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Policing is undergoing far-reaching transformations in terms of rapidly changing crime types, diverse public expectations and technological developments that will continue to alter the ways in which policing is done. Our exciting new degree programme in Policing will offer a unique insight into contemporary law enforcement, the role of the Police in society, and the challenges they face. Key to the transformation of policing is the better development and application of research evidence, science and analysis to generate new approaches to established and emerging law enforcement activity.

The BSc in Professional Policing at Northumbria University is a research rich programme which draws from criminology, law, forensic science, fraud management and investigation, and cybercrime. You will learn from the experts, from a range of subject-area backgrounds, about the future challenges facing contemporary policing and the innovative responses being developed to address them. The policing degree will address critical questions that span expertise in Social Sciences, Law, Psychology, and Business allowing you to explore problems not only from a criminological, but also a sociological, legal and cultural perspective relating to the role, function and philosophical approaches to policing.  

Northumbria University is licensed by the College of Policing to deliver the Pre-join Degree in Professional Policing and meets all the requirements of their national curriculum. Please note that there are no guarantees of entry to a police force post-completion of the BSc (Hons) Professional Policing.  The recruitment process for joining police forces is separate and each police force specifies its own entry requirements.

Course Information

UCAS Code
LL44

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time

Department
Social Sciences

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019 or September 2020

Fee Information

Module Information

Department / Social Sciences

Our Department of Social Sciences is a community that equips you to make a positive social change, become a critical thinker, a problem solver, and to challenge what you think, see and hear.

Book an Open Day / Professional Policing BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Professional Policing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

The BSc Professional Policing will encompass the national curriculum for the professional education of people seeking entry into policing at the level of police constable.

The policing specific curriculum has been designed by the College of Policing (the professional body for all those working in the police service) to be professionally transformative.  The curriculum reflects the contemporary areas of knowledge, skills and professional practice essential to the 21st century police constable role. 

These include (but are not limited to): evidence-based policing; decision making and discretion; criminology and crime prevention; pro-active approaches to vulnerability, risk and public protection; and modern policing trends such as digital policing.

Book an Open Day / Experience Professional Policing BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Professional Policing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Academics from our team are helping shape tomorrow by carrying out significant research which directly informs and impacts upon policing policy and practice. The staff delivering this programme have very strong track-records in conducting research on policing and engage regularly with local, national and international police services. You will be learning from people at the cutting-edge of contemporary policing practice.

When studying the Professional Policing course you will be taught by our experienced and inspirational staff who bring their wealth of knowledge in the sector, as well as a strong background in research, to the classroom.  Academic staff teaching on the programme will be drawn from Criminology, Law, Business, Forensic Science, Leadership and Management, Digital Forensics, Media, Psychology and Social Work, allowing us to offer a multi-disciplinary approach to the teaching and learning experience on the programme.

Book an Open Day / Experience Professional Policing BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Professional Policing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

As a student on the BSc Professional Policing, you will have access to unrivalled facilities located at our City Campus including: the specially designed courtroom equipped with DVD recording, enabling students to gain real-life exposure to the courtroom environment and develop their practical skills and experience mock trials; the brand new dedicated Computer Network Technology and Digital Security labs and open access computing areas; the comprehensive media centre with television and radio studios; as well as our bespoke crime scene house for mock crime scene investigations.

The City Campus University Library is open 24/7 during term time providing learning spaces, scholarly resources, online services, and opportunities to develop learning skills. 

We complement our classroom learning through our online virtual learning environment, where we direct you to electronic learning sources and compose video podcasts and online quizzes to consolidate and evaluate your acquired knowledge.

Facilities / Professional Policing BSc (Hons)

Book an Open Day / Experience Professional Policing BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Professional Policing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

As Northumbria University has developed considerable expertise working with police forces regionally, nationally, and internationally, this sustained excellence in police research is a unique strength and advantage as this work will support the design, development and delivery of this programme. The world-leading and internationally-excellent research conducted at Northumbria University helps to develop the evidence base for contemporary policing.

  • Our work is characterised as:
  • Informing policy and practice.
  • Providing wide-ranging, cutting-edge science and applied research.
  • Working in partnership with the Police and agencies regionally, nationally, within European networks and internationally.

You can read more about the research we carry out, as well as upcoming seminar events, on our Police Research and Education Network webpage.

Research / Social Sciences

Book an Open Day / Experience Professional Policing BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Professional Policing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

The professional aim of the programme is to equip learners with the relevant knowledge needed to pursue a career in the police service at the rank of constable.

The benefits of the programme also encompass higher level skills including problem-solving, critical and analytical reflection, communication, and leadership. The programme will also involve working with external stakeholders in policing to enhance relevance in the policing area.  For example, as a student on the BSc Professional Policing course, you can undertake a placement activity with the police as part of your academic study; you can also act as an independent stop and search scrutiny panel member. 

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Experience Professional Policing BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Professional Policing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

This three-year knowledge-based degree will equip you with the practical experience and theoretical knowledge now required to join the Police force as a Police Constable in England and Wales.  With the additional opportunities on the programme to gain practical experience through volunteering within the criminal justice system, our graduates may also go on to work within the wider criminal justice system.  Overall this dynamic programme will develop your understanding of the complex relationship between theory and practice, providing a great start to a career in the field of policing and criminal justice.

Book an Open Day / Experience Professional Policing BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Professional Policing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Your course in brief

Year 1

Year one Your first year in Professional Policing will teach you how to investigate in an effective manner, work well within a team and how to take charge in high pressure situations. The course will also give you a a grounding in the modern types of crime such as digital and teach you the law surrounding criminal cases.

Year 2

Year two While studying in your second year, you will be taught forensic techniques and how an evidence based approach is the core of modern day policing. The modules will also teach you about the sociological and criminological causes of crime and offence as well as the professional standards expected of an officer.

Year 3

Year three Third year offers a wide range of optional modules to allow you to tailor your education to suit your future career. Some of the core modules include advanced digital forensics and putting your education in real world context. You may also choose to do a dissertation or a work experience dissertation.

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent. If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels 

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit 

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher 

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 credits at Distinction and 27 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3. Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A Level or equivalent study.

Additional Information:

Applicants should use the personal statement on their application to illustrate their abilities, aptitudes, skills, qualifications and experiences which might be taken into account as well as or instead of any of the formal qualifications listed below. It is University policy to recognise a wide variety of evidence, and potential applicants may wish to discuss this aspect of their application with the admission tutor or at to seek guidance at an open day.

Please note that there are no guarantees of entry to a police force post-completion of the BSc (Hons) Professional Policing. The recruitment process for joining police forces is separate and each police force specifies its own entry requirements. Applicants are asked to be aware that there are associated recruitment process(es) required when applying to a particular force, including passing medical and fitness tests, and background and security checks. Candidates must also undertake a series of assessments including National Recruitment processes and Force vetting, and applicants should consider this before applying to the programme.

 

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

N/A

Scholarships and Discounts

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

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Modules Overview 2019/20

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

AP0419 -

Effective Police Investigation (20 Credits)

You will examine the fundamental principles and practices underpinning a police investigation. Beginning with the legislation and powers governing the

recovery and use of investigative and potential evidential material, you will be equipped with the knowledge pertinent to the effective recovery of materials

and information. Building through the module, you will study the progressive stages of an investigation: from the knowledge and mind-set required to plan

and conduct an investigation, including investigative concepts and decision making models, through to developing and testing an investigative hypothesis,

ensuring all appropriate evidence gathering opportunities are explored and full disclosure completed. Learning when to involve other areas, you will

become familiar with the roles and knowledge available from other key actors involved in investigations, such as the CPS and forensic specialists,

ensuring that you have familiarity to support a thorough investigative and interview strategy.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Police Investigations: 1, 2 3, 4 and 5

More information

CR4005 -

Introduction to Criminology and Policing (20 Credits)

You will examine the role and responsibilities of the police constable, the structure and organisation of the wider police service. With a focus

on the delivery of a professional service, you will be introduced to key concepts and principles including 'policing by consent', community

engagement, public protection and crime prevention. Unpacking key concepts and theories in criminology you will study the relationship

between crime, offending and victimisation, 'vulnerability’, ‘harm’ and ‘risk’, all in the context of operational policing. The module moves on to

develop your knowledge and understanding of a number of contemporary themes in criminology and policing including; counter-terrorism

policing; the response policing role; the role and function of community policing and partnership working; and the importance of information

and intelligence to key areas of policing.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Understanding the Police Constable Role: 1, 2, 3, 4

Criminology and Crime Prevention: 1, 2, 3

Vulnerability and Risk: 1, 3, 4, 6

Public Protection: 2, 3

Counter Terrorism: 2, 6

Criminal Justice: 3, 6

Response Policing: 1, 2

Policing Communities: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Information and Intelligence: 1, 3

More information

CR4006 -

Evidence Based Policing (20 Credits)

On this module you will examine the professional concept of evidence based policing (EBP) and be able to explain ways in which EBP has

been used to better inform policing and the delivery of effective and efficient police services in local communities. The module introduces you

to problem-orientated approaches to policing and you will develop knowledge of problem-solving techniques and their application in practice.

Key threads running throughout the module are criminological approaches to study skills, effective academic writing, and primary and

secondary information and data gathering techniques. The aim is to encourage and foster your ability to engage in critical argument and

reflection, evaluate research publications informed by qualitative and quantitative data, and learn how to develop logical conclusions based on

sound and reliable evidence.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Evidence Based Policing: 1, 3, 5, 6

Problem Solving: 1, 2

Research Methods and Skills: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

More information

HR9400 -

Decision-making, Teamwork and Leadership in Policing (20 Credits)

This module is designed and developed through combining relevant management theories with course content specified in the College of Policing curriculum. The key learning objectives incorporate those noted in the latter and are to help your understanding on decision making process and its implications for frontline policing practices; to facilitate your appreciation on the functionality of teamwork and its contributions to the delivery of policing; and to improve your evaluation on the role of leadership in organising contemporary police services.

To complete the module learning activities, you will be guided in this regard to:

• explore the key factors underlying decision-making process and identify the main barriers to effective leadership behaviour and team working experiences, including skills in reading circumstances, bias and the role of risk

• consider the role of autonomy and discretion in contemporary policing and the necessary measures put into place for ensuring that personal discretion is applied ethically and professionally

• investigate the links between the Police Code of Ethics and the decision-making process, particularly the skilful use of the National Decision Model (NDM).

• examine the importance of recording and reviewing of decisions in a team environment, with an aim for continual improvement and performance enhancement grounded in evidences

• evaluate the role and functioning of leadership in various challenging contexts, and appreciate the key qualities and personal characteristics of a good leader

The module will introduce and critically review a range of policing incidents involving decision-making, team work and leadership


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Decision Making and Discretion: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

More information

KV4002 -

Introduction to Digital Crime Investigations (20 Credits)

You will be given a rounded introduction to the principles of digital crimes and digital forensics from both a theoretical and technical perspective provided in contextual setting for digital forensics by an examination of the criminal justice system within England and Wales. You will be introduced to the basic philosophy and concepts of digital forensics, in particular the role of digital evidence and the basic techniques associated with gathering, preserving and presenting digital evidence. You will be guided in developing a critical and analytical approach to problem solving, the application of computer fundamentals and principles to digital evidence, an examination of the consequences of actions, the need to protect evidential integrity, and the need to document all actions. You will also be provided with an introduction to the particular legal, professional and ethical issues likely to face digital forensic examinations, such as legal requirements in the gathering, preservation and presentation of digital evidence so that it will be admissible in a court of law.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Digital Policing: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

More information

LW4022 -

Criminal Law and Procedure (20 Credits)

This module will introduce students to the criminal law and criminal justice system and processes, including how police powers are to be used ethically and professionally. This will include gaining an understanding of relevant legislation and guidance associated with different forms of policing. The module will introduce students specifically to:

• the criminal justice system and key legislation and processes including court processes and processes for gathering and managing information for investigations and different types of evidence. This includes the provision of materials and disclosure to the CPS.
• the Office of Constable and the absence of ordinary employment law. Comparing professional standards requirements within the police service to similar professional organisations. Explain the professional standards to be maintained including the level of professional standards required in both professional and personal life. Potential impact of policing targets on professional standards. Potential consequences of failing to comply with strict professional standards.
• the core principles of ethics, equality, diversity and human rights in professional policing. Understanding how to exercise police power and procedures fairly and without bias.
• The necessity for maintaining professional standards in policing, relevant governance, roles and responsibilities. Professional standards – disciplinary procedures and codes of ethics.
• Providing a professional and ethical service to individuals at risk and vulnerable. How to support vulnerable individuals and the ethical recording of policing incidents.
• Relevant legislation/guidance underpinning information and intelligence gathering by police. How other agencies information and intelligence can assist police operations. Data protection regulations and data management protocols. Individual rights to police information.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Maintaining Professional Standards: 1, 2, 3

More information

CR5010 -

Crime, Offenders and Victims (20 Credits)

The sociological and criminological causes of crime are introduced in this module and their implications considered in terms of police practice,

crime prevention and criminal justice. Vulnerability and victimisation are critically assessed, and the social harms of crime identified. The

module also considers those at risk of onset of offending (including volume crime, and links to serious and organised crime), and the potential

impact of early interventions from police and other agencies, e.g. MAPPA. Offender management and rehabilitation practices, including those

were police work in partnership with other agencies, are analysed. Similarly the social, cultural and economic factors that shape victimisation

and vulnerability are considered, and their implications for policing responses assessed. Once those 'at risk' of offending and victimisation are

identified in broad terms the module will consider crime prevention theories and strategies and different policing models that might promote

prevention.

The importance of police engagement with communities - acting with legitimacy in accordance with principles of procedural justice - are

critically reviewed in relation to conducting effective criminal investigation, gathering intelligence, and providing public reassurance.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Criminology and Crime Prevention: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Vulnerability and Risk: 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Public Protection: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Criminal Justice: 9, 10

Response Policing: 8, 9

Policing Communities: 6, 7, 8, 9

Police Investigations: 6, 7

More information

CR5011 -

Professional Standards and Police Integrity (20 Credits)

This module will allow you to evaluate the importance of ethics and values in the delivery of policing, and the impact that this can have among diverse

communities. The importance of police officers demonstrating fairness, ethics and integrity are outlined in relation to police legitimacy, public confidence

and operational effectiveness.

The module will critically assess how police organisations and individual officers and staff are held to account, by external and internal means, and how

previous examples of misconduct and malpractice can provide learning opportunities for future conduct. Accountability is considered in formal and informal

terms at the level of individuals, organisational culture, and the strategic role of police in society. The nature, development and role of professional

standards, in broad terms, is critically reviewed.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 2, 3, 4

Maintaining Professional Standards: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

More information

CR5012 -

Research Methods for Policing (20 Credits)

In this module you will learn how the development of research and scientific analysis can develop Evidence Based Policing and the benefits

and limitations associated with this. You will learn how to conduct systematic literature reviews and critically evaluate available evidence.

Quantitative and qualitative research techniques are introduced, including survey design and implementation, research interviews, data

analysis, sampling, and data processing. Practical matters relating to the conduct of research are addressed in terms of planning and

selecting different methodologies for specific types of research question, the ethics of research and presentation of data.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Evidence Based Policing: 2, 4, 7

Research Methods and Skills: 1, 2, 10, 11, 12

More information

CR5018 -

Evidence Based Policing: Practices and Pitfalls (20 Credits)

In this module you will learn how evidence and scientific analysis can be applied to contemporary policing. Constraints and limitations of research into policing are analysed, as well as successful contributions, in order that you will develop a rounded critical perspective. The ‘what works’ approach to policing and criminal justice is explored and you will understand how different methodologies can be applied to particular challenges. You will learn how to conduct systematic literature reviews and critically evaluate available evidence. Transferring evidence into policing practice is a challenge and the module assessment will help you understand these problems and to develop effective strategies to apply research findings in practice.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Evidence Based Policing: 2, 4, 7

More information

KV5004 -

Digital Forensics: Principles and Practices (20 Credits)

You will have the opportunity to further develop your analytical and evaluative skills in digital forensic investigations using the latest industry software, giving invaluable hands-on practical use. Learning and teaching will take place through a variety of mechanisms. Topics will be introduced in lectures and discussed through seminar activities and guided learning activities. The theoretical material on digital forensics will be re-enforced through the critical analysis and discussion of case studies as well as sessions on the use of digital forensics software in lab-based practical seminar sessions. These hands will use digital forensic tools to analyse and evaluate case studies/digital evidence to solve digital forensic problems. Throughout the lab-based sessions, you will be reminded of the professional responsibilities, the need to protect evidential integrity and the need to document all activities to a standard expected by a court of law.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Digital Policing: 6, 7

More information

LW5023 -

Public Law and Policing (20 Credits)

This module will introduce students to the extent of police powers in England and Wales, and how these powers are regulated and governed. This will include gaining an understanding of relevant legislation and guidance associated with different forms of policing, as well as the governing bodies and external agencies that ‘regulate’ policing in England and Wales. The module will introduce students to:

• Definitions, legislation and guidance associated with ‘public protection policing’.
• Key counter-terrorism terminology/ concepts as well as key anti-terror legislation and the functions of counter-terrorism policing.
• Legislation relevant to public order policing.
• Core policing functions and strategies relating to policing the roads. Most common offences and legislation used (incl. commercial vehicle enforcement). Legislation relevant to road investigations. Effects of road-related anti-social behaviour and offences.
• Lawful search/entry/ seizure procedures as well as police stop and search powers and the lawful arrest and detention of suspects.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Understanding the Police Constable Role: 5, 6
Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 1
Public Protection: 1
Counter Terrorism: 1, 3, 4, 5
Criminal Justice: 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8
Response Policing: 3, 4, 5
Policing the Roads: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Information and Intelligence: 2, 4, 5, 6 7

More information

CR6001 -

Concepts and Patterns of Organised Crime (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce and critically explore the manifestation of organised criminal activities that have embedded themselves within an increasingly globalised political economy, whilst not ignoring the essentially localised functions of indigenous enterprise crime. In order to explore the concepts and patterns of organised crime an inter-disciplinary social scientific approach will be adopted that critically evaluates the historical, criminological and sociological approaches upon the assessment of organised criminal activities.

More information

CR6004 -

Crimes of the Powerful (Optional,20 Credits)

Crime just doesn’t happen on the streets. It takes place in homes, in offices, in natural habitats – places hidden from view and scrutiny. Often it is kept hidden because of powerful actors. You will examine a range of criminal and harmful behaviours, as well as deviant and anti-social activities under the organising theme ‘crimes of the powerful’. The module situates and understands crimes and victimisations within a framework where questions of structural relationships and personal power in society are key to why some crime is visible and some is not. You will be expected to challenge orthodox representations of crime and demonstrate an intellectual openness to new ideas, whilst adopting a critical and analytical approach to the control, regulation and prevention of invisible and hidden crimes and/or victimisations.

More information

CR6005 -

Doing Time: The Prison Experience (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will get the opportunity to address a range of issues and ethical dilemmas that derive from the 'real world' of applied methods and strategies of penal intervention. Considerations of class, gender and ethnicity constitute key aspects of the conceptual framework and the principles of 'security, control and justice' are critically examined in the operational context.

The module will encourage you to pay particular attention to the diversity of experience, response and adaptation of those subjected to the varied sanctions within the penal system. Power imbalance and the relationships of authority, discipline and coercion are central issues within the overall perspective. Important areas included for discussion and debate are: young people, foreign national and ethnic minority prisoners, life-sentence prisoners; the treatment of vulnerable prisoners and mentally disordered offenders in penal and other 'controlling' institutions. Human Rights legislation in the prison context will also be critically analysed

.

The lecture programme will introduce you to topics and the seminars will provide opportunities to take forward discussion in depth. Assessment is by a 4,000 word project which is based upon a particular type of prison (100%). You will be able to choose from a number of different types of prisons and to demonstrate how their chosen prison type reflects on the wider question of the relationship between the prison and the prisoner experience.

More information

CR6007 -

Mentally Disordered Offenders (Optional,20 Credits)

Mentally disordered offenders: “mad, bad and dangerous to know”? During this module you will begin to explore who ‘they’ are, what ‘they’ do, why we are afraid of ‘them’, how we identify ‘them’ and what we are doing about ‘them’.
You will learn about and critique mentally disordered offender theory and practice, including: developing a critical understanding to the concept of ‘mentally disordered offenders’; the links between mental disorder and crime; the links between the mass media and the public in the development of the concept of the ‘dangerous offender’; the development of Forensic Psychiatry and its impact on the concept of ‘risk’ and ‘risk assessment’; and a critical assessment of the impact of policy developments on approaches to the care and/or control of mentally disordered offenders.

More information

CR6008 -

Restoration, Rehabilitation and Desistance (Optional,20 Credits)

Do children who break the law always turn into adult offenders? What might help someone change their behaviour? Is it always the impact of a criminal justice intervention that makes someone desist from crime? This module will look at all of these questions.

The first part will track the nature and complexity of criminal careers. It will demonstrate different ways in which offenders come to be engaged in crime and the extent to which starting early is a predictor of a criminal career. After considering the different ways in which criminal careers are sustained and developed, you will look at the interventions criminal justice and aligned organisations put in place to change offenders’ behaviour.

We will investigate forms of restorative justice and reparation, and question whether, and how, they might fit within different criminal justice systems around the world. For example, what might the role of ‘circles of support’ be in a risk adverse society? The module will also look at whether some activities in prison might have a role in desistance after release. For example are creative, artistic, spiritual and sporting activities a hook for changing offending behaviour after release?

Throughout the module we will consider UK and international criminal justice practice, and question the impact of social, political and cultural contexts of restoration, rehabilitation and desistance. You will be encouraged to explore all of these elements from cultural and critical criminological perspectives.

More information

CR6011 -

Violence and Society (Optional,20 Credits)

This module looks at three distinct but inter-related aspects of violence: structural violence, symbolic violence and subjective violence. Analyses of structural violence looks principally at the violence of systems. It is the unseen violence that occurs every day; the violence that needs to take place so that contemporary western consumer societies to continue onwards in their present form. Analyses of symbolic violence focus on the violence of language and symbols. Bourdieu’s account of symbolic violence, for example, addresses the ability of the powerful to deny the working class a language that might allow them to understand their true value and social position. Analyses of subjective violence focus on forms of violence committed by clearly identifiable ‘subjects’, or individuals. In this module, we will use psychoanalytic theory to identify the fundamental forces that drive the violent individual to inflict harm upon others.

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CR6012 -

Dissertation (40 Credits)

This will meet the following learning outcomes:

The module provides an opportunity for students to independently pursue a self-selected research project on a topic related to professional

policing. Students will: identify, understand, and interpret information about their chosen topic; organise that information in order to arrive at

and answer a focused research question; and make appropriate use of theory and methodology. On successful completion of the module, the

students will be able to demonstrate the following in relation to a particular topic: an extensive knowledge; awareness and understanding of

the range of information; an ability to arrive at a grounded and focused research question; a capacity for structured and analytical argument in

a written form; an aptitude for the use of theory and methodology; and an understanding of the ethical considerations of conducting research.

Independent learning is supported by a series of workshops in Semester 1, and supervisory tutorials across Semester 1 and Semester 2.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Problem Solving: 3, 4

Research Methods and Skills: 13

More information

CR6013 -

Professional Police Practice in Context (20 Credits)

The module will explore the contemporary police officer role in terms of the overall strategic context of policing and relevant national strategies

(such as Policing Vision 2025) as applied in the context of complex policing challenges. The nature of ‘professional practice’ in current

debates is considered. The module will encourage students to consider how to deliver effective policing outcomes in relation to diverse (and

sometimes contradictory) stakeholder groups with different social, political and strategic demands. Meeting community demand might be an

effective outcome, but might be in tension with providing for, for example, victim and witness care. Strategies (such as EBP and transparent

decision-making) that might enhance police legitimacy are explored as methods to provide for professional policing. The role of the College of

Policing, HMICFRS, the Home Office, National Police Chief's Council and the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners in shaping

strategic priorities for policing is explored.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Understanding the Police Constable Role 7, 8, 9

Response Policing: 11 12, 13

Policing Communities: 10

Police Investigations: 9

Vulnerability and Risk: 2

More information

CR6019 -

Work Experience Dissertation (40 Credits)

The module provides an opportunity for you to independently pursue your own piece of research based on work experience with an agency or organisation such as a police force, prison, youth offending team or voluntary sector organisation. You can also gain experience of research by working with a member of academic staff. With the support of a dissertation supervisor, you will seek to answer a research question either by collecting your own data, using existing data sets or by engaging in an analysis of the research literature. Your chosen topic will be linked to your work experience, which should last normally 80 hours. You will draw on and develop your research skills and on completion of the module you will be able to demonstrate the following: an extensive knowledge on your chosen dissertation topic, successful execution of a research project, the ability to set and explore a focused research question, the capacity to develop a structured and analytical argument; an aptitude for the application of theory and methodology; and an understanding of the ethical considerations of conducting your own research.

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HR9610 -

Critical Organizational Analysis (Optional,20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to encourage engagement with Organisation Theory through offering a comprehensive account of ideas, perspectives and practices of organisation. You will learn to analyse organisations, people and organising practices through critical employment of Organisation Theory which challenges conventional understanding of organisations. You will learn to explore the impact of recent trends in Organisation Theory and Practice on people and their behaviour in organisations.

The module links topics on Organisation Theory and Practice:
• Introduction to Organisation Theory, and implications for practice: overview of three main perspectives (Modern, Symbolic and Contemporary)
• Organisation Theory:
o Theorizing relationship between Organisation and its environment
o Theorizing different perspectives on Culture and Organisation, and managing across cultures
o Theorizing organisational (physical and social) structure
o Theorizing power, control and conflict (including the feminist perspective)
o Theorizing Identity and organisational behaviour
• Applications in practice:
o Organisational Design, Sustainable Organisational Design
o Organisational learning, tacit knowledge and knowledge management
o Organisational change, change management, and sustainable development
o Aesthetics and organisations, performance, narrative, theatre and organisation
o Managing culture, people and behaviour in organisations, and managing across cultures

Upon completion of the module you will gain an in-depth understanding of:

o The major perspectives on Organisation Theory
o ‘Critical’ organisation theory and management practices
o The recent trends in organising practices
o Theory and practices involved in working in multi-cultural organisations with an awareness of ethical considerations.
o How to form your own construction of knowledge on organisations, managing people and their behaviour

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KV6005 -

Advanced Digital Forensics (20 Credits)

You will develop your technical skills to a more advanced level. You will focus on researching issues relating to the advanced forensic examination and analysis of the current challenges within the digital forensic area. In addition, you will have to ascertain how guidelines and practice concerned with the integrity of digital evidence in the securing, recovering and analysing of that evidence can be maintained. Finally the ethical issues and professional requirements highlighted through your research will be explored and critically evaluated.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Police Investigations: 11

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LW6012 -

Family Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the range of laws, case law and practice developed in England and Wales to deal with matters arising from the breakdown of family relationships, including divorce, dissolution of a civil partnership, financial relief remedies, child maintenance, children, domestic abuse and cohabitees.
These areas will involve a range of activities including : reading, interpreting and applying statute and case law to practical scenarios, drafting court documents and developing writing skills in essay style questions.

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LW6014 -

Introduction to Comparative and International Criminal Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop critical understanding of substantive criminal law of the major legal systems of the world. You will learn different methods and techniques of comparative law and its significance to the development of domestic criminal law as well as to the work of the International Criminal Tribunals, namely, the International Criminal Court (ICC), the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. The module will take a critical look at the elements of crimes, individual criminal responsibility, and modes of participation from comparative and international criminal law perspectives.

This module covers the following topics:

• Introduction to Comparative Criminal Law;
• Comparative Analysis of Mens Rea Standards in Common Legal Systems, Romano/Germanic Legal Systems, Islamic Legal Traditions and International Criminal Law
• Comparative Analysis of Different Modes of Participation in Criminal Offences with Particular Focus on Joint Criminal Enterprise in Common Law Systems and Co-Perpetration & the Control Over the Crime Theory in German Criminal Law and their Application by International Criminal Courts and Tribunals
• Elements of International Crimes, i.e. Genocide and Crimes against Humanity
• General Principles of Law in the Jurisprudence of the ICTY, ICTR and ICC: Examining the Relevant Case Law of these Tribunals and the Techniques adopted by International Judges in their Search of General Principles of Law Derived from National Legal Systems of the World

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LW6025 -

Sports Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the theory, law and practice of sports law in England and Wales (including EU law and the World Anti-Doping Code). The module builds on knowledge gathered in the compulsory subjects of Contract, EU law, Criminal Law and Tort but also introduces students to other legal disciplines such as Employment Law. You will study the role of consent as a defence to what would otherwise be criminal liability for injuries incurred in the context of contact sports (such as football, ice hockey and rugby) and combat sports. You will study the causes and implications of the major 20th century sports stadium disasters including Valley Parade and Hillsborough. You will learn about the law applicable to football hooligans and consider the compatibility of some of these measures with the Human Rights Act. You will study the civil liability of (i) sports participants to each other and (ii) match officials, sports club owners, event organisers and governing bodies to sports participants, spectators and people living in close proximity to sports venues, which will engage your knowledge of negligence, nuisance and occupiers’ liability. You will examine the impact of EU Law on sport (in particular the right of free movement of workers in football and challenges to nationality quotas), the role of the Equality Act 2010 in tackling discrimination in sport, and the legal implications of doping in sport. Although the module has a UK focus it has a global scope and reference will be made to important developments overseas.

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LW6049 -

Advanced Criminal Procedure (20 Credits)

This module will look in depth at different types of policing including roads policing, the policing of major incidents and complex investigations. It will include:

MAJOR INCIDENTS: Explain the role and responsibilities of the police at a major incident including the differences between a critical incident and a major incident and who can declare a major incident and the command structure. It will analyse the role of the police within a joint emergency services operation including examining the effectiveness of joint interoperability between the emergency services, JESIP principles and the role of police at an incident.

ROADS POLICING: Explain how to apply a problem-solving process to investigate small-scale incidents and collisions on the roads. Understand the more prevalent criminal activity facilitated by the road network. Methods of gathering intelligence and information including stopping a vehicle, and follow up actions. Reviewing prevention and disruption options available, to target criminal activity on the road network: understand the impact of organised crime activity and how criminal activity on the road can be targeted. Understand the roles and responsibilities of personnel involved in police pursuits, and common causes of road collisions and how they can be reduced. Review the evidence base associated with serious road policing offences, and strategies associated with reducing the number of collisions.

COMPLEX INVESTIGATIONS: Review the roles and processes associated with conducting complex investigations including relevant legislation and community considerations. Understanding the role of internal specialists and additional investigative processes that may be required e.g. inquest and coroners. Explain additional professional considerations to be taken into account in relation to specific complex investigations and specific legislation applicable.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Policing the Roads: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Police Investigations: 8, 10
Response Policing: 6, 7, 10

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Modules Overview 2020/21

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

AP0419 -

Effective Police Investigation (20 Credits)

You will examine the fundamental principles and practices underpinning a police investigation. Beginning with the legislation and powers governing the

recovery and use of investigative and potential evidential material, you will be equipped with the knowledge pertinent to the effective recovery of materials

and information. Building through the module, you will study the progressive stages of an investigation: from the knowledge and mind-set required to plan

and conduct an investigation, including investigative concepts and decision making models, through to developing and testing an investigative hypothesis,

ensuring all appropriate evidence gathering opportunities are explored and full disclosure completed. Learning when to involve other areas, you will

become familiar with the roles and knowledge available from other key actors involved in investigations, such as the CPS and forensic specialists,

ensuring that you have familiarity to support a thorough investigative and interview strategy.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Police Investigations: 1, 2 3, 4 and 5

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CR4005 -

Introduction to Criminology and Policing (20 Credits)

You will examine the role and responsibilities of the police constable, the structure and organisation of the wider police service. With a focus

on the delivery of a professional service, you will be introduced to key concepts and principles including 'policing by consent', community

engagement, public protection and crime prevention. Unpacking key concepts and theories in criminology you will study the relationship

between crime, offending and victimisation, 'vulnerability’, ‘harm’ and ‘risk’, all in the context of operational policing. The module moves on to

develop your knowledge and understanding of a number of contemporary themes in criminology and policing including; counter-terrorism

policing; the response policing role; the role and function of community policing and partnership working; and the importance of information

and intelligence to key areas of policing.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Understanding the Police Constable Role: 1, 2, 3, 4

Criminology and Crime Prevention: 1, 2, 3

Vulnerability and Risk: 1, 3, 4, 6

Public Protection: 2, 3

Counter Terrorism: 2, 6

Criminal Justice: 3, 6

Response Policing: 1, 2

Policing Communities: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Information and Intelligence: 1, 3

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CR4006 -

Evidence Based Policing (20 Credits)

On this module you will examine the professional concept of evidence based policing (EBP) and be able to explain ways in which EBP has

been used to better inform policing and the delivery of effective and efficient police services in local communities. The module introduces you

to problem-orientated approaches to policing and you will develop knowledge of problem-solving techniques and their application in practice.

Key threads running throughout the module are criminological approaches to study skills, effective academic writing, and primary and

secondary information and data gathering techniques. The aim is to encourage and foster your ability to engage in critical argument and

reflection, evaluate research publications informed by qualitative and quantitative data, and learn how to develop logical conclusions based on

sound and reliable evidence.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Evidence Based Policing: 1, 3, 5, 6

Problem Solving: 1, 2

Research Methods and Skills: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

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HR9400 -

Decision-making, Teamwork and Leadership in Policing (20 Credits)

This module is designed and developed through combining relevant management theories with course content specified in the College of Policing curriculum. The key learning objectives incorporate those noted in the latter and are to help your understanding on decision making process and its implications for frontline policing practices; to facilitate your appreciation on the functionality of teamwork and its contributions to the delivery of policing; and to improve your evaluation on the role of leadership in organising contemporary police services.

To complete the module learning activities, you will be guided in this regard to:

• explore the key factors underlying decision-making process and identify the main barriers to effective leadership behaviour and team working experiences, including skills in reading circumstances, bias and the role of risk

• consider the role of autonomy and discretion in contemporary policing and the necessary measures put into place for ensuring that personal discretion is applied ethically and professionally

• investigate the links between the Police Code of Ethics and the decision-making process, particularly the skilful use of the National Decision Model (NDM).

• examine the importance of recording and reviewing of decisions in a team environment, with an aim for continual improvement and performance enhancement grounded in evidences

• evaluate the role and functioning of leadership in various challenging contexts, and appreciate the key qualities and personal characteristics of a good leader

The module will introduce and critically review a range of policing incidents involving decision-making, team work and leadership


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Decision Making and Discretion: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11

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KV4002 -

Introduction to Digital Crime Investigations (20 Credits)

You will be given a rounded introduction to the principles of digital crimes and digital forensics from both a theoretical and technical perspective provided in contextual setting for digital forensics by an examination of the criminal justice system within England and Wales. You will be introduced to the basic philosophy and concepts of digital forensics, in particular the role of digital evidence and the basic techniques associated with gathering, preserving and presenting digital evidence. You will be guided in developing a critical and analytical approach to problem solving, the application of computer fundamentals and principles to digital evidence, an examination of the consequences of actions, the need to protect evidential integrity, and the need to document all actions. You will also be provided with an introduction to the particular legal, professional and ethical issues likely to face digital forensic examinations, such as legal requirements in the gathering, preservation and presentation of digital evidence so that it will be admissible in a court of law.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Digital Policing: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

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LW4022 -

Criminal Law and Procedure (20 Credits)

This module will introduce students to the criminal law and criminal justice system and processes, including how police powers are to be used ethically and professionally. This will include gaining an understanding of relevant legislation and guidance associated with different forms of policing. The module will introduce students specifically to:

• the criminal justice system and key legislation and processes including court processes and processes for gathering and managing information for investigations and different types of evidence. This includes the provision of materials and disclosure to the CPS.
• the Office of Constable and the absence of ordinary employment law. Comparing professional standards requirements within the police service to similar professional organisations. Explain the professional standards to be maintained including the level of professional standards required in both professional and personal life. Potential impact of policing targets on professional standards. Potential consequences of failing to comply with strict professional standards.
• the core principles of ethics, equality, diversity and human rights in professional policing. Understanding how to exercise police power and procedures fairly and without bias.
• The necessity for maintaining professional standards in policing, relevant governance, roles and responsibilities. Professional standards – disciplinary procedures and codes of ethics.
• Providing a professional and ethical service to individuals at risk and vulnerable. How to support vulnerable individuals and the ethical recording of policing incidents.
• Relevant legislation/guidance underpinning information and intelligence gathering by police. How other agencies information and intelligence can assist police operations. Data protection regulations and data management protocols. Individual rights to police information.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Maintaining Professional Standards: 1, 2, 3

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CR5010 -

Crime, Offenders and Victims (20 Credits)

The sociological and criminological causes of crime are introduced in this module and their implications considered in terms of police practice,

crime prevention and criminal justice. Vulnerability and victimisation are critically assessed, and the social harms of crime identified. The

module also considers those at risk of onset of offending (including volume crime, and links to serious and organised crime), and the potential

impact of early interventions from police and other agencies, e.g. MAPPA. Offender management and rehabilitation practices, including those

were police work in partnership with other agencies, are analysed. Similarly the social, cultural and economic factors that shape victimisation

and vulnerability are considered, and their implications for policing responses assessed. Once those 'at risk' of offending and victimisation are

identified in broad terms the module will consider crime prevention theories and strategies and different policing models that might promote

prevention.

The importance of police engagement with communities - acting with legitimacy in accordance with principles of procedural justice - are

critically reviewed in relation to conducting effective criminal investigation, gathering intelligence, and providing public reassurance.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Criminology and Crime Prevention: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Vulnerability and Risk: 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

Public Protection: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

Criminal Justice: 9, 10

Response Policing: 8, 9

Policing Communities: 6, 7, 8, 9

Police Investigations: 6, 7

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CR5011 -

Professional Standards and Police Integrity (20 Credits)

This module will allow you to evaluate the importance of ethics and values in the delivery of policing, and the impact that this can have among diverse

communities. The importance of police officers demonstrating fairness, ethics and integrity are outlined in relation to police legitimacy, public confidence

and operational effectiveness.

The module will critically assess how police organisations and individual officers and staff are held to account, by external and internal means, and how

previous examples of misconduct and malpractice can provide learning opportunities for future conduct. Accountability is considered in formal and informal

terms at the level of individuals, organisational culture, and the strategic role of police in society. The nature, development and role of professional

standards, in broad terms, is critically reviewed.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 2, 3, 4

Maintaining Professional Standards: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

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CR5012 -

Research Methods for Policing (20 Credits)

In this module you will learn how the development of research and scientific analysis can develop Evidence Based Policing and the benefits

and limitations associated with this. You will learn how to conduct systematic literature reviews and critically evaluate available evidence.

Quantitative and qualitative research techniques are introduced, including survey design and implementation, research interviews, data

analysis, sampling, and data processing. Practical matters relating to the conduct of research are addressed in terms of planning and

selecting different methodologies for specific types of research question, the ethics of research and presentation of data.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Evidence Based Policing: 2, 4, 7

Research Methods and Skills: 1, 2, 10, 11, 12

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CR5018 -

Evidence Based Policing: Practices and Pitfalls (20 Credits)

In this module you will learn how evidence and scientific analysis can be applied to contemporary policing. Constraints and limitations of research into policing are analysed, as well as successful contributions, in order that you will develop a rounded critical perspective. The ‘what works’ approach to policing and criminal justice is explored and you will understand how different methodologies can be applied to particular challenges. You will learn how to conduct systematic literature reviews and critically evaluate available evidence. Transferring evidence into policing practice is a challenge and the module assessment will help you understand these problems and to develop effective strategies to apply research findings in practice.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Evidence Based Policing: 2, 4, 7

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KV5004 -

Digital Forensics: Principles and Practices (20 Credits)

You will have the opportunity to further develop your analytical and evaluative skills in digital forensic investigations using the latest industry software, giving invaluable hands-on practical use. Learning and teaching will take place through a variety of mechanisms. Topics will be introduced in lectures and discussed through seminar activities and guided learning activities. The theoretical material on digital forensics will be re-enforced through the critical analysis and discussion of case studies as well as sessions on the use of digital forensics software in lab-based practical seminar sessions. These hands will use digital forensic tools to analyse and evaluate case studies/digital evidence to solve digital forensic problems. Throughout the lab-based sessions, you will be reminded of the professional responsibilities, the need to protect evidential integrity and the need to document all activities to a standard expected by a court of law.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Digital Policing: 6, 7

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LW5023 -

Public Law and Policing (20 Credits)

This module will introduce students to the extent of police powers in England and Wales, and how these powers are regulated and governed. This will include gaining an understanding of relevant legislation and guidance associated with different forms of policing, as well as the governing bodies and external agencies that ‘regulate’ policing in England and Wales. The module will introduce students to:

• Definitions, legislation and guidance associated with ‘public protection policing’.
• Key counter-terrorism terminology/ concepts as well as key anti-terror legislation and the functions of counter-terrorism policing.
• Legislation relevant to public order policing.
• Core policing functions and strategies relating to policing the roads. Most common offences and legislation used (incl. commercial vehicle enforcement). Legislation relevant to road investigations. Effects of road-related anti-social behaviour and offences.
• Lawful search/entry/ seizure procedures as well as police stop and search powers and the lawful arrest and detention of suspects.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Understanding the Police Constable Role: 5, 6
Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 1
Public Protection: 1
Counter Terrorism: 1, 3, 4, 5
Criminal Justice: 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8
Response Policing: 3, 4, 5
Policing the Roads: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Information and Intelligence: 2, 4, 5, 6 7

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CR6001 -

Concepts and Patterns of Organised Crime (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce and critically explore the manifestation of organised criminal activities that have embedded themselves within an increasingly globalised political economy, whilst not ignoring the essentially localised functions of indigenous enterprise crime. In order to explore the concepts and patterns of organised crime an inter-disciplinary social scientific approach will be adopted that critically evaluates the historical, criminological and sociological approaches upon the assessment of organised criminal activities.

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CR6004 -

Crimes of the Powerful (Optional,20 Credits)

Crime just doesn’t happen on the streets. It takes place in homes, in offices, in natural habitats – places hidden from view and scrutiny. Often it is kept hidden because of powerful actors. You will examine a range of criminal and harmful behaviours, as well as deviant and anti-social activities under the organising theme ‘crimes of the powerful’. The module situates and understands crimes and victimisations within a framework where questions of structural relationships and personal power in society are key to why some crime is visible and some is not. You will be expected to challenge orthodox representations of crime and demonstrate an intellectual openness to new ideas, whilst adopting a critical and analytical approach to the control, regulation and prevention of invisible and hidden crimes and/or victimisations.

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CR6005 -

Doing Time: The Prison Experience (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will get the opportunity to address a range of issues and ethical dilemmas that derive from the 'real world' of applied methods and strategies of penal intervention. Considerations of class, gender and ethnicity constitute key aspects of the conceptual framework and the principles of 'security, control and justice' are critically examined in the operational context.

The module will encourage you to pay particular attention to the diversity of experience, response and adaptation of those subjected to the varied sanctions within the penal system. Power imbalance and the relationships of authority, discipline and coercion are central issues within the overall perspective. Important areas included for discussion and debate are: young people, foreign national and ethnic minority prisoners, life-sentence prisoners; the treatment of vulnerable prisoners and mentally disordered offenders in penal and other 'controlling' institutions. Human Rights legislation in the prison context will also be critically analysed

.

The lecture programme will introduce you to topics and the seminars will provide opportunities to take forward discussion in depth. Assessment is by a 4,000 word project which is based upon a particular type of prison (100%). You will be able to choose from a number of different types of prisons and to demonstrate how their chosen prison type reflects on the wider question of the relationship between the prison and the prisoner experience.

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CR6007 -

Mentally Disordered Offenders (Optional,20 Credits)

Mentally disordered offenders: “mad, bad and dangerous to know”? During this module you will begin to explore who ‘they’ are, what ‘they’ do, why we are afraid of ‘them’, how we identify ‘them’ and what we are doing about ‘them’.
You will learn about and critique mentally disordered offender theory and practice, including: developing a critical understanding to the concept of ‘mentally disordered offenders’; the links between mental disorder and crime; the links between the mass media and the public in the development of the concept of the ‘dangerous offender’; the development of Forensic Psychiatry and its impact on the concept of ‘risk’ and ‘risk assessment’; and a critical assessment of the impact of policy developments on approaches to the care and/or control of mentally disordered offenders.

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CR6008 -

Restoration, Rehabilitation and Desistance (Optional,20 Credits)

Do children who break the law always turn into adult offenders? What might help someone change their behaviour? Is it always the impact of a criminal justice intervention that makes someone desist from crime? This module will look at all of these questions.

The first part will track the nature and complexity of criminal careers. It will demonstrate different ways in which offenders come to be engaged in crime and the extent to which starting early is a predictor of a criminal career. After considering the different ways in which criminal careers are sustained and developed, you will look at the interventions criminal justice and aligned organisations put in place to change offenders’ behaviour.

We will investigate forms of restorative justice and reparation, and question whether, and how, they might fit within different criminal justice systems around the world. For example, what might the role of ‘circles of support’ be in a risk adverse society? The module will also look at whether some activities in prison might have a role in desistance after release. For example are creative, artistic, spiritual and sporting activities a hook for changing offending behaviour after release?

Throughout the module we will consider UK and international criminal justice practice, and question the impact of social, political and cultural contexts of restoration, rehabilitation and desistance. You will be encouraged to explore all of these elements from cultural and critical criminological perspectives.

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CR6011 -

Violence and Society (Optional,20 Credits)

This module looks at three distinct but inter-related aspects of violence: structural violence, symbolic violence and subjective violence. Analyses of structural violence looks principally at the violence of systems. It is the unseen violence that occurs every day; the violence that needs to take place so that contemporary western consumer societies to continue onwards in their present form. Analyses of symbolic violence focus on the violence of language and symbols. Bourdieu’s account of symbolic violence, for example, addresses the ability of the powerful to deny the working class a language that might allow them to understand their true value and social position. Analyses of subjective violence focus on forms of violence committed by clearly identifiable ‘subjects’, or individuals. In this module, we will use psychoanalytic theory to identify the fundamental forces that drive the violent individual to inflict harm upon others.

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CR6012 -

Dissertation (40 Credits)

This will meet the following learning outcomes:

The module provides an opportunity for students to independently pursue a self-selected research project on a topic related to professional

policing. Students will: identify, understand, and interpret information about their chosen topic; organise that information in order to arrive at

and answer a focused research question; and make appropriate use of theory and methodology. On successful completion of the module, the

students will be able to demonstrate the following in relation to a particular topic: an extensive knowledge; awareness and understanding of

the range of information; an ability to arrive at a grounded and focused research question; a capacity for structured and analytical argument in

a written form; an aptitude for the use of theory and methodology; and an understanding of the ethical considerations of conducting research.

Independent learning is supported by a series of workshops in Semester 1, and supervisory tutorials across Semester 1 and Semester 2.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Problem Solving: 3, 4

Research Methods and Skills: 13

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CR6013 -

Professional Police Practice in Context (20 Credits)

The module will explore the contemporary police officer role in terms of the overall strategic context of policing and relevant national strategies

(such as Policing Vision 2025) as applied in the context of complex policing challenges. The nature of ‘professional practice’ in current

debates is considered. The module will encourage students to consider how to deliver effective policing outcomes in relation to diverse (and

sometimes contradictory) stakeholder groups with different social, political and strategic demands. Meeting community demand might be an

effective outcome, but might be in tension with providing for, for example, victim and witness care. Strategies (such as EBP and transparent

decision-making) that might enhance police legitimacy are explored as methods to provide for professional policing. The role of the College of

Policing, HMICFRS, the Home Office, National Police Chief's Council and the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners in shaping

strategic priorities for policing is explored.


CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:

Understanding the Police Constable Role 7, 8, 9

Response Policing: 11 12, 13

Policing Communities: 10

Police Investigations: 9

Vulnerability and Risk: 2

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CR6019 -

Work Experience Dissertation (40 Credits)

The module provides an opportunity for you to independently pursue your own piece of research based on work experience with an agency or organisation such as a police force, prison, youth offending team or voluntary sector organisation. You can also gain experience of research by working with a member of academic staff. With the support of a dissertation supervisor, you will seek to answer a research question either by collecting your own data, using existing data sets or by engaging in an analysis of the research literature. Your chosen topic will be linked to your work experience, which should last normally 80 hours. You will draw on and develop your research skills and on completion of the module you will be able to demonstrate the following: an extensive knowledge on your chosen dissertation topic, successful execution of a research project, the ability to set and explore a focused research question, the capacity to develop a structured and analytical argument; an aptitude for the application of theory and methodology; and an understanding of the ethical considerations of conducting your own research.

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HR9610 -

Critical Organizational Analysis (Optional,20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to encourage engagement with Organisation Theory through offering a comprehensive account of ideas, perspectives and practices of organisation. You will learn to analyse organisations, people and organising practices through critical employment of Organisation Theory which challenges conventional understanding of organisations. You will learn to explore the impact of recent trends in Organisation Theory and Practice on people and their behaviour in organisations.

The module links topics on Organisation Theory and Practice:
• Introduction to Organisation Theory, and implications for practice: overview of three main perspectives (Modern, Symbolic and Contemporary)
• Organisation Theory:
o Theorizing relationship between Organisation and its environment
o Theorizing different perspectives on Culture and Organisation, and managing across cultures
o Theorizing organisational (physical and social) structure
o Theorizing power, control and conflict (including the feminist perspective)
o Theorizing Identity and organisational behaviour
• Applications in practice:
o Organisational Design, Sustainable Organisational Design
o Organisational learning, tacit knowledge and knowledge management
o Organisational change, change management, and sustainable development
o Aesthetics and organisations, performance, narrative, theatre and organisation
o Managing culture, people and behaviour in organisations, and managing across cultures

Upon completion of the module you will gain an in-depth understanding of:

o The major perspectives on Organisation Theory
o ‘Critical’ organisation theory and management practices
o The recent trends in organising practices
o Theory and practices involved in working in multi-cultural organisations with an awareness of ethical considerations.
o How to form your own construction of knowledge on organisations, managing people and their behaviour

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KV6005 -

Advanced Digital Forensics (20 Credits)

You will develop your technical skills to a more advanced level. You will focus on researching issues relating to the advanced forensic examination and analysis of the current challenges within the digital forensic area. In addition, you will have to ascertain how guidelines and practice concerned with the integrity of digital evidence in the securing, recovering and analysing of that evidence can be maintained. Finally the ethical issues and professional requirements highlighted through your research will be explored and critically evaluated.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Police Investigations: 11

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LW6012 -

Family Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the range of laws, case law and practice developed in England and Wales to deal with matters arising from the breakdown of family relationships, including divorce, dissolution of a civil partnership, financial relief remedies, child maintenance, children, domestic abuse and cohabitees.
These areas will involve a range of activities including : reading, interpreting and applying statute and case law to practical scenarios, drafting court documents and developing writing skills in essay style questions.

More information

LW6014 -

Introduction to Comparative and International Criminal Law (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will develop critical understanding of substantive criminal law of the major legal systems of the world. You will learn different methods and techniques of comparative law and its significance to the development of domestic criminal law as well as to the work of the International Criminal Tribunals, namely, the International Criminal Court (ICC), the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. The module will take a critical look at the elements of crimes, individual criminal responsibility, and modes of participation from comparative and international criminal law perspectives.

This module covers the following topics:

• Introduction to Comparative Criminal Law;
• Comparative Analysis of Mens Rea Standards in Common Legal Systems, Romano/Germanic Legal Systems, Islamic Legal Traditions and International Criminal Law
• Comparative Analysis of Different Modes of Participation in Criminal Offences with Particular Focus on Joint Criminal Enterprise in Common Law Systems and Co-Perpetration & the Control Over the Crime Theory in German Criminal Law and their Application by International Criminal Courts and Tribunals
• Elements of International Crimes, i.e. Genocide and Crimes against Humanity
• General Principles of Law in the Jurisprudence of the ICTY, ICTR and ICC: Examining the Relevant Case Law of these Tribunals and the Techniques adopted by International Judges in their Search of General Principles of Law Derived from National Legal Systems of the World

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LW6025 -

Sports Law (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn about the theory, law and practice of sports law in England and Wales (including EU law and the World Anti-Doping Code). The module builds on knowledge gathered in the compulsory subjects of Contract, EU law, Criminal Law and Tort but also introduces students to other legal disciplines such as Employment Law. You will study the role of consent as a defence to what would otherwise be criminal liability for injuries incurred in the context of contact sports (such as football, ice hockey and rugby) and combat sports. You will study the causes and implications of the major 20th century sports stadium disasters including Valley Parade and Hillsborough. You will learn about the law applicable to football hooligans and consider the compatibility of some of these measures with the Human Rights Act. You will study the civil liability of (i) sports participants to each other and (ii) match officials, sports club owners, event organisers and governing bodies to sports participants, spectators and people living in close proximity to sports venues, which will engage your knowledge of negligence, nuisance and occupiers’ liability. You will examine the impact of EU Law on sport (in particular the right of free movement of workers in football and challenges to nationality quotas), the role of the Equality Act 2010 in tackling discrimination in sport, and the legal implications of doping in sport. Although the module has a UK focus it has a global scope and reference will be made to important developments overseas.

More information

LW6049 -

Advanced Criminal Procedure (20 Credits)

This module will look in depth at different types of policing including roads policing, the policing of major incidents and complex investigations. It will include:

MAJOR INCIDENTS: Explain the role and responsibilities of the police at a major incident including the differences between a critical incident and a major incident and who can declare a major incident and the command structure. It will analyse the role of the police within a joint emergency services operation including examining the effectiveness of joint interoperability between the emergency services, JESIP principles and the role of police at an incident.

ROADS POLICING: Explain how to apply a problem-solving process to investigate small-scale incidents and collisions on the roads. Understand the more prevalent criminal activity facilitated by the road network. Methods of gathering intelligence and information including stopping a vehicle, and follow up actions. Reviewing prevention and disruption options available, to target criminal activity on the road network: understand the impact of organised crime activity and how criminal activity on the road can be targeted. Understand the roles and responsibilities of personnel involved in police pursuits, and common causes of road collisions and how they can be reduced. Review the evidence base associated with serious road policing offences, and strategies associated with reducing the number of collisions.

COMPLEX INVESTIGATIONS: Review the roles and processes associated with conducting complex investigations including relevant legislation and community considerations. Understanding the role of internal specialists and additional investigative processes that may be required e.g. inquest and coroners. Explain additional professional considerations to be taken into account in relation to specific complex investigations and specific legislation applicable.

CoP pre-join curriculum learning outcomes:
Policing the Roads: 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Police Investigations: 8, 10
Response Policing: 6, 7, 10

More information

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

Professional Policing BSc (Hons)

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

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