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Are you ready to immerse yourself in a dynamic and exciting environment, to learn about the ways media influences our daily lives and the world around us?

The BA (Hons) Mass Communication with Public Relations pathway course is an innovative media-based degree that allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the concepts, theories, practices and methods that characterise contemporary media, communication, and cultural studies.

From day one, you will be supported in developing an independent critical understanding of the key developments within mass communications, a field of study that encompasses a wide variety of media organisations, technological innovations, cultural industries, and audiences.

You will develop your knowledge, skills and abilities on a course that will enable you to critically evaluate contemporary mass communications industries and to understand the technological, social and political factors that shape those industries.

Northumbria was ranked top 25 in the Guardian University Guide 2017 for Journalism, Publishing and Public Relations 

This programme is delivered entirely at Kaplan in Singapore and is offered as Part Time and Full Time mode of study.

If you would like to apply or for further information please visit the Kaplan website. For any specific queries relating directly to Northumbria please contact tne@northumbria.ac.uk.

Are you ready to immerse yourself in a dynamic and exciting environment, to learn about the ways media influences our daily lives and the world around us?

The BA (Hons) Mass Communication with Public Relations pathway course is an innovative media-based degree that allows you to develop specialist knowledge of the concepts, theories, practices and methods that characterise contemporary media, communication, and cultural studies.

From day one, you will be supported in developing an independent critical understanding of the key developments within mass communications, a field of study that encompasses a wide variety of media organisations, technological innovations, cultural industries, and audiences.

You will develop your knowledge, skills and abilities on a course that will enable you to critically evaluate contemporary mass communications industries and to understand the technological, social and political factors that shape those industries.

Northumbria was ranked top 25 in the Guardian University Guide 2017 for Journalism, Publishing and Public Relations 

This programme is delivered entirely at Kaplan in Singapore and is offered as Part Time and Full Time mode of study.

If you would like to apply or for further information please visit the Kaplan website. For any specific queries relating directly to Northumbria please contact tne@northumbria.ac.uk.

Course Information

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
16 months

Location
Various Locations

City
Newcastle

Start
September, November or May

Fee Information

Module Information

Entry Requirements 2021/22

Standard Entry

For information on entry requirements please visit the Kaplan website

Entry Requirements 2022/23

Standard Entry

For information on entry requirements please visit the Kaplan website

If you'd like to receive news and information from us in the future about the course or finance then please complete the below form

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

MP5017 -

Media Cultures (Core,20 Credits)

This explores the major trajectories of communication technology, cultural readings of communication technologies and their impact in terms of human communication, technological progression, economics, business, popular culture, and cultural human space. This module will take a case study approach to media cultures which will resonate explicitly with examples which are central to the daily lives of young people as a way to explore both these and wider issues of media and cultural engagement. Such examples include the online world of social media, the 21st century music industry and global consumer culture and can be applied to more unfamiliar media cultures. The second part of the module takes a historical turn. Moving from the contemporary to the historical gives the opportunity to reflect on the current historical moment and how this is linked to longer trajectories in the development of media cultures

More information

MP5019 -

Researching Audiences (Core,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to several things. First, it will give you a grounding in some of the main recent traditions for thinking about and researching media audiences, and the historical contexts of these; the rise of the European cultural studies approach to audiences, the mainly American mass communications approaches, the reception studies tradition, and the growing interdisciplinary field of fan studies. What links all of these approaches is an emphasis on the contexts which shape how audiences engage with and respond to different media and cultural products.

The module will also ensure you are experienced at reading and evaluating original audience and reception research. In other words, that rather than just reading second-hand summaries or excerpts, you read in detail actual empirical work in order to think about and understand the processes undertaken, and assess what distinguishes good/strong from poor/weak research.

Finally, alongside tackling the intellectual issues of audience research, the module aims to do something quite unusual – to give you experience of the processes involved, and the challenges encountered, by giving you a chance to carry out your own small piece of audience research. This necessarily has to be small-scale and preliminary, in order to fit it within the confines of one module over one semester. But working in a small group you will design, conduct and compare some different ways of learning about audience responses.

More information

MP5021 -

Media Methodologies (Core,20 Credits)

The purpose of this module is to introduce you to key theories and approaches employed when researching media, and provide you with the practical skills needed to undertake a major independent research in your final year (the dissertation). In the first half of this module, you will engage with the key processes involved in designing an academic research project, undertaking the research work and analysis, and presenting the results. In the process, you will be shown how to position your work in relation to an intellectual context; construct research questions that are practical and realistic; implement appropriate methodologies; write research proposals; and structure longer written projects (such as dissertations). The second half of the module will put research approaches in focus; academic experts will provide sessions on particular methodological approaches such as analysing media texts and archival research.

More information

MP5022 -

Cultural Identities on Screen (Core,20 Credits)

The module will focus on the televisual representation and articulation of cultural identities in Britain and the US. We will look at how gender, ethnicity, national and regional identities are constructed through an examination of different genres and areas of screen media, such as drama, comedy and current affairs. We will explore issues such as class, gender and racial stereotypes, visibility of minority groups and integration. Throughout the course we will also consider the function of television, considering what its role might be in the construction of cultural identities.

More information

MP5023 -

Media Industries (Core,20 Credits)

You will examine mass communications in the context of contemporary practices, trends, developments and trajectories that have developed and are developing within contemporary mass communication industries. The module takes a distinctive pedagogic approach in that the core of the module consists of three team-taught and research-led ‘symposiums’ that address a specific debate, development or controversy within the field of mass communication industries (broadcast, digital, advertising) and enable you to acquire a critical, multi-perspective, and evaluative grounding in the issues shaping such industries. Complementing and reinforcing the Media staff-led symposiums will be a series of lectures provided by industry guest speakers (from television, radio, advertising and digital/web companies) that will provide practical and state-of-the-art insights into key issues underpinning mass communication operations and developments. Finally, two workshop sessions will be based upon you undertaking personal research into salient issues (the front-facing components of Apple stores, the ‘brand’ and customer typology) and research-informed reflexive approaches to social networking technologies.

More information

MP5024 -

Media Events (Core,20 Credits)

Following a case study approach, you will investigate the idea of media events in historical, conceptual and organisational terms. The module will explore how particular events (e.g. media festivals and award ceremonies) are developed, structured and organised. The aim is to consider how we, as scholars of media and culture, might conceptualise events and in so doing gain a clearer understanding of their dynamics, practices and their impact upon industry and society. In this way, the module will illustrate the key ways in which specific media events have been framed in scholarship and how these ideas might begin to be applied in the real world. As such, the module encourages you to develop a critical response to media events and, in so doing, reflect upon their broader historical, cultural and socio-political significance. The lectures will introduce key concepts that will be explored in the seminars. The main part of each seminar will focus upon group tasks and discussion of the theme, specific event or set texts. Seminar discussions are also intended to develop your communication skills and your ability to develop and respond to ideas in a collaborative environment. You are expected to prepare for the sessions by studying the set text(s) for each week, and also by carrying out additional recommended reading/viewing (which will be indicated in the module guide and on the e–Learning Portal).

More information

MP6006 -

Media Dissertation (Core,40 Credits)

‘Media Dissertation’ involves the researching and writing of an 8,000-10,000 word media-related dissertation on a subject of your own choosing. You should attend a series of mandatory lecture/workshop sessions in which the fundamental requirements of preparing and researching a dissertation will be examined and explained. These sessions will be spread across semester 1 and semester 2. In Semester 1, you will develop your initial dissertation proposal up to the point where you are ready to start writing the dissertation itself. You will develop your information-retrieval skills, familiarise yourself with your chosen subject, find solutions to any problems arising out of your research design, consider the significance of any ethical constraints, formulate your principal research question, and determine the methodology you will use. You are required to complete a 2000 word dissertation plan as part of your progress (however, the module grade will be entirely assessed against your final 8000-10000 word dissertation). In Semester 2 you will develop and amend the ideas in your dissertation plan, carry out further research, prepare and write the final dissertation. Supervision will continue to be provided through regular meetings with your supervisor.

More information

MP6029 -

Cinema and Society (Core,20 Credits)

In this module, you will critically examine the relationship between US filmic institutions (films and industrial bodies – hereafter “cinema”) and different social contexts, including, for example: changes to the Hollywood Studio System (and the birthing of the “New Hollywood”), cinema’s responses to war and global trauma, and cinema’s engagement with issues surrounding race, gender and sexuality. Taught through lectures, demonstrations (film screenings) and student-led seminars, the course explores many of the ways cinema has engaged with key societal concerns.

You will be required to read and reflect on specific theoretical and empirical academic work by leading scholars and commentators and, using your analytical and interpretive skills, relate this work to the issues raised in class and by the accompanying film screenings. The module is assessed by a 3000 word essay which is designed to test your knowledge of film history and industry (one of the world's major mass communications industries), to evidence a sophisticated understanding of the issues under scrutiny, and your ability to work to a deadline. Ultimately, the module asks you to consider: What is the significance of studying cinema as a mass communications industry, an outlet for personal expression, and as a political tool? What can cinema tells us about history? What can cinema tell us about ourselves?

More information

MP6031 -

Promotional Writing (Core,20 Credits)

In this semi-practical module, you will be introduced to a range of writing skills applicable to professional practice in promotional writing, focusing on marketing materials and press releases. The module aims to develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the practices of promotional writing, the contexts and practices of professional writing, and brand promotion and engagement with the audience through text. At the end of the module you will be able to demonstrate applied writing skills in the production of promotional materials; understand the nature and purpose of a range of promotional techniques; understand the role of writing in the management of corporate, brand and product identities; and understand the relationship between persuasive text, the audience and the medium. Inevitably this module will enhance your knowledge of promotional writing techniques, and give you the skills to consider how to best produce text within promotional materials. All of these outcomes applicable to a future within the advertising or public relations industries.

More information

MP6033 -

Public Relations in Context (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to develop your understanding of the principles of Public Relations theory and concepts so you can apply them to real-world public relations strategies. You will develop your skills in presenting and working in teams. The module will enable you to utilise a case study approach, involving the analysis of a public relations scenario. You will be briefed about the case study, analyse it in teams, and then deliver an assessed pitch for a contract. The module aims to develop skill-sets that are key to working in the Public Relations industry, and which will be invaluable in terms of future employability.

More information

MP6034 -

Current Affairs in Public Relations (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to develop your understanding of the relationship between contemporary issues and Public Relations, and how both shape each other. You will learn to analyse current affairs and issues in Public Relations in the light of contemporary PR theory. You are encouraged to develop a broader knowledge of issues and developments in Public Relations by investigating the issues raised by the tutor and your peers during the seminar sessions. You are expected to read widely in PR theory, and keep abreast of current affairs and contemporary issues affecting practice.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

MP5017 -

Media Cultures (Core,20 Credits)

This explores the major trajectories of communication technology, cultural readings of communication technologies and their impact in terms of human communication, technological progression, economics, business, popular culture, and cultural human space. This module will take a case study approach to media cultures which will resonate explicitly with examples which are central to the daily lives of young people as a way to explore both these and wider issues of media and cultural engagement. Such examples include the online world of social media, the 21st century music industry and global consumer culture and can be applied to more unfamiliar media cultures. The second part of the module takes a historical turn. Moving from the contemporary to the historical gives the opportunity to reflect on the current historical moment and how this is linked to longer trajectories in the development of media cultures

More information

MP5019 -

Researching Audiences (Core,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to several things. First, it will give you a grounding in some of the main recent traditions for thinking about and researching media audiences, and the historical contexts of these; the rise of the European cultural studies approach to audiences, the mainly American mass communications approaches, the reception studies tradition, and the growing interdisciplinary field of fan studies. What links all of these approaches is an emphasis on the contexts which shape how audiences engage with and respond to different media and cultural products.

The module will also ensure you are experienced at reading and evaluating original audience and reception research. In other words, that rather than just reading second-hand summaries or excerpts, you read in detail actual empirical work in order to think about and understand the processes undertaken, and assess what distinguishes good/strong from poor/weak research.

Finally, alongside tackling the intellectual issues of audience research, the module aims to do something quite unusual – to give you experience of the processes involved, and the challenges encountered, by giving you a chance to carry out your own small piece of audience research. This necessarily has to be small-scale and preliminary, in order to fit it within the confines of one module over one semester. But working in a small group you will design, conduct and compare some different ways of learning about audience responses.

More information

MP5021 -

Media Methodologies (Core,20 Credits)

The purpose of this module is to introduce you to key theories and approaches employed when researching media, and provide you with the practical skills needed to undertake a major independent research in your final year (the dissertation). In the first half of this module, you will engage with the key processes involved in designing an academic research project, undertaking the research work and analysis, and presenting the results. In the process, you will be shown how to position your work in relation to an intellectual context; construct research questions that are practical and realistic; implement appropriate methodologies; write research proposals; and structure longer written projects (such as dissertations). The second half of the module will put research approaches in focus; academic experts will provide sessions on particular methodological approaches such as analysing media texts and archival research.

More information

MP5022 -

Cultural Identities on Screen (Core,20 Credits)

The module will focus on the televisual representation and articulation of cultural identities in Britain and the US. We will look at how gender, ethnicity, national and regional identities are constructed through an examination of different genres and areas of screen media, such as drama, comedy and current affairs. We will explore issues such as class, gender and racial stereotypes, visibility of minority groups and integration. Throughout the course we will also consider the function of television, considering what its role might be in the construction of cultural identities.

More information

MP5023 -

Media Industries (Core,20 Credits)

You will examine mass communications in the context of contemporary practices, trends, developments and trajectories that have developed and are developing within contemporary mass communication industries. The module takes a distinctive pedagogic approach in that the core of the module consists of three team-taught and research-led ‘symposiums’ that address a specific debate, development or controversy within the field of mass communication industries (broadcast, digital, advertising) and enable you to acquire a critical, multi-perspective, and evaluative grounding in the issues shaping such industries. Complementing and reinforcing the Media staff-led symposiums will be a series of lectures provided by industry guest speakers (from television, radio, advertising and digital/web companies) that will provide practical and state-of-the-art insights into key issues underpinning mass communication operations and developments. Finally, two workshop sessions will be based upon you undertaking personal research into salient issues (the front-facing components of Apple stores, the ‘brand’ and customer typology) and research-informed reflexive approaches to social networking technologies.

More information

MP5024 -

Media Events (Core,20 Credits)

Following a case study approach, you will investigate the idea of media events in historical, conceptual and organisational terms. The module will explore how particular events (e.g. media festivals and award ceremonies) are developed, structured and organised. The aim is to consider how we, as scholars of media and culture, might conceptualise events and in so doing gain a clearer understanding of their dynamics, practices and their impact upon industry and society. In this way, the module will illustrate the key ways in which specific media events have been framed in scholarship and how these ideas might begin to be applied in the real world. As such, the module encourages you to develop a critical response to media events and, in so doing, reflect upon their broader historical, cultural and socio-political significance. The lectures will introduce key concepts that will be explored in the seminars. The main part of each seminar will focus upon group tasks and discussion of the theme, specific event or set texts. Seminar discussions are also intended to develop your communication skills and your ability to develop and respond to ideas in a collaborative environment. You are expected to prepare for the sessions by studying the set text(s) for each week, and also by carrying out additional recommended reading/viewing (which will be indicated in the module guide and on the e–Learning Portal).

More information

MP6006 -

Media Dissertation (Core,40 Credits)

‘Media Dissertation’ involves the researching and writing of an 8,000-10,000 word media-related dissertation on a subject of your own choosing. You should attend a series of mandatory lecture/workshop sessions in which the fundamental requirements of preparing and researching a dissertation will be examined and explained. These sessions will be spread across semester 1 and semester 2. In Semester 1, you will develop your initial dissertation proposal up to the point where you are ready to start writing the dissertation itself. You will develop your information-retrieval skills, familiarise yourself with your chosen subject, find solutions to any problems arising out of your research design, consider the significance of any ethical constraints, formulate your principal research question, and determine the methodology you will use. You are required to complete a 2000 word dissertation plan as part of your progress (however, the module grade will be entirely assessed against your final 8000-10000 word dissertation). In Semester 2 you will develop and amend the ideas in your dissertation plan, carry out further research, prepare and write the final dissertation. Supervision will continue to be provided through regular meetings with your supervisor.

More information

MP6029 -

Cinema and Society (Core,20 Credits)

In this module, you will critically examine the relationship between US filmic institutions (films and industrial bodies – hereafter “cinema”) and different social contexts, including, for example: changes to the Hollywood Studio System (and the birthing of the “New Hollywood”), cinema’s responses to war and global trauma, and cinema’s engagement with issues surrounding race, gender and sexuality. Taught through lectures, demonstrations (film screenings) and student-led seminars, the course explores many of the ways cinema has engaged with key societal concerns.

You will be required to read and reflect on specific theoretical and empirical academic work by leading scholars and commentators and, using your analytical and interpretive skills, relate this work to the issues raised in class and by the accompanying film screenings. The module is assessed by a 3000 word essay which is designed to test your knowledge of film history and industry (one of the world's major mass communications industries), to evidence a sophisticated understanding of the issues under scrutiny, and your ability to work to a deadline. Ultimately, the module asks you to consider: What is the significance of studying cinema as a mass communications industry, an outlet for personal expression, and as a political tool? What can cinema tells us about history? What can cinema tell us about ourselves?

More information

MP6031 -

Promotional Writing (Core,20 Credits)

In this semi-practical module, you will be introduced to a range of writing skills applicable to professional practice in promotional writing, focusing on marketing materials and press releases. The module aims to develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the practices of promotional writing, the contexts and practices of professional writing, and brand promotion and engagement with the audience through text. At the end of the module you will be able to demonstrate applied writing skills in the production of promotional materials; understand the nature and purpose of a range of promotional techniques; understand the role of writing in the management of corporate, brand and product identities; and understand the relationship between persuasive text, the audience and the medium. Inevitably this module will enhance your knowledge of promotional writing techniques, and give you the skills to consider how to best produce text within promotional materials. All of these outcomes applicable to a future within the advertising or public relations industries.

More information

MP6033 -

Public Relations in Context (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to develop your understanding of the principles of Public Relations theory and concepts so you can apply them to real-world public relations strategies. You will develop your skills in presenting and working in teams. The module will enable you to utilise a case study approach, involving the analysis of a public relations scenario. You will be briefed about the case study, analyse it in teams, and then deliver an assessed pitch for a contract. The module aims to develop skill-sets that are key to working in the Public Relations industry, and which will be invaluable in terms of future employability.

More information

MP6034 -

Current Affairs in Public Relations (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to develop your understanding of the relationship between contemporary issues and Public Relations, and how both shape each other. You will learn to analyse current affairs and issues in Public Relations in the light of contemporary PR theory. You are encouraged to develop a broader knowledge of issues and developments in Public Relations by investigating the issues raised by the tutor and your peers during the seminar sessions. You are expected to read widely in PR theory, and keep abreast of current affairs and contemporary issues affecting practice.

More information

Any Questions?

Our admissions team will be happy to help. They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901.

Contact Details for Applicants:

tne@northumbria.ac.uk

All information on this course page is accurate at the time of viewing.

Courses starting in 2021 are offered as a mix of face to face and online learning. We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to flex accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with additional restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors, potentially to a full online offer, should further restrictions be deemed necessary in future.

Our online activity will be delivered through Blackboard Ultra, enabling collaboration, connection and engagement with materials and people.

 

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.


Your Learning Experience find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions - northumbria.ac.uk/terms
Fees and Funding - northumbria.ac.uk/fees
Admissions Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy
Admissions Complaints Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/complaints




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