) (15%) An oral presentation synthesizing key themes from the artworks and written critical summary. It will meet Module Learning outcomes (5, 6)



4) (10%) An enterprise plan setting out your career goals and planned activity to reach them. It will meet Module Learning outcomes (6, 7)



Summative assessment:

Submission of artworks and practice (60%)

Written Text, 2000 words (15%)

Oral Presentation, 10 minutes (15%)



Career plan (10%)



Formative feedback:

Is given on all elements of assessment including an outline draft of your career plan.

Pre-requisite(s)

None

Co-requisite(s)

TBC

Module abstract

This module explores fine art practice as a form of co-production, it involves recognising the vibrant possibilities of making and thinking with or alongside others. Taking cues from ecological, social, performance and materialist perspectives the module explores how collaborators, audience members, materials, technology, urban sites and the natural environment complicate, resist, even reshape the artist’s intention. What are the negotiations that artists need undertake with others? What are the ethical responsibilities of artistic production?



The module introduces discourses around co-production timely to the contemporary artworld and guides you toward an interim exhibition. Through working with your peers to realise a group exhibition, you will evaluate and reflect upon how your artworks and materials-led enquiries engage others. Through exchanges with BALTIC curators, and the progressing framework of academic and technical teaching, you will be supported in developing multidisciplinary research methodologies, and in testing them out through material experimentation and dialogic exchange.

Course info

Credits 60

Level of Study Postgraduate

Mode of Study 2 years full-time

Department Arts

Location City Campus, Northumbria University

City Newcastle

Start September 2021

Fee Information

Module Information

All information on this course page is accurate at the time of viewing.

Courses starting in 2021 are offered as a mix of online and face to face teaching due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to flex accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

Students will be required to attend campus as far as restrictions allow. Contact time will increase as restrictions ease, or decrease, potentially to a full online offer, should restrictions increase.

Our online activity will be delivered through Blackboard Ultra, enabling collaboration, connection and engagement with materials and people.

 

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