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Dr David Stewart

Associate Professor

Department: Humanities

David Stewart is Associate Professor of Romantic Literature. 

David joined Northumbria in 2009, having previously taught at the University of Glasgow. His first degree, in English and Philosophy, was from the University of Stirling. After this he studied for a Masters and a PhD at the University of Glasgow. He is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

His research focuses on the literature and culture of the Romantic period. He has published books on the literary magazines of the 1810s and 1820s, and the poetry of the 1820s and 1830s. Current work explores the Anglo-Scottish Borderlands. His work focuses on poetics, print culture, book history, landscape, and the environment.

David Stewart

Campus Address

Office: Lipman 416C



David Stewart is a specialist in Romantic-period literature and culture. He has published two books and over 20 articles and chapters on topics including periodicals, print culture, poetic form, periodisation, the city, landscape, and mobility.

His first monograph, Romantic Magazines and Metropolitan Literary Culture (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), explores the decade following the end of the Napoleonic Wars in which the literary magazine rose to prominence. It claims the magazine as a form unusually well-placed to explore and reflect creatively upon a literary culture that was expanding so rapidly writers and readers could not keep up. It considers a wide range of magazines and writers, most centrally the periodicals of Leigh Hunt, Blackwood's Magazine, the London Magazine, and the New Monthly Magazine.

His second book, The Form of Poetry in the 1820s and 1830s: A Period of Doubt (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018), explores the poetry of a period often depicted as a dead end between Romanticism and Victorianism. Drawing on new data about the publishing market, the book shows that poetry publication was in fact buoyant: it considers the work of a range of poets including Felicia Hemans, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Alfred Tennyson, Thomas Hood, and the literary annuals. Yet it was a 'period of doubt' because poets began to question the place of poetry in culture. The complex forms their poems took are worth prizing exactly in their doubtful self-questioning.

Other publications include considerations of the development of the short story, celebrity in the periodical press, literary London, Lord Byron at the Newcastle Literary & Philosophical Society, periodisation, accidental poetry, and Wordsworthian parody. His work continues its focus on the 1820s and 1830s, with a special interest in the work of Pierce Egan.

His current research focuses on the environment, landscape and fiction in the Anglo-Scottish borders. The project explores work by relatively well-known figures such as James Hogg, Allan Cunningham, and Walter Scott as well as writers less often read such as Amelia Beauclerc, John Mackay Wilson, and Elizabeth Strutt. It draws literary fiction into conversation with theories of place and mobility drawn from anthropology and geography.

  • Please visit the Pure Research Information Portal for further information
  • Introduction, Stewart, D., Gardner, J. 26 Jan 2024, Nineteenth-Century Literature in Transition, Cambridge University Press
  • Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Chronicler of the 1830s, Stewart, D. 26 Jan 2024, Nineteenth-Century Literature in Transition, Cambridge University Press
  • Landscape, Stewart, D. 1 Nov 2022, The Oxford Handbook of British Romantic Prose, Oxford, Oxford University Press
  • On a Spree with Pierce Egan's Life in London, Stewart, D. 1 Jul 2022
  • “A quivering quick-sand”: romantic Border aesthetics, Stewart, D. 29 Oct 2021, In: Studies in Scottish Literature
  • Poetry’s Variety: Clare and the Poetic Scene in the 1820s and 1830s, Stewart, D. 23 Oct 2020, Palgrave Advances in John Clare Studies, London, Palgrave Macmillan
  • Genuine Border Stories: James Hogg, Fiction, and Mobility in the 1830s, Stewart, D. 31 Dec 2018, In: Yearbook of English Studies
  • The Form of Poetry in the 1820s and 1830s: A Period of Doubt, Stewart, D. 2018
  • Wordsworth, Parody, Print and Posterity, 1814-1822, Stewart, D. 3 Sep 2018, In: European Romantic Review
  • The Magazine and Literary Culture, Stewart, D. Mar 2017, Journalism and the Periodical Press in Nineteenth-Century Britain, Cambridge University Press

  • Leighton Wright ‘Writers, Publishers, And Readers: Popular Romanticism In The Marketplace’ Start Date: 01/10/2015 End Date: 06/11/2019
  • Sarah Lill 'The Father of the Cheap Press': Edward Lloyd and the Mass-Market Periodical,1830-1855 Start Date: 04/10/2011 End Date: 21/05/2015
  • Eloise Scott Space, Solitude and the Sublime: Urban Romantic Writers and the Architecture of the Mind. Start Date: 18/01/2021
  • Julia Ditter Thinking Through Scotland: Literary Form, Borders and the Environmental Imagination Start Date: 01/10/2019 End Date: 25/01/2023
  • Lyndsey Skinner Literary Print Culture and the Romantic Canon Start Date: 08/10/2013

  • English Literature PhD September 01 2005
  • Fellow (FHEA) Higher Education Academy (HEA) 2009


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