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This is an ideal course if you have an interest in current affairs, digital industries and enjoy researching and crafting stories.

The Northumbria Media and Journalism course offers a carefully considered mix of theory and practice to develop the skills you need to thrive in this fast moving industry. It will teach you the fundamentals of journalism practice and theory, including news writing, the law and ethics, media production skills, and producing, creating and writing for films.

Graduates of the course are ideally placed for a career in digital news media, the newspaper industry, radio, documentary film and television production.

This is an ideal course if you have an interest in current affairs, digital industries and enjoy researching and crafting stories.

The Northumbria Media and Journalism course offers a carefully considered mix of theory and practice to develop the skills you need to thrive in this fast moving industry. It will teach you the fundamentals of journalism practice and theory, including news writing, the law and ethics, media production skills, and producing, creating and writing for films.

Graduates of the course are ideally placed for a career in digital news media, the newspaper industry, radio, documentary film and television production.

Course Information

UCAS Code
PP35

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Social Sciences

Location
Lipman Building, Newcastle City Campus

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019

Department / Humanities

Our Department of Humanities includes the subject areas of History, English Literature, English Language and Linguistics, Creative Writing and American Studies.

Humanities Video Gallery

Discover more about what you will learn on the course, more about our academics research interests, and hear from current students by watching our videos.

Book an Open Day / Experience Media and Journalism BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Media and Journalism. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Working individually and within groups, you will hone your research, storytelling, presentation and production skills in order to create ethically sensitive, high quality journalism.

Assessment methods are designed to reflect the diverse nature of the programme, combining traditional essays and examinations with quizzes, portfolio work, and individual and group presentations. Assessment in the Film Production module, for example, includes elements which focus on working as a team to produce documentaries.

Our staff act as facilitators throughout, encouraging you to develop the intellectual and interpersonal skills needed to work effectively in the high pressure media world.

Book an Open Day / Experience Media and Journalism BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Media and Journalism. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

The teaching team combines expertise in academia and industry to ensure we produce graduates with the right balance of academic skills and practical knowledge needed to act professionally, responsibly and ethically in the workplace.

Practical modules are taught by an academic team who have worked for many years in the cut and thrust of the media industry, while theoretical modules are led by lecturers whose research gives a valuable insight and analysis of modern trends.

Among your tutors you will find media professionals from all walks of journalism alongside award-winning producers and directors. Academic support is central to the delivery of the Media and Journalism course, with primary support coming from the Module Tutor.

Book an Open Day / Experience Media and Journalism BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Media and Journalism. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Technology Enhanced Learning is embedded in the Media and Journalism programme, both in terms of using technologies for assessment and teaching digital technologies such as big data, infographics and data visualisations.

You will be trained extensively on equipment which not only replicates industry but has, as far as possible, been future-proofed. Contemporary modules such as Hyperlocal Journalism, and Journalism and Design, take full advantage of web authoring and social media to develop your skill sets. Traditional, academic modules are greatly enhanced by the use of the British Universities Film and Video Council’s Box of Broadcasts website.

Throughout this hands-on course you will undertake a number of film productions, culminating in your third year where you will draw on all of you skills to complete a major project, in preparation to enter the industry.

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Experience Media and Journalism BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Media and Journalism. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Developing research competence is a crucial element of the course, not least because research lies at the heart of journalism and of most media professions. The Media and Journalism BA is carefully structured to enable increasing levels of independence and autonomous learning.

We prepare you for a career in journalism and related professions, using a variety of learning and teaching approaches which foster the development of critical curiosity and independent action. The course is designed to promote research-rich learning in a challenging and supportive learning environment.

The academic team are actively involved in research across a range of areas including: gender and equality in the media, citizen journalism, activism through journalism, conflict reporting, data journalism and the use of infographics.

70% of Northumbria’s research in Communication, Cultural and Media Studies is rated as being either world leading or internationally excellent.

Book an Open Day / Experience Media and Journalism BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Media and Journalism. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Employability, enterprise and entrepreneurship combine to form a strong thread throughout the Media and Journalism degree. All modules promote elements vital in the modern working environment such as intellectual curiosity, communication skills, cultural awareness and moral and ethical values.

Our established links with the local media and cultural sector results in frequent visits and guest lectures by industry professionals. This enables you to build networks, and get a feel for the reality of modern journalism.

You will research, apply for and complete a minimum of 20 days’ work experience in the Professional Placement module. Many of our students have made such a positive impression on their employer during the placement that they have been offered a full-time post upon graduation.

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

The Hub / The Student View

Book an Open Day / Experience Media and Journalism BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Media and Journalism. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

The course will prepare you for a wide range of communication and media roles including: journalism, film production, distribution and exhibition, television production, arts administration and management, museum work, public relations, creative writing, advertising, magazine writing, press offices, events management, media administration, media research, publicity and promotion.

You will also develop sought after transferrable skills including independent thinking, well developed interpersonal skills, digital IT skills and the ability to work as part of a team.

Some of our recent graduates are now working for organisations such as Take That Ltd, Metro Radio and The New Musical Express, to name a few.

Course in brief

Your course in brief

Year 1

Year one You will learn basic theoretical concepts as well as the skills of modern journalism: how to write stories across a range of media, produce short films, and work in a modern radio studio. You’ll gain an appreciation of how design plays an important role.

Year 2

Year two You will be tutored in skills aimed at longer form journalism, such as documentary filmmaking and magazine feature writing. You’ll cover additional topics including media law, public relations and other specialist areas.

Year 3

Year three This year focuses on preparing you for work via placements and employability training, a choice between a media project and a dissertation, and a variety of media-related specialist option modules, including celebrity media, fashion journalism and sports journalism.

Who would this Course suit?

This course is ideal for budding journalists looking for an employability-focused route into digital, broadcast and print media. It also opens the door to specialist reporting career paths, including film, fashion, celebrity, sport, or business.

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

 

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels 

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit 

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher 

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 credits at Distinction and 27 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually fro

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications</

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

FUNDING INFORMATION

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for UK/EU undergraduate tuition fee information**.

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information.

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying.

Click here for information on fee liability.

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Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

MP4001 -

Media Practice (Core, 20 Credits)

Media Practice’ introduces you to core practical skills and issues in contemporary media production. As part of production teams, you will learn basic skills and guidance to write, research, plan, shoot, and edit a short (3-4 minute) documentary style film focussing on a person of your choice using industry-standard equipment. The film will tell an interesting and individual story about your subject, using narrative and character to engage the viewer. You will also complete a Production Health and Safety course and develop skills in pitching ideas to reflect industry requirements. Alongside your Group Production work, you will continue to develop an Individual Portfolio, based on your original Research, Proposal and Treatment documents.

More information

MP4002 -

Practices of Journalism (Core, 20 Credits)

This module examines the historical evolution of journalism, examines its contemporary structures and cultures, and identifies the main issues confronting its future development. It integrates academic and journalistic perspectives to provide a wide-ranging introduction to the critical study of those policies and practices which determine journalistic production and consumption; and it equips those students contemplating a career in journalism with a comprehensive knowledge of its salient characteristics. The second half of the module looks at the role of the media and journalists in the democratic process. It looks at politics, elections and public administration at local, regional, national and European levels. You will learn how to cover political events and have an understanding of concepts of bias, objectivity, fairness and balance in political reporting. It will also look at rules of election reporting. You are also given a basic grounding in media law and the legal structures and environments in which journalists operate as well as newspaper and broadcast regulation.

More information

MP4003 -

Writing for Publication (Core, 20 Credits)

The purpose of the module Writing for Publication is to learn the basics of how to identify stories, source information, interview and write journalism for a range of publications including newspapers and online. As such you will learn to become an independent journalist, developing a sense of what is news and the best means to tell a story across a variety of media.

More information

MP4004 -

Broadcast Journalism Practice (Core, 20 Credits)

This module gives you an introduction to radio journalism by exploring, understanding and putting into practice the range of skills needed to operate as a Broadcast Journalist. Essential skills for any journalist are the ability to locate stories, to source and research them and to present them. This module concentrates on providing the technical and editorial skills/strategies which will permit graduate journalists to operate effectively in a professional radio newsroom. It introduces you to the basic techniques of interviewing and newsgathering, whilst emphasising the twin goals of speed and accuracy. You will be expected to exercise the appropriate degree of planning, initiative and autonomy in their professional practice. Voice and presentation training will be given in small groups as well as on an individual basis.

More information

MP4005 -

Key Concepts and Debates in Journalism (Core, 20 Credits)

Journalism: Key Concepts and Debates (JKC&D) addresses the foundations in the study of journalism. The module’s purpose is to prepare you to understand journalism beyond its explicit meaning. In other words, JKC&D offers the elements for an understanding of journalism from an academic perspective, rather than the typical approach of intelligent but untrained observers who discuss journalism on the basis of opinions about news content in general. This will involve familiarizing yourself with the theories, concepts and critical analysis of authors who have researched the institutions who produce the news; the formers’ sources of financing; the policies that regulate them; the professional profiles and identities of journalists; the technologies used; the audiences and their role in the reception and, more recently, the co-production of news content; the philosophical, political, ethical and commercial values that shape the news industry, among others. Towards the end of the module you should feel competent enough to ask critical questions about the dynamics addressed in lectures, which will require you to read expert analysis of journalistic processes and sections of academic articles, and to present and discuss the material in seminars. One month before the end of the module, you will be prepared to design a suitable essay question for your final assignment, and to conduct the necessary research before writing it in accordance to the standards of academic writing. Importantly, JKC&D aims to expose you to theories and concepts developed in the twentieth century, and to understand their continuity and change in our digital age.

More information

MP4006 -

Journalism and Design (Core, 20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce you to the principles of design and animation so they combine good journalism with a good-looking product.
You will develop skills in research, interviewing and writing and apply them to produce a portfolio of work in appropriately designed formats. You will also learn about how to interrogate data to produce stories and/or infographics.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5020 -

Social Sciences Study Abroad (40 credit) (Optional, 40 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is a semester based 40 credit module which is available on degree courses which facilitate study abroad within the programme. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be constructed to meet the learning outcomes for the programme for the semester in question, dependent on suitable modules from the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). The module will be assessed by conversion of graded marks from the host University.

Learning outcomes on the year-long modules on which the student is unable to attend the home institution must be met at the host institution, and marks from the host are incorporated into the modules as part of the overall assessment.

More information

MI5001 -

Film Production 2 - Documentary (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn about narrative and storytelling in film and TV documentaries. This will include learning about the history, theory and practice of existing influential documentaries, developing your skills in identifying a strong factual storyline, and then learning how to pitch, plan, and produce a short documentary film. You will also learn how to reflect critically on your own film and those of others. The module includes sessions on: consideration of contemporary trends in factual production and commissioning, the relationship with the ‘real’, the key elements of narrative documentary, observational filming techniques, establishing the documentary idea and creating a successful proposal or pitch, building a relationship with your contributor and planning a successful shoot, shooting script development and scheduling, copyright, consent and legal issues, keeping your storylines on track, managing the logistics of production and logging, creative documentary – and the blurred line with fiction, critiquing a documentary and writing a reflective commentary, editing for story and truth, and tracking and recording your own insights and learning.

More information

MP5002 -

Media Law and Ethics (Core, 20 Credits)

‘Media Law and Ethics’ investigates law and ethical conduct for print, online and broadcast journalists in the UK. It explores the current structure of media law and the court system. It also considers the ethical expectations and obligations of journalism as well as the constraints they create for journalists. This module aims to equip you with a critical awareness of the legal and ethical restrictions which will have an impact on the way you work as a journalist. Using contemporary examples as well as well-known cases, you will learn about the processes of the criminal court system and how to report its proceedings within the law.

More information

MP5003 -

Practical Magazine Journalism (Core, 20 Credits)

‘Practical Magazine Journalism’ aims to give you the practical skills to operate as a magazine journalist within an understanding of the wider context of industry and society. Teaching will encourage independent learning and production of original work. You will learn to analyse and critique contemporary magazine styles in order to develop your writing across a variety of magazine-based work, including profiles, news items and longer features. At the end of this module you will be able to gather and write magazine stories.

More information

MP5004 -

Re-thinking Journalism (Core, 20 Credits)

‘Re-thinking Journalism’ looks at how online journalism incorporates political activism and pressure groups. It will help you learn advanced skills in team-playing, online writing and digitally-based methodologies in activism. By creating and updating blogs, you will learn practical story-telling skills and be able to write literature reviews grounded in conceptual frameworks. You will also develop skills in presentation. Assessment is via a portfolio of blog entries a group presentation and an essay.

More information

MP5005 -

Hyper-Local Journalism (Optional, 20 Credits)

‘Hyperlocal Journalism’ will prepare you to produce factual and insightful information and to disseminate it amongst audiences located in specific geographic areas, such as universities, neighbourhoods, and communities that share lifestyles and routines which converge around particular locations and/or areas of interest. Using our newsroom you will learn to develop skills in citizen journalism. You will produce a portfolio of two online multimedia news packages for assessment on this module, as well as develop a list of high-quality news contributors and reflect on their suitability for original news stories.

More information

MP5007 -

Everyday Media (Optional, 20 Credits)

‘Everyday Media’ uses the context of “the everyday” to critically interrogate the ways in which people adapt to and subsume media into their everyday lives in a naturalistic manner, and the ways in which those forms of media impact or shape daily life. You will consider case studies examining living spaces and everyday behaviour surrounding everyday media technologies (television, interactive TV genres, music consumption, computers, mobile technologies, social media, apps and search engines). You It will study the ways in which such media are central components of our daily lives. Lectures and seminars will cover a range of relevant contemporary topics: the nature of brands, brand culture, the fundamentals of the branding process and consider how advertising professionals and corporate agencies design and establish an effective brand identity for a product or service nationally or globally. You will also examine a range of case studies including Starbucks, luxury fashion brands and Apple.

More information

MP5008 -

Sport, Media and Society (Optional, 20 Credits)

‘Sport, Media and Society’ is designed so you learn to apply critical thought, sociological analysis and relevant theories to contemporary mediated-sport. The content will necessarily be dynamic and continually evolving to reflect the fluid nature of the relationship between contemporary sport and the media (particularly through the development of new and social media) as well as related theoretical and political debates. However, the module will be built around the following key themes which are likely to remain central to it
• The history of mass media, using sports media as an exemplary case study, with focus on related social and cultural institutions (eg advertising and government)
• Sports-media as an agent of socialisation and source of social and cultural power.
• The emergence of ‘new’ and ‘social’ media (including, but not limited to, Twitter, Periscope, gambling, gaming) and its impact on traditional forms of media as well as the construction of sports-media narratives, identity and other social relations.
• Underlying theoretical, ethical and political issues in the relationship between sport and the mass media, including, but not limited to, the representation of gender, sexuality, class and regional and national identities.

More information

MP5010 -

Public Relations (Optional, 20 Credits)

In ‘Public Relations’ you will be introduced to the study and practise of PR techniques. This will involve both the analysis of campaigns and the production of materials appropriate to the PR management of events, corporate identity management, lobbying and other associated activities. The module will also introduce you to an understanding of the conduct of public relations in the context of the media in particular and a due consideration will be give to the reconciliation of client and audience needs and how these might be balanced.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5017 -

Social Sciences Work Placement Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks. You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AD5018 -

Social Sciences Study Abroad Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

MI6004 -

Watching the Detectives: Contemporary European Crime Film and TV (Optional, 20 Credits)

‘Watching the Detectives’ will examine the role contemporary European crime film & TV as popular narrative. You will learn about the development of the visual crime genre in a European specific context, as a means of exploring questions of national and cultural identities and also in order to gain an understanding of contemporary societal concerns. You will develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the historical, social and political contexts of the origins and development of contemporary European crime film & TV, and will explore and analyse trends and variations across the genre in relation to their socio-political contexts. You will also analyse specific key authors of contemporary European crime fiction as national icons and/or transnational figures. Further, you will examine the commonalities and specificities of chosen key texts. Throughout the module, you will evaluate the many varied perspectives of European crime film & TV which you encounter, and establish your own view of and position within these debates, developing your ability to present your own viewpoint in written and spoken language.

More information

MI6010 -

Adaptations on Film and TV (Optional, 20 Credits)

In ‘Adaptations on Film and TV’ you will examine the practical and theoretical debates around the translation of a variety of texts into films and television programmes. A broad-range of case studies is covered, from adaptations of ‘high art’ such as Shakespeare and literary fiction, to the conversion of popular fiction, comic-books and supposedly ‘unfilmable’ sources. As well as considering issues of authorship and originality, you will consider the complex relationship between film, television and other media forms, from music and video-gaming to theme-park rides. Films and programmes under discussion are likely to include examples such as Adaptation, William Shakespeare’s Romeo + Juliet, Sherlock, Doom, The Walking Dead, Band of Brothers, Star Trek amongst others.

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MP6001 -

Professional Placement (Core, 20 Credits)

This module guides you in the identification and successful completion of a work experience placement within the broader media industry; you then write a reflective report on that experience detailing how you applied skills taught elsewhere on the course. The work placement or portfolio of visits totals a minimum of four weeks (20 days). The intention is that every student will gain experience of work placement in the journalism and/or media industry, learning not only a basic understanding of the production processes at placement organisations but, using skills taught on the course, learn to become part of the placement organisation team, thereby making a meaningful contribution wherever possible to the output. You also gain insight into employability by developing CVs, personal branding skills and job interview techniques via a series of lectures and seminars. The placement is a requirement of our accreditation body, The Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC) for the BA (Hons) Journalism award.

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MP6002 -

Business and Journalism (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module examines the historical evolution of business journalism within the context of the UK. While practical elements are present the module takes a theoretical slant, discussing the contributions of historic and contemporary UK and global economists with the aims of identifying the roots of business journalism. You will learn practical writing skills within the realm of business journalism and be able to analyse business stories within both the local and global contexts.

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MP6004 -

Reporting Risk and Conflict (Core, 20 Credits)

‘Reporting Risk and Conflict’ will equip you with knowledge and skills to critically reflect on, and analyse, how issues and events of risk and conflict are reported within contemporary national and global contexts. It will provide you with the opportunity to explore the reporting of war and conflict, genocide and political/civil unrest, political and economic risks and environmental disasters using case studies in global society. It will provide you with the knowledge and skills to analyse reporting of risk and conflict within the context of critical journalism theory and research. By the end of the module, you will have gained, at the appropriate level, knowledge and skills to engage in key debates involving the reporting, under-reporting or mis-reporting of risk and conflict societies; critically explore the factors that shape the reporting of risk and conflict; appreciate the role of the news media in the social construction, or in the management/prevention, of risk and conflict societies.

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MP6005 -

Practical Media Project (Optional, 40 Credits)

‘Practical Media Project’ will develop and hone practical skills that you have been taught on earlier modules and found an interest in throughout your first two years study. Through practice and support from your allocated supervisor you will not only build upon the skills that you have learnt so far, but will also develop transferable skills that are industry facing as well as transferrable to other career paths. The project involves engaging in project design, considering ethical issues, researching, organising one’s time, planning, synthesising ideas, analysing current media trends, expressing your ideas and findings in a scholarly fashion, and producing a final practical outcome in a medium of your choice that adheres to both academic and industry standards.

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MP6006 -

Media Dissertation (Optional, 40 Credits)

‘Media Dissertation’ involves the researching and writing of an 8,000-10,000 word media-related dissertation on a subject of your own choosing. You should attend a series of mandatory lecture/workshop sessions in which the fundamental requirements of preparing and researching a dissertation will be examined and explained. These sessions will be spread across semester 1 and semester 2. In Semester 1, you will develop your initial dissertation proposal up to the point where you are ready to start writing the dissertation itself. You will develop your information-retrieval skills, familiarise yourself with your chosen subject, find solutions to any problems arising out of your research design, consider the significance of any ethical constraints, formulate your principal research question, and determine the methodology you will use. You are required to complete a 2000 word dissertation plan as part of your progress (however, the module grade will be entirely assessed against your final 8000-10000 word dissertation). In Semester 2 you will develop and amend the ideas in your dissertation plan, carry out further research, prepare and write the final dissertation. Supervision will continue to be provided through regular meetings with your supervisor.

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MP6007 -

Celebrity Media (Optional, 20 Credits)

‘Celebrity Media’ explores the contemporary cultural phenomena variously dubbed ‘celebrity culture’. The module enables you to critically investigate and evaluate the key ways in which celebrity culture is located and expressed in the Western world and globally. You will therefore examine the links between celebrity and social factors such as: politics, economics, gender, religion, and crime. The module also places celebrity culture in relation to key cultural industries such as journalism, advertising, sport, and fashion. The module draws upon a range of academic literature that ranges from classic work to cutting edge books and journal material to ensure that students engage with appropriate ideas, concepts, and academic approaches. You will also apply classic sociologists such as Durkheim and Weber to the contemporary celebrity landscape.

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MP6009 -

Media and Morality (Optional, 20 Credits)

‘Media and Morality’ introduces you to a range of theoretical paradigms and arguments within moral philosophy. These ideas will be explored via contentious debates located in current affairs. Examples from news, media and popular culture will be drawn upon in order to a) illustrate the continuing relevance of moral concerns raised by classical thinkers such as Kant and Aristotle, and b) demonstrate the ubiquity of moral concerns in contemporary culture. The module aims to evince the ways in which moral theory can deepen our understanding of contentious issues that impact on our lives and rights as citizens. The module also aims to develop your ability to work with complex theoretical concepts and to present your views on such matters in the form of focused arguments (both during class discussion and the final written assessment).

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MP6012 -

Fashion Journalism (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the fundamental components of contemporary fashion journalism and fashion-related writing. The module is contextualised by academic understandings of the concept of fashion which is then narrowed to understand the fashion industry from a journalistic perspective. Building upon this foundational position, you will learn about specific writing approaches to fashion, from profiling designers and fashion houses, to covering trends, discussing specific fashion artefacts, catwalk and fashion events and PR. Fundamentally, you will learn about specific fashion writing styles and formats, such as magazine, broadcast, and social media and online digital platforms.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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