Dr Nick Neave

Associate Professor and Lecturer
Department: Psychology

Dr Nick Neave is an Associate Professor within the Department of Psychology. He is Faculty Director of Ethics and Chair of the Faculty Research Ethics Committee.

Nick Neave Staffprofile Northumbriauniversity255Dr Nick Neave is an Associate Professor within the Department of Psychology. He is Faculty Director of Ethics and Chair of the Faculty Research Ethics Committee. He contributes to the teaching at Undergraduate level, acting as Module Tutor for 'Parapsychology', 'Evolutionary Psychology', and 'Hormones & Behaviour'. At Postgraduate level he teaches on modules associated with the M.Res, and delivers a Media Skills Training Course for Postgraduate Researchers.

Qualifications

PhD in Psychology

Research Themes and Scholarly Interests

His research interests include:
Human movement as an 'honest' cue to reproductive quality.
Personality factors associated with conspiracy belief, superstition and hoarding.
The physiology underlying the 'home advantage' in football.
Associations between prenatal testosterone exposure and adult behaviour/cognition

Sponsors and Collaborators

Long-term collaborator with Dr Bernhard Fink of Gottingen University.

Key Publications

Neave, N. (2008). Hormones and Behaviour: A Psychological Approach. Cambridge University Press.

Hugill, N., Fink, B., & Neave, N. (2010). The role of human body movements in mate selection. Evolutionary Psychology, 8: 66-89.

Neave, N., McCarty, K., Freynik, J., Caplan, N., Hönekopp, J., & Fink, B. (2011). Male dance moves that catch a woman's eye. Biology Letters, 7: 221-224.

Darwin, H., Neave, N., & Holmes, J. (2011). Belief in conspiracy theories. The role of paranormal belief, paranoid ideation and schizotypy. Personality and Individual Differences, 50: 1289-1293.

Fink, B., Weege, B., Flügge, J., Röder, S., Neave, N., & McCarty, K. (2012). Men's personality and women's perception of their dance quality. Personality and Individual Differences, 52: 232-235.

McCarty, K., Hönekopp, J., Neave, N., Caplan, N., & Fink, B. (2013). Male body movements as a possible cue to physical strength: A biomechanical analysis. American Journal of Human Biology, 25: 307-312.

To view my Northumbria Research Link page click here