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our research environment is rated 100% world leading

Support. Care. Empower.

Throughout the Health and Social Care degree, we aim to support you to explore, discuss and evaluate health and social care systems from a range of different perspectives.

You will research the history of health and social care provision, critically examine a range of professional roles, discuss the potential for service user involvement and analyse global health problems and government policy. In addition, you will debate a range of significant health and sociologically important topics such as disability; equality and social justice; mental health; and the social determinants of health.

This degree also aims to equip you with knowledge about some of the challenges and tensions of partnership and inter-professional working, involving service users, and why integration between health and social care might lead to higher standards of care.

Why study Health and Social Care at Northumbria?

The knowledge you will get from these health and social care courses in the uk will prepare you for potential roles in a variety of health and social care settings, such as working with people experiencing mental health issues, in Domestic Violence services, or in Public Health teams.  It will also prepare you for post-graduate and/or professional study in this health and social care related subjects.   

  • Top University - Social Work at Northumbria is ranked top 20 in the UK (Times Good University Guide, 2024)
  • A Research Powerhouse - Social Policy is ranked 3rd in the UK for research power in the UK out of 76 submissions (REF, 2021). This represents a rise of 15 places compared to 2014.
  • Student Rated - Over 93% of students studying Social Work at Northumbria felt free to express their ideas, opinions, and beliefs (NSS, 2023).

See other similar courses you may be interested in: BSc (Hons) Social Work

 

 

 

our research environment is rated 100% world leading

Support. Care. Empower.

Throughout the Health and Social Care degree, we aim to support you to explore, discuss and evaluate health and social care systems from a range of different perspectives.

You will research the history of health and social care provision, critically examine a range of professional roles, discuss the potential for service user involvement and analyse global health problems and government policy. In addition, you will debate a range of significant health and sociologically important topics such as disability; equality and social justice; mental health; and the social determinants of health.

This degree also aims to equip you with knowledge about some of the challenges and tensions of partnership and inter-professional working, involving service users, and why integration between health and social care might lead to higher standards of care.

Why study Health and Social Care at Northumbria?

The knowledge you will get from these health and social care courses in the uk will prepare you for potential roles in a variety of health and social care settings, such as working with people experiencing mental health issues, in Domestic Violence services, or in Public Health teams.  It will also prepare you for post-graduate and/or professional study in this health and social care related subjects.   

  • Top University - Social Work at Northumbria is ranked top 20 in the UK (Times Good University Guide, 2024)
  • A Research Powerhouse - Social Policy is ranked 3rd in the UK for research power in the UK out of 76 submissions (REF, 2021). This represents a rise of 15 places compared to 2014.
  • Student Rated - Over 93% of students studying Social Work at Northumbria felt free to express their ideas, opinions, and beliefs (NSS, 2023).

See other similar courses you may be interested in: BSc (Hons) Social Work

 

 

Course Information

UCAS Code
L5L6

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Social Work, Education and Community Wellbeing

Location
Coach Lane Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2024 or September 2025

Fee Information

Module Information

Department / Social Work, Education

Within this department, over half of our research in Social Work and Education has been rated as world leading or internationally excellent.

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Entry Requirements 2024/25

Standard Entry

112 UCAS Tariff points
From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A level, T Level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas or the International Baccalaureate

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Northumbria University is committed to supporting all individuals to achieve their ambitions. We have a range of schemes and alternative offers to make sure as many individuals as possible are given an opportunity to study at our University regardless of personal circumstances or background. To find out more, review our Northumbria Entry Requirement Essential Information page for further details www.northumbria.ac.uk/entryrequirementsinfo

Subject Requirements:
There are no specific subject requirements for this course

GCSE Requirements:
Students will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4 or C, or the equivalent.

Additional Requirements:
A suitable DBS Enhanced Certificate is required.

International Qualifications:
We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match those shown above. If you have taken qualifications outside the UK you can find out how your qualifications compare by visiting our country page www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:
International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Entry Requirements 2025/26

Standard Entry

112 UCAS Tariff points
From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A level, T Level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas or the International Baccalaureate

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Northumbria University is committed to supporting all individuals to achieve their ambitions. We have a range of schemes and alternative offers to make sure as many individuals as possible are given an opportunity to study at our University regardless of personal circumstances or background. To find out more, review our Northumbria Entry Requirement Essential Information page for further details www.northumbria.ac.uk/entryrequirementsinfo

Subject Requirements:
There are no specific subject requirements for this course

GCSE Requirements:
Students will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4 or C, or the equivalent.

Additional Requirements:
A suitable DBS Enhanced Certificate is required.

International Qualifications:
We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match those shown above. If you have taken qualifications outside the UK you can find out how your qualifications compare by visiting our country page www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:
International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2024/25 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1: £9,250

* The maximum tuition fee that we are permitted to charge for UK students is set by government. Tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, these are subject to government regulations and in line with inflation.


EU Fee in Year 1: £18,250

International Fee in Year 1: £18,250


Please see the main Funding Pages for 24/25 scholarship information.

 


ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Fees and Funding 2025/26 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1*: TBC

* The maximum tuition fee that we are permitted to charge for UK students is set by government. Tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, these are subject to government regulations and in line with inflation.



EU Fee in Year 1: **TBC


International Fee in Year 1: TBC

ADDITIONAL COSTS

TBC

If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

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How to Apply

Please use the Apply Now button at the top of this page to submit your application.

Certain applications may need to be submitted via an external application system, such as UCAS, Lawcabs or DfE Apply.

The Apply Now button will redirect you to the relevant website if this is the case.

You can find further application advice, such as what to include in your application and what happens after you apply, on our Admissions Hub Admissions | Northumbria University



Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

PP0425 -

Learning at University (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide formal academic induction across your whole first year of study, introducing you to the academic literacy practices required to perform successfully in higher education. The module will equip you to become effective, active, independent learners throughout the rest of your degree. It will enable you to recognise appropriate approaches to study in higher education and begin to develop the academic skills, qualities and competencies expected of students on the programme. The module has been designed to support you to recognise and debate key concepts of your degree by encouraging you to actively engage in discussion and debate to enable you to make-sense of the subject-curricula and discourse communities of the discipline area and to develop your own standpoint.
The module will illuminate how to use, at various points throughout the programme, the expertise and resources on offer in a range of formats via, for instance, the Northumbria Skills framework including Skills Plus.

More information

PP0428 -

Introduction to Academic Research (Core,20 Credits)

This module provides you with an introduction to academic research within health and social sciences disciplines. In an increasingly information-rich society, knowledge and skills in research play an essential role in enabling society to anticipate, and respond to, unexpected challenges and change. Therefore, understanding and using research are recognised as essential requirements for all professionals to inform service improvement. This module is designed to develop your understanding of the nature, purpose, principles, practical challenges and ethics of research by examining a broad range of research methodologies and methods. You will also learn essential concepts and languages in research.

The focus of the module is on specific and very important aspects of research for you:
• Understanding the role of research;
• Introduction to research methodologies and how these underpin different forms of knowledge;
• Introduction to research methods and their strengths and weaknesses;
• Reviewing and critiquing literature with methodological appropriateness and with particular reference to the application to practice;
• understanding the importance of the ethical issues in research;
• Application of knowledge to practice and putting research to use.

This module will support you to develop the research skills and knowledge necessary that are transferable across disciplines. This module will assist you in the conception, development, documentation, delivery and reporting of your independent research. The module is invaluable in providing you with a solid foundation from which to develop your independent research, including final year project.

More information

PP0431 -

Foundations of Health & Social Care Policy and Practice (Core,20 Credits)

Improvements in living standards and the introduction of new technologies have had a significant impact on life expectancy of both older people, who live longer than ever before, and younger people with disabilities, who are enjoying longer and a better quality of life. This module has been designed to allow you to consider ways in which health and social care can be conceptualised and experienced through a variety of different methodologies. These include, exploring levels of analysis and professional and lay perspectives on health and social care. The underpinning eclectic concepts of health and social care will be examined in an integrated way. In addition you will be encouraged to explore ethical issues in health and social care such as equity, choice, need, autonomy, freedom, rationing and justice.

More information

PP0432 -

Professional Practice and the Health & Social Care Workplace (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide an introduction and understanding of contemporary key issues in professional practice in Health and Social Care, and to enable you to relate the impact of various professions and their practice to the subject of Integrated Health and Social Care. It will enable you to make links between current research based evidence and social and health care policy and professionalism. Issues covered will include the changing nature of and challenges to professional practice; multi-professional and multi-agency working, changing health and social policies and their impact on practice, nature and understanding of professional knowledge and evaluation of the contribution of research. As part of this module you will also begin your “attachment” to a named outside agency. This attachment will allow you to develop links with this agency, throughout your wider degree programme, with the intention of providing you with opportunities to consider the practical application of your theoretical learning to the professional/workplace areana. This attachment will also form part of your formative assessment for this module.

More information

PP0434 -

Inequalities and Social Justice (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will be introduced to a range of concepts and theories related to Public Health, Social Determinants of Health, Needs analysis, and User Involvement. You will explore a wide curriculum including Inequalities in health, mechanisms for need assessment and user participation. You will debate emergent themes and issues based upon contemporary research in his field. The Module aims to introduce you to the concepts and principles related to Public Health, Inequalities in Health, and Needs Assessment. This will enable you to explore and debate theoretical positions related to inequalities, social justice, and the analysis of need. The Module aims to give you a firm theoretical basis to explore these issues in subsequent Levels of your degree, and to support your conceptual understanding of contemporary debates about inequality and social justice within integrated health and social care.

More information

PP4000 -

Children, Young People in Health and Social Care (Core,20 Credits)

Children and young people’s health and social care needs are often overshadowed by the health needs of older adults, and arguably services are less responsive to addressing their health concerns. In this module you will develop a detailed understanding of the context surrounding children’s and young people’s health, the policy and clinical drivers shaping health and social care services, and the impacts they have. The content will cover a range of problems from accessing healthcare, to safeguarding, child protection and mental health service provision. The adolescent phase is a unique time when the individual transitions from dependency on parents and other adults to acquiring independence and transitioning to adulthood with greater autonomy and self reliance. You will acquire critical knowledge of how young people engage in self management of illness such as Type 1 diabetes or access support in their transition to independence from living in care. The module will offer an ideal opportunity to re-examine the place of children and young people in the context of current health and social care policy such as those policies which advocate choice for children and young people in relation to their (health) care.

More information

RV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Nursing, Midwifery and Health; Social Work, Education and Community Wellbeing (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

PP0552 -

Research in Practice (Core,20 Credits)

This module will help you to further develop knowledge from the module ‘introduction to academic research’ through development of a deeper understanding of the research process.
The overall module aim is to support you in developing your research skills and knowledge. You will also further develop your ability to analyse and critique research literature and to consider its application to practice. The module will provide you with a strong grounding in a range of research methods. It will also enable you to understand the philosophical and theoretical frameworks that underpin these methods and the research process as a whole. Undertaking this module will help you to prepare for your final year dissertation / project

More information

PP0555 -

MAD Studies (Optional,20 Credits)

This module invites you to explore the concept of ‘madness’ with a consideration of ‘mental health’, ‘distress’ and ‘wellbeing’ through the perspectives of mental health service users and/or ‘survivors’. The survivors’ movement reject biological and genetic explanations of their mental health, they celebrate their difference and challenge the legal constraints placed upon them. In essence this is a political alignment within both the ‘anti psychiatry’ and ‘holistic’ movements in the UK and internationally. This module will therefore introduce you to the principle theorists Foucault, Laing, Beresford and LeFrancois. In addition the contested importance of mental health ‘recovery’ in current mental health provision will be explored along with critical challenges to diagnosis, treatment and potential stigma. Recovery refers to the affirming process of discovering (or rediscovering) a positive sense of self and accepting and coping with the reality of any ongoing mental health distress. This in turn includes a critic of the biological determinism often associated with any mental health pathology. The module will take a historical perspective to the field of madness including topics of architecture and art as well as the early interpretations and treatments. Intersectionality will also be considered through the relative influences of gender, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation providing a fuller understanding of how these effect the mad narrative.

More information

PP0556 -

International Perspectives on Health and Social Care (Core,20 Credits)

This module will enable you to debate issues of citizenship, nationality, rights and duties in relation to health care and social welfare, through an understanding of forms of social capital and 'social ills' from a global perspective. You will analyse the development, implementation and diffusion of health and welfare policies in particular areas of the world, (for example India, China, the Pacific Rim), and assess their impact on the wellbeing of local populations.

The module aims to foster an understanding of the benefits and principles of comparative social policy analysis, as well as enabling you to debate issues of citizenship, nationality, rights and duties in relation to health and welfare provision through an understanding of the global and local distribution of social goods and social ills.

More information

PP0558 -

The Older Person in Health & Social Care systems (Core,20 Credits)

The Module aims to introduce key theories that attempt to explain “modern ageing”, including the notion of the Third and Fourth Ages, ageism, the diversity of older people, and the impact of professional and political agendas on health and social care policies, and their effect in the delivery of appropriate interventions for individuals and groups. By exploring different social theories, you will consider how societies have attempted to give shape to, the personal lives of older people, and you will develop an understanding how personal experiences of being older are constituted not only through chronological age, but also through issues of social class, (dis)ability, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. This module introduces you to current debates regarding ageing and later life. You will consider historical contexts of “old age, work and welfare”, and debate why some societies expect individuals to stop work at a defined age and the impact this has on their lives. You will debate both the challenges and opportunities ageing societies bring at local, national and global levels, in and around the areas of health and social care, and consider changing societal attitudes as to what constitutes an “older person”, including the impact of the media.

More information

PP0559 -

Communication Skills & Professional Boundaries (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of this Module is to debate the development of boundaries as an important stage in the practice of various groups of practitioners in health and social care, exploring opportunities for collaborative working and evaluating the success of this in terms of the agenda of multi-professional/integrated working. It will afford you opportunities to analyse concepts associated with collaboration, (or lack of), between “professionals” working in health and social care. You will also engage with and analyse the nature of, and challenges to, professional practice which have emerged as a result of multi-professional and multi-agency working. You will also consider theories of communication between professional groups focussing in particular on the use of “professional language” as a barrier to integrated working. You will also consider, in consultation with your named external agency, the practical issues associated with collaboration, (or lack of), between “professionals” working in health and social care settings, and the impact on service delivery. This will include you considering examples of models from past and current literature, critical evaluation of case studies and the evidence and personal knowledge based on your own, and other students and staff experiences, by engaging in exercises allowing reflection on individual experiences as a consumer of health and social care and consider these in terms of concepts from the module. and a changing health and social context in which professional working is influenced by policies - policies determined by the state which do, or have the potential to, impact on the realities of professional working and may not always correspond to real or perceived professional interactions and/or interventions.

More information

PP0560 -

Health and Neighbourhood Renewal (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will critically examine the interplay between public health; community-based health and social care provision; and community regeneration policies. You will develop skills in community profiling; critical analysis of the policies of regeneration; and critically reviewing community participation in health and social care delivery. The aim of this Module is to analyse and debate how public health and social care priorities are linked with the study of ‘communities’. Through an exploration of community development as an approach to working with communities you will evaluate lay health perspectives of health and social care. Theories of participation and empowerment will be debated and you will be introduced to different approaches to undertaking participative needs analysis exercises with communities. The Module also analyses how regeneration policies interact with wider health and social care policies.

More information

PP5000 -

Public Health Theory and Practice (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to support you to develop a critical understanding of public health theory, policy and research and apply this to the complex and dynamic health and social care context.

In this module you will critically explore and analyse key concepts relating to public health theory and practice. This will include developments in public health policy and prevention research and approaches to practice. You will examine the changing public health context and the emergence of ‘lifestyle illnesses’ which affect population health and individual health behaviours. You will be introduced to behavioural science and behaviour change theory, to equip you with a detailed understanding of the challenge and opportunities for improving health behaviours and lifestyles in individuals and populations.

The module also will examine research conducted on healthcare risks, lay beliefs, help seeking behaviour and the ‘prevention paradox’. Key sessions will support you to critically explore a range of public health initiatives from past and current literature, critical evaluation of case studies and the evidence and personal knowledge based on your own, and other students’ and tutors’ experiences.

More information

PP5001 -

Creative Helping Practices (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn to identify, engage and apply a range of creative helping practices in the context of their programme of study. Students will be encouraged to develop a deeper understanding of alternatives to traditional interventions to allow for work with diverse communities and clients. You will explore the practicalities associated with engaging with alternative approaches, including the realities of accessing creative helping practices, developing engagement with clients, and understanding how these can support wellbeing across the life course. You will be introduced to a range of methods and supported to explore how these can be engaged with in practice.

More information

RV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Nursing, Midwifery and Health; Social Work, Education and Community Wellbeing (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

PP0564 -

Integrated Health & Social Care: Study Abroad (Optional,120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study between levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year abroad at a partner university equivalent to 120 UK credits. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “BSC (Hons) Integrated Health and Social Care (with Study Abroad Year)”.

More information

PP0565 -

Health and Life Sciences Work Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a full year 120 credit module available on degree courses which include a work placement year which is taken as an additional year of study between levels 5 and 6 (the length of the placement will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks and no more than 52 weeks). You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “BSC (Hons) Integrated Health and Social Care (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the training agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

More information

PP0640 -

Management and Leadership in Integrated Health & Social Care (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will appraise contemporary management and leadership in Integrated Health and Social Care settings by reviewing the skills and knowledge needed to manage successfully. You will compare theories and concepts underpinning management and leadership in health and social care initiatives in relation to political, social, cultural and professional perspectives in the workplace, by drawing on real life examples. The aim of this Module is to prepare you to work effectively within management settings by giving you insights into the running of a wide variety of integrated health and social care initiatives in the public, voluntary and private sectors, and as such this module lends itself to a continuation/enhancement of the links you have formed with your external agency in the first 2 years of your degree.

More information

PP0642 -

Safe and Effective Practice in Integrated Health & Social Care (Core,20 Credits)

This module will involve you in thinking about the non technical skills which often underpin human error. You will consider error from the perspective of the organisation, individual professionals and teams and patients/service users and their family. You will analyse human behaviour in the context of health and social care service design and delivery. Specifically the relationship between systems, technology and human behaviour will be explored to expose opportunities for avoidable harm and opportunity to mitigate against harm.

You will draw upon learning from previous modules and in conjunction with your module ‘management & leadership in health & social care’.

More information

PP0643 -

Changing Landscapes and Policy Critiques in Integrated Health and Social Care (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to engage you in critical discussion and analysis of emerging trends in contemporary health and social care issues and policies. You will build on existing knowledge and develop your understanding of the changing social and political contexts for health and social care issues and policies. This module also allows you to develop knowledge and expertise in relation to an area of interest through independent enquiry.

The module encourages you to develop an understanding of local, national and global perspectives on emerging trends and contemporary issues and to explore a range of theoretical frameworks.

You will examine health and social care contexts including organisations, neighbourhoods and communities and explore the contribution of local authorities and other public sector organisations, families, business and voluntary organisations. You will also evaluate the impact of health and social care policies on particular communities, professionals and/or organisations and critically reflect on policy and practice using research evidence.

You will be encouraged to explore a range of question in relation to an emerging issue. For example:

What are the challenges facing organisations delivering health and social care?
What impact do health and social care policies have on professionals and service users?
What roles do professionals and service users have in developing health and social care policies and practice?
What are the ‘drivers for change’ in relation to Health and social care?

More information

PP0644 -

Core Project (Core,40 Credits)

Building on research understanding and skills developed throughout your programme, this module will introduce you to key ideas, perspectives and activities in social research relevant to Integrated Health and Social Care. You will develop knowledge and understanding about what and how things can be ‘known’ (epistemology), ways of seeing the world (paradigms), approaches and traditions in research (methodology), collecting or generating data (methods) and analysing or interpreting findings (analysis). In addition, you will understand how to relate each of these elements into a coherent research project and will appreciate relevant ethical issues that apply to your research.

More information

PP6000 -

Health Care Interventions, Policy and Practice (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will examine how health care interventions are developed in health and social care systems, how they are evaluated and the impacts they have on populations and service users. Health researchers continually design and test new services and interventions to improve the health of populations. However, significant challenges arise in how they are developed and implemented in health and social care systems. Researchers are only beginning to understand the key barriers to implementing them in current healthcare routines. The implementation of new innovations in health has considerable significance for health and social care and how services can be improved. Often major barriers prevent their successful adoption, and this module will explore the complexity surrounding this major challenge to service improvement. You will examine critically the different ways to evaluate interventions and how to judge success or effectiveness, You will also critically explore the professional, organizational and system challenges or barriers to implementation, and how some possible solutions have succeeded or failed. For instance, you will be introduced to co-production theory and whether this is a viable pathway to effective implementation of innovations and new services in health and social care.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

PP0425 -

Learning at University (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide formal academic induction across your whole first year of study, introducing you to the academic literacy practices required to perform successfully in higher education. The module will equip you to become effective, active, independent learners throughout the rest of your degree. It will enable you to recognise appropriate approaches to study in higher education and begin to develop the academic skills, qualities and competencies expected of students on the programme. The module has been designed to support you to recognise and debate key concepts of your degree by encouraging you to actively engage in discussion and debate to enable you to make-sense of the subject-curricula and discourse communities of the discipline area and to develop your own standpoint.
The module will illuminate how to use, at various points throughout the programme, the expertise and resources on offer in a range of formats via, for instance, the Northumbria Skills framework including Skills Plus.

More information

PP0428 -

Introduction to Academic Research (Core,20 Credits)

This module provides you with an introduction to academic research within health and social sciences disciplines. In an increasingly information-rich society, knowledge and skills in research play an essential role in enabling society to anticipate, and respond to, unexpected challenges and change. Therefore, understanding and using research are recognised as essential requirements for all professionals to inform service improvement. This module is designed to develop your understanding of the nature, purpose, principles, practical challenges and ethics of research by examining a broad range of research methodologies and methods. You will also learn essential concepts and languages in research.

The focus of the module is on specific and very important aspects of research for you:
• Understanding the role of research;
• Introduction to research methodologies and how these underpin different forms of knowledge;
• Introduction to research methods and their strengths and weaknesses;
• Reviewing and critiquing literature with methodological appropriateness and with particular reference to the application to practice;
• understanding the importance of the ethical issues in research;
• Application of knowledge to practice and putting research to use.

This module will support you to develop the research skills and knowledge necessary that are transferable across disciplines. This module will assist you in the conception, development, documentation, delivery and reporting of your independent research. The module is invaluable in providing you with a solid foundation from which to develop your independent research, including final year project.

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PP0431 -

Foundations of Health & Social Care Policy and Practice (Core,20 Credits)

Improvements in living standards and the introduction of new technologies have had a significant impact on life expectancy of both older people, who live longer than ever before, and younger people with disabilities, who are enjoying longer and a better quality of life. This module has been designed to allow you to consider ways in which health and social care can be conceptualised and experienced through a variety of different methodologies. These include, exploring levels of analysis and professional and lay perspectives on health and social care. The underpinning eclectic concepts of health and social care will be examined in an integrated way. In addition you will be encouraged to explore ethical issues in health and social care such as equity, choice, need, autonomy, freedom, rationing and justice.

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PP0432 -

Professional Practice and the Health & Social Care Workplace (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide an introduction and understanding of contemporary key issues in professional practice in Health and Social Care, and to enable you to relate the impact of various professions and their practice to the subject of Integrated Health and Social Care. It will enable you to make links between current research based evidence and social and health care policy and professionalism. Issues covered will include the changing nature of and challenges to professional practice; multi-professional and multi-agency working, changing health and social policies and their impact on practice, nature and understanding of professional knowledge and evaluation of the contribution of research. As part of this module you will also begin your “attachment” to a named outside agency. This attachment will allow you to develop links with this agency, throughout your wider degree programme, with the intention of providing you with opportunities to consider the practical application of your theoretical learning to the professional/workplace areana. This attachment will also form part of your formative assessment for this module.

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PP0434 -

Inequalities and Social Justice (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will be introduced to a range of concepts and theories related to Public Health, Social Determinants of Health, Needs analysis, and User Involvement. You will explore a wide curriculum including Inequalities in health, mechanisms for need assessment and user participation. You will debate emergent themes and issues based upon contemporary research in his field. The Module aims to introduce you to the concepts and principles related to Public Health, Inequalities in Health, and Needs Assessment. This will enable you to explore and debate theoretical positions related to inequalities, social justice, and the analysis of need. The Module aims to give you a firm theoretical basis to explore these issues in subsequent Levels of your degree, and to support your conceptual understanding of contemporary debates about inequality and social justice within integrated health and social care.

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PP4000 -

Children, Young People in Health and Social Care (Core,20 Credits)

Children and young people’s health and social care needs are often overshadowed by the health needs of older adults, and arguably services are less responsive to addressing their health concerns. In this module you will develop a detailed understanding of the context surrounding children’s and young people’s health, the policy and clinical drivers shaping health and social care services, and the impacts they have. The content will cover a range of problems from accessing healthcare, to safeguarding, child protection and mental health service provision. The adolescent phase is a unique time when the individual transitions from dependency on parents and other adults to acquiring independence and transitioning to adulthood with greater autonomy and self reliance. You will acquire critical knowledge of how young people engage in self management of illness such as Type 1 diabetes or access support in their transition to independence from living in care. The module will offer an ideal opportunity to re-examine the place of children and young people in the context of current health and social care policy such as those policies which advocate choice for children and young people in relation to their (health) care.

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RV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Nursing, Midwifery and Health; Social Work, Education and Community Wellbeing (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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PP0552 -

Research in Practice (Core,20 Credits)

This module will help you to further develop knowledge from the module ‘introduction to academic research’ through development of a deeper understanding of the research process.
The overall module aim is to support you in developing your research skills and knowledge. You will also further develop your ability to analyse and critique research literature and to consider its application to practice. The module will provide you with a strong grounding in a range of research methods. It will also enable you to understand the philosophical and theoretical frameworks that underpin these methods and the research process as a whole. Undertaking this module will help you to prepare for your final year dissertation / project

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PP0555 -

MAD Studies (Optional,20 Credits)

This module invites you to explore the concept of ‘madness’ with a consideration of ‘mental health’, ‘distress’ and ‘wellbeing’ through the perspectives of mental health service users and/or ‘survivors’. The survivors’ movement reject biological and genetic explanations of their mental health, they celebrate their difference and challenge the legal constraints placed upon them. In essence this is a political alignment within both the ‘anti psychiatry’ and ‘holistic’ movements in the UK and internationally. This module will therefore introduce you to the principle theorists Foucault, Laing, Beresford and LeFrancois. In addition the contested importance of mental health ‘recovery’ in current mental health provision will be explored along with critical challenges to diagnosis, treatment and potential stigma. Recovery refers to the affirming process of discovering (or rediscovering) a positive sense of self and accepting and coping with the reality of any ongoing mental health distress. This in turn includes a critic of the biological determinism often associated with any mental health pathology. The module will take a historical perspective to the field of madness including topics of architecture and art as well as the early interpretations and treatments. Intersectionality will also be considered through the relative influences of gender, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation providing a fuller understanding of how these effect the mad narrative.

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PP0556 -

International Perspectives on Health and Social Care (Core,20 Credits)

This module will enable you to debate issues of citizenship, nationality, rights and duties in relation to health care and social welfare, through an understanding of forms of social capital and 'social ills' from a global perspective. You will analyse the development, implementation and diffusion of health and welfare policies in particular areas of the world, (for example India, China, the Pacific Rim), and assess their impact on the wellbeing of local populations.

The module aims to foster an understanding of the benefits and principles of comparative social policy analysis, as well as enabling you to debate issues of citizenship, nationality, rights and duties in relation to health and welfare provision through an understanding of the global and local distribution of social goods and social ills.

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PP0558 -

The Older Person in Health & Social Care systems (Core,20 Credits)

The Module aims to introduce key theories that attempt to explain “modern ageing”, including the notion of the Third and Fourth Ages, ageism, the diversity of older people, and the impact of professional and political agendas on health and social care policies, and their effect in the delivery of appropriate interventions for individuals and groups. By exploring different social theories, you will consider how societies have attempted to give shape to, the personal lives of older people, and you will develop an understanding how personal experiences of being older are constituted not only through chronological age, but also through issues of social class, (dis)ability, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. This module introduces you to current debates regarding ageing and later life. You will consider historical contexts of “old age, work and welfare”, and debate why some societies expect individuals to stop work at a defined age and the impact this has on their lives. You will debate both the challenges and opportunities ageing societies bring at local, national and global levels, in and around the areas of health and social care, and consider changing societal attitudes as to what constitutes an “older person”, including the impact of the media.

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PP0559 -

Communication Skills & Professional Boundaries (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of this Module is to debate the development of boundaries as an important stage in the practice of various groups of practitioners in health and social care, exploring opportunities for collaborative working and evaluating the success of this in terms of the agenda of multi-professional/integrated working. It will afford you opportunities to analyse concepts associated with collaboration, (or lack of), between “professionals” working in health and social care. You will also engage with and analyse the nature of, and challenges to, professional practice which have emerged as a result of multi-professional and multi-agency working. You will also consider theories of communication between professional groups focussing in particular on the use of “professional language” as a barrier to integrated working. You will also consider, in consultation with your named external agency, the practical issues associated with collaboration, (or lack of), between “professionals” working in health and social care settings, and the impact on service delivery. This will include you considering examples of models from past and current literature, critical evaluation of case studies and the evidence and personal knowledge based on your own, and other students and staff experiences, by engaging in exercises allowing reflection on individual experiences as a consumer of health and social care and consider these in terms of concepts from the module. and a changing health and social context in which professional working is influenced by policies - policies determined by the state which do, or have the potential to, impact on the realities of professional working and may not always correspond to real or perceived professional interactions and/or interventions.

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PP0560 -

Health and Neighbourhood Renewal (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will critically examine the interplay between public health; community-based health and social care provision; and community regeneration policies. You will develop skills in community profiling; critical analysis of the policies of regeneration; and critically reviewing community participation in health and social care delivery. The aim of this Module is to analyse and debate how public health and social care priorities are linked with the study of ‘communities’. Through an exploration of community development as an approach to working with communities you will evaluate lay health perspectives of health and social care. Theories of participation and empowerment will be debated and you will be introduced to different approaches to undertaking participative needs analysis exercises with communities. The Module also analyses how regeneration policies interact with wider health and social care policies.

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PP5000 -

Public Health Theory and Practice (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to support you to develop a critical understanding of public health theory, policy and research and apply this to the complex and dynamic health and social care context.

In this module you will critically explore and analyse key concepts relating to public health theory and practice. This will include developments in public health policy and prevention research and approaches to practice. You will examine the changing public health context and the emergence of ‘lifestyle illnesses’ which affect population health and individual health behaviours. You will be introduced to behavioural science and behaviour change theory, to equip you with a detailed understanding of the challenge and opportunities for improving health behaviours and lifestyles in individuals and populations.

The module also will examine research conducted on healthcare risks, lay beliefs, help seeking behaviour and the ‘prevention paradox’. Key sessions will support you to critically explore a range of public health initiatives from past and current literature, critical evaluation of case studies and the evidence and personal knowledge based on your own, and other students’ and tutors’ experiences.

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PP5001 -

Creative Helping Practices (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn to identify, engage and apply a range of creative helping practices in the context of their programme of study. Students will be encouraged to develop a deeper understanding of alternatives to traditional interventions to allow for work with diverse communities and clients. You will explore the practicalities associated with engaging with alternative approaches, including the realities of accessing creative helping practices, developing engagement with clients, and understanding how these can support wellbeing across the life course. You will be introduced to a range of methods and supported to explore how these can be engaged with in practice.

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RV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Nursing, Midwifery and Health; Social Work, Education and Community Wellbeing (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

PP0564 -

Integrated Health & Social Care: Study Abroad (Optional,120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study between levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year abroad at a partner university equivalent to 120 UK credits. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “BSC (Hons) Integrated Health and Social Care (with Study Abroad Year)”.

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PP0565 -

Health and Life Sciences Work Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a full year 120 credit module available on degree courses which include a work placement year which is taken as an additional year of study between levels 5 and 6 (the length of the placement will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks and no more than 52 weeks). You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “BSC (Hons) Integrated Health and Social Care (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the training agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

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PP0640 -

Management and Leadership in Integrated Health & Social Care (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will appraise contemporary management and leadership in Integrated Health and Social Care settings by reviewing the skills and knowledge needed to manage successfully. You will compare theories and concepts underpinning management and leadership in health and social care initiatives in relation to political, social, cultural and professional perspectives in the workplace, by drawing on real life examples. The aim of this Module is to prepare you to work effectively within management settings by giving you insights into the running of a wide variety of integrated health and social care initiatives in the public, voluntary and private sectors, and as such this module lends itself to a continuation/enhancement of the links you have formed with your external agency in the first 2 years of your degree.

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PP0642 -

Safe and Effective Practice in Integrated Health & Social Care (Core,20 Credits)

This module will involve you in thinking about the non technical skills which often underpin human error. You will consider error from the perspective of the organisation, individual professionals and teams and patients/service users and their family. You will analyse human behaviour in the context of health and social care service design and delivery. Specifically the relationship between systems, technology and human behaviour will be explored to expose opportunities for avoidable harm and opportunity to mitigate against harm.

You will draw upon learning from previous modules and in conjunction with your module ‘management & leadership in health & social care’.

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PP0643 -

Changing Landscapes and Policy Critiques in Integrated Health and Social Care (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to engage you in critical discussion and analysis of emerging trends in contemporary health and social care issues and policies. You will build on existing knowledge and develop your understanding of the changing social and political contexts for health and social care issues and policies. This module also allows you to develop knowledge and expertise in relation to an area of interest through independent enquiry.

The module encourages you to develop an understanding of local, national and global perspectives on emerging trends and contemporary issues and to explore a range of theoretical frameworks.

You will examine health and social care contexts including organisations, neighbourhoods and communities and explore the contribution of local authorities and other public sector organisations, families, business and voluntary organisations. You will also evaluate the impact of health and social care policies on particular communities, professionals and/or organisations and critically reflect on policy and practice using research evidence.

You will be encouraged to explore a range of question in relation to an emerging issue. For example:

What are the challenges facing organisations delivering health and social care?
What impact do health and social care policies have on professionals and service users?
What roles do professionals and service users have in developing health and social care policies and practice?
What are the ‘drivers for change’ in relation to Health and social care?

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PP0644 -

Core Project (Core,40 Credits)

Building on research understanding and skills developed throughout your programme, this module will introduce you to key ideas, perspectives and activities in social research relevant to Integrated Health and Social Care. You will develop knowledge and understanding about what and how things can be ‘known’ (epistemology), ways of seeing the world (paradigms), approaches and traditions in research (methodology), collecting or generating data (methods) and analysing or interpreting findings (analysis). In addition, you will understand how to relate each of these elements into a coherent research project and will appreciate relevant ethical issues that apply to your research.

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PP6000 -

Health Care Interventions, Policy and Practice (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will examine how health care interventions are developed in health and social care systems, how they are evaluated and the impacts they have on populations and service users. Health researchers continually design and test new services and interventions to improve the health of populations. However, significant challenges arise in how they are developed and implemented in health and social care systems. Researchers are only beginning to understand the key barriers to implementing them in current healthcare routines. The implementation of new innovations in health has considerable significance for health and social care and how services can be improved. Often major barriers prevent their successful adoption, and this module will explore the complexity surrounding this major challenge to service improvement. You will examine critically the different ways to evaluate interventions and how to judge success or effectiveness, You will also critically explore the professional, organizational and system challenges or barriers to implementation, and how some possible solutions have succeeded or failed. For instance, you will be introduced to co-production theory and whether this is a viable pathway to effective implementation of innovations and new services in health and social care.

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To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

Health and Social Care BSc (Hons)

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

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Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with additional restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors, potentially to a full online offer, should further restrictions be deemed necessary in future. Our online activity will be delivered through Blackboard Ultra, enabling collaboration, connection and engagement with materials and people.

 

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