Skip navigation

Enter your details to receive an email with a link to a downloadable PDF of this course and to receive the latest news and information from Northumbria University

* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

CLOSE

Do you have a passion for music? Do you want to develop your performing skills alongside music history in a degree that offers a focus on employability?

Music at Northumbria University offers performance modules centred on a generous provision of individual instrumental/vocal tuition, an intellectually stimulating study of music history and modules in instrumental/vocal teaching, whilst providing you with the essential skills you will need to succeed in the music profession.

The course will provide you with an in-depth understanding of the richness of music making in the past and the present. You will hone your performance skills to a high level, and follow a distinctive programme that prepares you for a wide range of careers and for freelance work where you may combine performing with teaching and arts administration. You will develop skills – in music theory, techniques of composition and on the keyboard – which you need to succeed as a creative musician in the twenty-first century.

Our approach to performance, history and employability is holistic. You will learn how music is made, how it is consumed, and how it relates to cultural change: studying music from the middle ages to the present day. These historical themes will shape you as a performer who understands audience engagement with music in the past, the present and the future. Our performance and history modules will connect you to the wider city and community, through partnerships with cultural organisations, such as the Newcastle Lit and Phil Library and Newcastle Cathedral.

The degree has been designed alongside a Foundation Year in Music, which offers an opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills needed for degree-level work.

What makes our degree distinctive is the way in which your real-life work as a musician is prepared through a specially tailored programme in which, in addition to your performing and musicological studies, you will learn how to teach your instrument and how to manage in your career as a musician.


Study Music at Northumbria from Northumbria University on Vimeo.

Do you have a passion for music? Do you want to develop your performing skills alongside music history in a degree that offers a focus on employability?

Music at Northumbria University offers performance modules centred on a generous provision of individual instrumental/vocal tuition, an intellectually stimulating study of music history and modules in instrumental/vocal teaching, whilst providing you with the essential skills you will need to succeed in the music profession.

The course will provide you with an in-depth understanding of the richness of music making in the past and the present. You will hone your performance skills to a high level, and follow a distinctive programme that prepares you for a wide range of careers and for freelance work where you may combine performing with teaching and arts administration. You will develop skills – in music theory, techniques of composition and on the keyboard – which you need to succeed as a creative musician in the twenty-first century.

Our approach to performance, history and employability is holistic. You will learn how music is made, how it is consumed, and how it relates to cultural change: studying music from the middle ages to the present day. These historical themes will shape you as a performer who understands audience engagement with music in the past, the present and the future. Our performance and history modules will connect you to the wider city and community, through partnerships with cultural organisations, such as the Newcastle Lit and Phil Library and Newcastle Cathedral.

The degree has been designed alongside a Foundation Year in Music, which offers an opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills needed for degree-level work.

What makes our degree distinctive is the way in which your real-life work as a musician is prepared through a specially tailored programme in which, in addition to your performing and musicological studies, you will learn how to teach your instrument and how to manage in your career as a musician.


Study Music at Northumbria from Northumbria University on Vimeo.

Course Information

UCAS Code
W320

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Humanities

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2020

Department / Humanities

Our Department of Humanities includes the subject areas of History, English Literature, English Language and Linguistics, Creative Writing, American Studies and Music.

Book an Open Day / Experience Music BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Music. Speak to staff from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

In performance, one-to-one teaching on your instrument or voice is complemented by seminars which cover areas such as practising, performance anxiety and interpretation, as well as providing a forum in which you can perform to your peers. There are opportunities to perform both on campus and further afield, to attend concerts and open rehearsals, and to participate in masterclasses.

There is a practical dimension to studying music history at Northumbria, which introduces you to how to research music. You will find yourself off-campus, visiting libraries, archives and other institutions where you will engage with original source materials. More traditional teaching methods still have their place: lectures provide you with information and prompts for further reading; seminars may be based around group discussion of musical texts or broader questions, and are often led by students.

The course allows you to develop the practical skills required for a portfolio career, and includes modules in instrumental teaching, personal enterprise and business. Our course embeds these skills from the outset, which will prepare you for a future professional career in music. You will be encouraged to identify the skills required in both musical and non-musical careers.

Book an Open Day / Experience Music BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Music. Speak to staff from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Our staff are internationally renowned specialists in their fields and, having previously held positions in various universities across the UK, they are highly experienced in undergraduate teaching. With their areas of expertise ranging from 16th-century music and performance practice to the history of instruments and American popular music, you will benefit from learning from outstanding scholars. You will also engage with external professionals working in various areas of music and the arts who will give lectures, recitals and masterclasses to enhance your performing and professional skills. You will receive tuition from one of our highly accomplished and experienced instrumental and vocal specialists.

A personal tutor will be assigned to you during induction week who will help you manage the transition to university smoothly and successfully. They will continue to provide support for both your personal and academic development throughout the course of the degree programme.

The programme leader and module tutors also play active roles in guiding you through your degree with specific time allocated to students to allow for private feedback and consultation, giving you a great deal of individual attention.

Staff / Meet the Team

Our students learn from the best inspirational academic staff with a genuine passion for their subject.

Book an Open Day / Music BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Music. Speak to staff from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Your learning environment will be both colourful and dynamic. You will study within an interdisciplinary Humanities environment, which itself is part of a faculty containing performing arts.

There are specialist, dedicated music spaces for teaching and learning, including soundproofed facilities to allow you to practise, alongside a range of instruments available to support your performance skills. Other teaching spaces are shared with performing arts students. Concerts take place on campus in the Great Hall, which is ideal for smaller scale performances, and elsewhere in the City, making good use of our partnerships with various organisations. For example, concerts often take place in Newcastle Cathedral, a venue well suited to larger-scale performances involving orchestras, bands and choirs. You will have access to software such as Sibelius on computers equipped with midi keyboards, as well as use of computer suites across campus for the completion of written work.

The University library, including books, reference works and a range of digital resources, will be available to you throughout the entirety of your study. You will benefit from our state-of-the-art electronic reading lists, which allow you to access resources for each module directly, and our electronic learning platform, Blackboard, will help you make the most of your independent study time.

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Experience Music BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Music. Speak to staff from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

All music staff at Northumbria are engaged with producing research in their respective fields at an international level, and the team contains active professional performers. Their research is embedded into the degree at every level, which greatly enriches the study of music. As a student, you will be taught by everyone in the team right from the start of your degree. You will have opportunities to develop an understanding of how to research music through visits to libraries, archives and other institutions containing original source materials. This brings music history to life, and provides an opportunity for you to discover music that you can develop through your own performances.

Throughout the duration of this course, you will experience research- and practice-informed teaching, which is both contemporary and innovative and will allow you to develop your musical skills and academic knowledge.

Book an Open Day / Experience Music BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Music. Speak to staff from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Our aim is to produce graduates who are creative thinkers, with the ability to apply their in-depth knowledge of music in a professional setting. At Northumbria, our partnerships with cultural organisations, such as the Newcastle Cathedral and Newcastle Lit & Phil, will expose you to real working and performance environments. Your engagement with teaching opportunities, and your growing understanding of the music industry, will shape you into a musician ready for a freelance portfolio career and to set yourself up in business.

You will be able to gain experience valuable to the world of arts administration, and there is an additional option to take a year of work experience, or study abroad, in the middle of your degree.

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Experience Music BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Music. Speak to staff from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Embedded throughout the degree are modules that will prepare you for the world of work. All musicians will at some point teach their instrument, which is why we provide modules that prepare you for music teaching.  Today’s musicians are generally self-employed, undertaking a range of different kinds of work. The modules offered on this course will prepare you with the skills necessary for managing your career as a musician. You will develop a historical understanding of music past and present, and skills in theory, techniques of composition and keyboard playing, which you will need to succeed as a creative musician in the twenty-first century.

When you graduate, you will be in an ideal position to go on to postgraduate study. The teaching components of the degree provide an excellent preparation for a PGCE in primary or secondary classroom teaching, and the final-year business option equips you for a Master’s degree in Cultural and Creative Industries Management at Northumbria. Performers will be in a position to audition for postgraduate study at music conservatoires around the country, and other students will be able to continue their musicological studies at Master’s level.

Book an Open Day / Experience Music BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Music. Speak to staff from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Who would this Course suit?

The course is suitable for those who wish to develop their musical performance abilities, alongside enhancing their knowledge of musical history. 

Entry Requirements 2020/21

Standard Entry

120 UCAS Tariff points
From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas or the International Baccalaureate

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Subject Requirements:

Performing at grade 7 level or above in Music Performance, or a recognised equivalent.

GCSE Requirements:

Students will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4 or C, or the equivalent.

Additional Requirements: 

Applicants may be required to submit a video recording demonstrating their performance ability.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match those shown above. If you have taken qualifications outside the UK you can find out how your qualifications compare by visiting our country page www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:
International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications 

Fees and Funding 2020/21 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: TBC

Undergraduate fees are set by Government and are subject to annual review. Once these have been approved we will update fees/funding information for UK and EU students.


International Fee in Year 1: £15,500

Scholarships for 2020/2021 entry have not been announced. Please visit the 2019/2020 international scholarship page for the 2019/2020 scholarship offer.


ADDITIONAL COSTS

TBC


FUNDING INFORMATION

20/21 fees and funding information has not been confirmed. 19/20 information is listed below.

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for UK/EU undergraduate tuition fee information**.

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information.

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying.

Click here for information on fee liability.

If you'd like to receive news and information from us in the future about the course or finance then please complete the below form

* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

HI4007 -

Making History (Core,20 Credits)

History is not only characterised by knowledge and understanding of past developments, but also by a broad range of skills and methods that are directly applicable to academic research. Within this wider context, this module will give you a firm grounding in the skills and methods needed for the study of history, introducing you to a range of source materials from a broad chronological spectrum. In so doing, the module explores traditions in criticism and explains the ways in which sources can be read and utilised. The module is structured along four ‘core skills’ blocks (Studying & Presenting History, Approaches to History, Researching & Interpreting History, and Feedback and Careers) which progress logically from each other and provide students with ample opportunities to engage with how historians make history. The first block introduces you to the study of History, specifically the questions of what a historian does, why society values historians, and the key skills of historians. The block also develops skills in three areas: (1) writing history; (2) reading history; (3) presenting history. The second block examines key approaches to the study of the past and allows you to demonstrate the skills gained in block one. Block three concentrates on how to find primary sources, how to read them, and how to deploy them in written work. The final block introduces you to careers in and beyond History, and asks you to reflect on your progress over the year. You will develop a critical capacity to scrutinize sources and interpretations of the past.

More information

MU4001 -

Millennium of Music (Core,20 Credits)

This course will open your ears to a wide range of repertoire from plainchant to contemporary Western art music. The notions of ‘Classical’ or ‘Western Art Music’ are problematic, not least because they encompass music composed over more than a millennium. You will be exposed to a broad range of music, much of which will be new to you. You will explore some of the principal musical developments from about 900AD to the present day, looking at how music was created and preserved through notation and, later, recorded sound. Although much of the repertoire you will be studying is now heard in concert hall and recital, you will discover the contexts for which it was originally intended, and the function that it played in society at large. This course will give you a clear and broad grasp of the shape of musical, cultural and intellectual history alongside more detailed studies of individual musical works, whilst engaging with questions of how histories of music are constructed. The module will provide a framework to which you will be able to relate more detailed and specialist studies of music.

We will begin with the relatively familiar (Beethoven and his time), and move forwards chronologically to the present day. Then, after Christmas, we will move backwards from Beethoven, ending in the Middle Ages.

More information

MU4002 -

Performance 1 (Core,20 Credits)

This module is focused on your individual, one-to-one instrumental or vocal tuition. Working with a specialist on your instrument/voice, you will consolidate your technique while developing skills in performing music which will enable you to communicate effectively with an audience. The module will cover areas such as effective practising and dealing with performance anxiety, and you will research the history of your instrument. You will expand your repertoire, and engage critically with musical performance through attendance at concerts, recitals and open rehearsals.

More information

MU4003 -

Techniques of Composition, Harmonic Analysis and Improvisation (Core,20 Credits)

In this module, you will explore how music is made through the study of techniques of composition. It provides an opportunity for you to develop a knowledge of harmony in order to enhance your skillset for further musicological study, and to inform your work as a performer. Focusing on the late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century music, you will explore a range of genres, such as the piano sonata, string quartet and lied. Analytical work is intended to aid an understanding of harmonic progressions, and you will learn how to employ two systems to describe harmony (figured bass and Roman numerals). Students produce weekly harmony assignments which may include analytical exercises, harmony exercises and pastiche composition. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the distinctions between composer, improviser and performer were much less distinct than today, and we will explore improvisation in historic styles.

More information

MU4004 -

Essential Skills for the 21st-Century Musician (Core,20 Credits)

In this module, you will develop skills which you will find to be essential for advanced study in music, and for your future career in music.

You will need to be able to make sense of music at the keyboard, whether as an academic researcher trying out a piece of music for which there is no recording, or a performer, or a teacher needing to provide some sort of an accompaniment for their pupils. You will develop the keyboard skills necessary for a freelance career, including chord progressions, sight-reading, accompanying, and how to simplify accompaniments to make them playable at your level of keyboard proficiency.

You need to be comfortable and confident in directing other musicians of all abilities and experience. The module will develop your skills in conducting, giving guidance on score preparation as well as the practicalities of communicating to players and singers.

Often, musicians need to be able to communicate with one another through the use of the singing voice, and you well develop the vocal skills you need to give you confidence to do this.

You will also cover the knowledge and skills needed by freelance musicians in marketing and self-promotion, time management, finance and tax, contracts and copyright, health & safety and safeguarding.

More information

MU4005 -

Introduction to Music Education (Core,20 Credits)

All musicians are music teachers of their instrument or voice at some point, and it is vital that their experience of teaching is based on a solid foundation of pedagogical research and a knowledge of the context in which their work is taking place.

This module offers an introduction to music education, covering early years, primary, secondary and special schools, so that your music teaching will be informed by your knowledge of pupils’ broader educational experience. This will also open up other possible career paths in music education.

You will also begin to gain experience in music teaching by giving lessons to one of your peers in your instrument while reflecting on your own experience of learning a new instrument taught by a fellow classmate.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AH5011 -

Debating Issues in the Cultural Industries (Optional,20 Credits)

This module examines the roles and responsibilities of the cultural industries, and how they are influenced by changing ethical concerns, public policy, and attitudes in the popular media. You will study alongside students in art and design, investigating art, design and music institutions and their practices, examining core institutional roles and beliefs and recent shifts in cultural management practices and the contextualisation of art, design and music. The roles of curators, publishers (including record labels), broadcasters and collection or event managers will be analysed in a continually developing cultural environment, dominated as much by digital sites of cultural exchange, as bricks and mortar institutions.

You will be introduced to concepts regarding the management and display of art and design, alongside music management, and debate how these work in reality, discussing issues such as diversity, audiences, access, inclusion, and freedom of speech. Emphasis will be on careful consideration of how the cultural industries can serve society, but also how they react to social concerns, questions of elitism, obscenity or offence, alternative histories and creative interventions in the public sphere. The module will encourage you to think critically about the functions of the cultural industries. It will also work in conjunction with other music modules, such as those in performance and music teaching, to prompt you to consider the impact of questions of difference upon your own future profession. Based around dynamic discussion, the module will culminate in a group task in which you will vigorously debate a current issue in the institutional environment.

More information

MU5001 -

Making Music History (Core,20 Credits)

In this module, you will consider how histories of music are constructed. Who decides what should be included within the narrative and what is the significance of what is left out? To what extent are we constrained by the available evidence? To what extent do the music histories we write reflect our present-day concerns?

You will engage critically with different approaches to writing music history, from the development of musical styles to in-depth socio-cultural studies, and to strategies for structuring our conception of music history. You will also consider how and why particular composers and repertory become dominant in our understanding of music history, and what the consequences of this might be.

You will also explore the different kinds of sources that music historians use – not only scores or recordings, but iconographical, archival or other historical material – exploring what they can reveal about the creation, consumption and functions of music in the past, and their limitations.

Within this module, you will develop a critical capacity to scrutinise sources and evaluate the way they have been interpreted in the creation of music history whilst engaging with a range of music from a variety of periods.

More information

MU5002 -

Music History Project (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to equip you with the research skills you need in order to carry out original, independent research in Music. It serves as a preparation for the dissertation you will write in your final year of study. You will have the opportunity to write an extended essay on a topic of your choice within a number of possible areas. In doing so, you will gain an understanding of how to frame research questions and arrive at a title, how to manage a project working independently, how to find primary and secondary sources, how to present your work and develop your academic writing.

More information

MU5003 -

Performance 2 (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is focused on your individual, one-to-one instrumental or vocal tuition. You will develop your technique while enhancing skills in performing music which will enable you to communicate effectively with an audience. The course will cover areas such as effective practising, performance contexts and how to manage nerves. You will continue to expand your repertoire, gaining an awareness of performing traditions associated with the music you are playing or singing as you are introduced to the study of performance practice. You will continue to engage critically with musical performance through attendance at concerts, recitals and open rehearsals.

More information

MU5004 -

Recital 1 (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is focused on your individual, one-to-one instrumental or vocal tuition. You will develop your technique while enhancing skills in performing music which will enable you to communicate effectively with an audience in a recital open to the general public. The seminars will focus on how to structure a recital programme and how to write effective programme notes. You will continue to engage critically with musical performance through attendance at concerts, recitals and open rehearsals, focusing especially on programme structure.

More information

MU5005 -

Techniques of Composition, Harmonic Analysis and Improvisation 2 (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module, you will build on the core first-year course, Techniques of Composition, Harmonic Analysis and Improvisation. The module focuses on more advanced harmonic progressions including the use of dominant 13th, diminished 7th, Neapolitan 6th and Augmented 6th chords, and on broader tonal structures.

Students produce weekly harmony assignments which may include analytical exercises, harmony exercises and pastiche composition. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the distinctions between composer, improviser and performer were much less distinct than today, and we will explore repertoire through improvisation.

More information

MU5006 -

History of Musical Instruments (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the study of musical instruments, known as organology, and examines their use, construction, and position within society. As the principal voices of music, musical instruments serve as vehicles for composers’ ideas. However, the instruments are more than just tools of performance, allowing us to observe a variety of cultural facets, such as our sociocultural history, from a unique angle. Their importance has woven them into our wider cultural backdrop, featuring in literature and iconographical sources, and many musical instruments are works of art in their own right. These interconnections across the humanities prove that the instruments are about more than just the music that they perform.

Through the lens of musical instruments, the lectures will address topics such as gender, sexuality, social class, and race, shedding light on the evolution of society over the course of approximately 500 years. The consideration of scores in tandem with organological analysis will introduce you to the skills behind material musicology (the analysis of scores with consideration of the instrument), and will approach aspects of performance practice from the angle of instrument capability. The module will address current, historical, and world instruments to provide you with a broad understanding and appreciation of different musical cultures and the intersections that occur between the traditions. You will therefore be introduced to research skills that utilise materials beyond contemporary books and journals, while also developing an understanding of organological theories and methodologies that can be assimilated into your own performance studies.

More information

MU5007 -

Preparation for Music Teaching (Optional,20 Credits)

Having been introduced to music’s place in the classroom curriculum in your first year, and having had some teaching experience working with your peers, this course pays closer attention to music pedagogy in general, and gives you the opportunity to experience genuine teaching situations outside the classroom, reflecting on what you learn from the observation of others. You also continue with your practical work, either giving and receiving lessons by working with someone in the class who plays your instrument, or by working with other students who play an instrument belonging to the same family (brass, woodwind, strings etc.), or by carrying on with the instrument you started as a beginner in first year.

More information

TE5507 -

Student Tutoring (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn how to be a tutor of students in schools or colleges. You will develop your skills in communicating effectively with children or young people. As part of this process you will learn how to evaluate your own learning of how to support these pupils’ learning over a series of lessons. You will be learning how to transmit your own enthusiasm for learning in a professional context to pupils within the schooling system. You will learn about the issues facing teachers and other professionals within the school, college or learning centre. Learning how to apply your existing skills and knowledge in a work related context will be an important focus of this module for you. Knowing how to determine which skills and knowledge are relevant, and make appropriate use of these in the work context, will be a major learning opportunity for you.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5009 -

Humanities Work Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks. You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AD5010 -

Humanities Study Abroad Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

HI6033 -

The Art of Power: Tudor Court Culture (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will take an interdisciplinary approach to Tudor history, investigating how and why courtly arts were important to the construction and projection of political power in Tudor England.

You will learn about the distinctive political and religious context of each monarch’s reign from Henry VII to Elizabeth I and explore a range of courtly arts such as portraiture, drama and spectacle, poetry and literary, and music and dance. You will analyse the influence of arts and entertainments that were grand and public, and also those that were private and intimate. You will consider questions such as: why was artistic patronage important for the Tudor monarchy? What influence did age and gender have on royal image-making? How could the arts become tools of governance or play a role in diplomatic manoeuvres? To what extent were monarchs in control of their royal image? How could courtiers and noblemen manipulate courtly arts for their own ends?

Throughout the module you will engage with current research in a range of disciplines including political history, Reformation history, art history, English literature, gender studies and music. Moreover you will develop skills in interpreting and evaluating visual, textual and musical sources in light of their historical context. (No musical literacy is required).

More information

MI6005 -

Popular Music on Film and Television (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is concerned with popular music culture and its relationship to film, an area much neglected in academic film studies, television studies and popular music studies. As such, it seeks to address this absence by looking at a number of key junctures where popular music culture, the cinema and television inter-relate, exploring debates about gender representation, authorship, genre and music in performance, as well as how the films studied relate to context of their production and reception. The module, therefore, covers topics such as the following in a largely chronological fashion. An indicative syllabus is as follows:
1. Early moments: The significance of the early Elvis Films: King Creole
2. Punk rock on film: The Great Rock n’ Roll Swindle
3. The revisionist musical: Von Trier, Lhurmann et al
4. Popular Music and national identity: The Commitments
5. Popular Music and ‘Race’ representation: 8 Mile
6. Gender play: Velvet Goldmine, In Bed with Madonna
7. The popular music / rock documentary
8. Dance and the male body: Saturday Night Fever
9. The concert film" from Wadleigh's Woodstock to Godard's One plus One.
10. Critical approaches to music video: Corbijn, Cunningham et al.
11. Nostalgia and the popular musical biopic: Control

More information

MU6001 -

Dissertation in Music (Core,40 Credits)

The dissertation is the culmination of your work in researching, thinking and writing about Music. It offers an opportunity to carry out some independent research on a topic about which you are really passionate. Working with your supervisor, you will identify a topic, propose a title and devise some research questions. You will develop skills in project management, research and writing, and experience the process of recrafting what you have written in response to feedback. With a high degree of self-motivation, you will produce a major piece of written work of which you can be proud. Your dissertation will prepare you to continue to be an independent thinker, whether you go on to further study, enter a profession related to Music, or enter the graduate jobs market.

More information

MU6002 -

Performance 3 (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is focused on your individual, one-to-one instrumental or vocal tuition. You will develop your technique to an advanced level while enhancing skills in performing music which will enable you to communicate effectively with an audience. You will continue to expand your repertoire, and building on the Performance 2 module, you will engage with aspects of Performance Practice related to your own instrument or voice. You will continue to engage critically with musical performance through attendance at concerts, recitals and open rehearsals.

More information

MU6003 -

Recital 2 (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is focused on your individual, one-to-one instrumental or vocal tuition. You will develop your technique to an advanced level while developing professional skills in performing music which will enable you to communicate effectively with an audience in a recital open to the general public. Seminars will provide an opportunity to perform in front of your peers, and you will focus on how to structure a recital programme and how to write effective programme notes. You will continue to engage critically with musical performance through attendance at concerts, recitals and open rehearsals.

More information

MU6004 -

Seventeenth-Century Keyboard Music in the British Isles: its Creation, Use and Place in Society (Optional,20 Credits)

This course involves a study of keyboard music mainly by William Byrd and his contemporaries, and examines the way keyboard music was used in the home by amateur players. As well as repertoire by named composers, it covers the contexts in which such music was played, the instruments it was played upon and aspects of performance practice. It combines musicological with a practical element: students of all levels of keyboard proficiency from beginner to advanced will have the opportunity to learn from playing.

English seventeenth-century keyboard music will be studied from a number of perspectives. Students are introduced to manuscript sources of the music, the editorial principles underlying approaches to modern editions of the repertoire, and the relation between composer, scribe and performer. The traditional notion of the period in the mid-century being a 'transition' between the so-called virginalist school and that of Purcell and his contemporaries will be challenged by examining whether the repertoire should be regarded as functional or autonomous. Pieces representative composers will be introduced in relation to genre distinctions, and especially instrumental designation. Elements of performance practice, such as the interpretation of ornaments and early fingering, will be covered through practical sessions.

More information

MU6005 -

The Craft of the Music Teacher (Optional,20 Credits)

You will explore the research literature on music pedagogy as it relates to learning an instrument, and build up resources that you will need for a successful teaching practice, including an evaluation of instrumental methods and the development of repertoire lists for your instrument. You will go on a serial placement with an experienced peripatetic and/or private music teacher of your instrument/voice, observing their teaching practice and teaching lessons under their supervision.

More information

VA6004 -

Music, Festivals & Events for Music Students (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will immerse you in the contemporary world of festivals, events and music management. You will be equipped and encouraged to critically evaluate economic, cultural, social, environmental and urban issues in music and the arts in general, developing an understanding of the role that festivals and events (including, but not limited to music) play in contemporary cultural life. . You will explore the importance of topics such as digital technologies, artists, audiences, marketing, risk, impacts and money to the industry. You will be challenged to think critically and creatively about the why, who and how of music, festival and events management, as a specialist area of the cultural and creative industries sector. Sessions will include hands-on planning and programming as well as instruction and seminars by experienced professionals.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

Any Questions?

Our admissions team will be happy to help. They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901.

Contact Details for Applicants:

bc.applicantservices@northumbria.ac.uk

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.

Your Learning Experience find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions - northumbria.ac.uk/terms
Fees and Funding - northumbria.ac.uk/fees
Admissions Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy
Admissions Complaints Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/complaints

Order your prospectus

If you're a UK/EU student and would like to know more about our courses, you can order a copy of our prospectus here.

Get a downloadable PDF of this course and updates from Humanities

Enter your details to receive an email with a link to a downloadable PDF of this course and to receive the latest news and information from Northumbria University

* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

+

Northumbria Open Days

Open Days are a great way for you to get a feel of the University, the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and the course(s) you are interested in.

+
+

Virtual Tour

Get an insight into life at Northumbria at the click of a button! Come and explore our videos and 360 panoramas to immerse yourself in our campuses and get a feel for what it is like studying here using our interactive virtual tour.

Back to top