Skip navigation

Support Students through Hardship

Contact us button
Donate now button

Northumbria University’s Hardship Fund helps to relieve financial hardship that impacts on a student’s ability to study and participate in higher education.

The Fund supports students who are experiencing unexpected or unforeseen financial difficulties through the provision of funding towards the cost of accommodation, food, childcare and learning resources/digital equipment. The funding enables students to concentrate upon their studies, without the worry of being unable to afford their basic living costs.

Thanks to the generosity of our alumni and other supporters, we have been able to make a real difference to the lives of many students across the Northumbria University community.

How can you help? 

A donation of:

£20 will pay for basic provisions for a few days

£75 will help towards rent and utility bills for a week

£150 will buy food supplies for a month

£500 will purchase a laptop and WiFi subscription for a student

 

Recipient of ToughTimes funding Konark

International Student receives vital funding

An image of a Nurse

Children’s nurse receives much needed support

a person smiling for the camera

Hardship campaign supports Law student

A Telethon headset

Telethon supports Hardship Fund

Giving Tuesday imagery

Giving Tuesday appeal raises over £7000

Donate Now

Latest News and Features

Military uniform
Nursing Degree Apprenticeship shortlisted for national award
Simulated learning using virtual reality recognised as example of best practice in nursing education
Mothers working on the quilts at the community workshops hosted by the researchers.
Greenland Ice Sheet near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland
A three-year research project, led by academics from Northumbria University, aims to better connect the care system and expand it include creative health approaches such as art, crafts, sports, gardening or cooking to provide holistic support tailored to individuals. Getty Images.
Dark green fritiliary (Speyeria aglaja) is a species for which local extinctions have been linked to a warming climate. Photo by Alistair Auffret.
Bridget Phillipson stood with Vice-Chancellor Andy Long and Roberta Blackman-woods

Back to top