CR6004 - Crimes of the Powerful

APPLY NOW BOOK AN OPEN DAY Add to My Courses Register your interest / Course PDF

What will I learn on this module?

Crime just doesn’t happen on the streets. It takes place in homes, in offices, in natural habitats – places hidden from view and scrutiny. Often it is kept hidden because of powerful actors. You will examine a range of criminal and harmful behaviours, as well as deviant and anti-social activities under the organising theme ‘crimes of the powerful’. The module situates and understands crimes and victimisations within a framework where questions of structural relationships and personal power in society are key to why some crime is visible and some is not. You will be expected to challenge orthodox representations of crime and demonstrate an intellectual openness to new ideas, whilst adopting a critical and analytical approach to the control, regulation and prevention of invisible and hidden crimes and/or victimisations.

How will I learn on this module?

You will learn in two main environments – a combination of lectures and seminars. Tutor-led lectures will be used to convey core theoretical and substantive material. Seminars will be student-led as well as more workshop-like in structure with numerous research-tutored and based activities. The more interactive environment of the seminars will be used to discuss, debate, and reinforce knowledge and concepts and to explore examples, past and present, of crimes of the powerful as well as additional case study materials. Supporting resources will be indicated or made available via the eLearning Portal.

Under the guidance of the module tutors, you will be expected to identify an appropriate area for research and to engage in a focussed, detailed in-depth case study of crime and/or victimisation in the context of ‘the powerful’. You are encouraged to identify an appropriate subject area for research, to devise a manageable and well-focussed project, plan a schedule of work and to function successfully as an independent learner.

Whilst this module contributes to your subject specific knowledge of a research rich critical criminology, it enables you to develop a reflective, questioning and inquiring approach to the discipline whilst enhancing your intellectual and professional skills.

How will I be supported academically on this module?

This is a team taught module with three or four staff members available to support you via email, in seminars, and during scheduled office hours. There is also substantial support from library based resources and your fellow students during seminars and outside of class. With these combined forms of support you will develop your own research expertise and a critical edge to your understanding of criminology and victimology.

What will I be expected to read on this module?

All modules at Northumbria include a range of reading materials that students are expected to engage with. The reading list for this module can be found at: http://readinglists.northumbria.ac.uk
(Reading List service online guide for academic staff this containing contact details for the Reading List team – http://library.northumbria.ac.uk/readinglists)

What will I be expected to achieve?

Knowledge & Understanding:
1. To understand crimes and victimisations within a framework where structural relationships and ruling class crime in society is recognised.
2. To form a critical argument in relation to the nature of invisible or hidden crimes and victimisations in society.
3. To explain a range of criminal and harmful behaviours, as well as deviant and anti-social activities under the organising theme ‘crimes of the powerful’ drawing on different resources and case examples.


Intellectual / Professional skills & abilities:
1. To collaborate with others and to work as part of a team whilst gaining experience of case study methodology.


Personal Values Attributes (Global / Cultural awareness, Ethics, Curiosity) (PVA):
1. To demonstrate cultural and social awareness in regards to why certain geographic locations and certain groups in society remain outside of mainstream research.

How will I be assessed?

Formative:
The seminar programme will support the formative assessment for this module, allowing for guided support and discussion around all components of the portfolio and the final case study.

Summative:
There are two main components to the summative assessment for this module.
The summative portfolio has four parts: 1. Peer assessment and marking exercise. 2. Writing skills exercise. 3. Referencing exercise. 4. Group work exercise. The portfolio will be submitted after the group work exercise approximately in week 8. The portfolio mark will be calculated from the best three marks from the above tasks. The portfolio will address core writing skills in addition to MLO 1, 4 and 5.
The final assessment is a case study of your choosing around a crime of the powerful. The case study addresses all five MLOs.

Pre-requisite(s)

N/A

Co-requisite(s)

N/A

Module abstract

Please find details of this module in the other sections provided.

Course info

UCAS Code LL44

Credits 20

Level of Study Undergraduate

Mode of Study 3 years full-time

Department Social Sciences

Location City Campus, Northumbria University

City Newcastle

Start September 2019 or September 2020

Fee Information

Module Information

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.

Your Learning Experience find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions - northumbria.ac.uk/terms
Fees and Funding - northumbria.ac.uk/fees
Admissions Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy
Admissions Complaints Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/complaints