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Do you have a love of both language and literature? On NorthumbriaUniversity’s English language and literature course, you will studyfantastically stimulating and distinctive modules that range from Shakespeareto contemporary fiction, and from the fundamentals of grammar and syntax to theredefinition of what the ‘English’ language is.

Northumbria University aspire to help you as youhelp yourself in becoming a ‘citizen scholar’ who is able to thinkindependently and make your own contribution to the world. As part of this, weensure that you engage with advanced linguistic concepts and literature fromaround the world. We also offer options to broaden your experience and culturalsensitivity by studying abroad for a semester in your second year, usually inNorth America or mainland Europe.

This English degree is for you, if you are passionate about understandinglanguage, literature, and how the two connect. Enthusiastic,research-active staff ensure you will study a stimulating, distinctive, andwide range of modules, covering topics, issues, texts and concepts in bothlanguage and literature, from canonical figures like Shakespeare, tocutting-edge contemporary fiction and theory, from the fundamentals of grammarand syntax to the redefinition of what the ‘English’ language is. Students willdevelop the transferable skills in analysis, interpretation, communication,argument and research they need to excel at university, and after, as we aspireto help you help yourself become a confident, independent, criticaland active learner able to think and thrive as you make your contribution tothe world.

95% of EnglishLanguage and Literature students say that the course is intellectuallystimulating (National Student Survey, 2016).

Do you have a love of both language and literature? On NorthumbriaUniversity’s English language and literature course, you will studyfantastically stimulating and distinctive modules that range from Shakespeareto contemporary fiction, and from the fundamentals of grammar and syntax to theredefinition of what the ‘English’ language is.

Northumbria University aspire to help you as youhelp yourself in becoming a ‘citizen scholar’ who is able to thinkindependently and make your own contribution to the world. As part of this, weensure that you engage with advanced linguistic concepts and literature fromaround the world. We also offer options to broaden your experience and culturalsensitivity by studying abroad for a semester in your second year, usually inNorth America or mainland Europe.

This English degree is for you, if you are passionate about understandinglanguage, literature, and how the two connect. Enthusiastic,research-active staff ensure you will study a stimulating, distinctive, andwide range of modules, covering topics, issues, texts and concepts in bothlanguage and literature, from canonical figures like Shakespeare, tocutting-edge contemporary fiction and theory, from the fundamentals of grammarand syntax to the redefinition of what the ‘English’ language is. Students willdevelop the transferable skills in analysis, interpretation, communication,argument and research they need to excel at university, and after, as we aspireto help you help yourself become a confident, independent, criticaland active learner able to think and thrive as you make your contribution tothe world.

95% of EnglishLanguage and Literature students say that the course is intellectuallystimulating (National Student Survey, 2016).

Course Information

UCAS Code
Q390

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Humanities

Location
Lipman Building, Newcastle City Campus

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019

Department / Humanities

Our Department of Humanities includes the subject areas of History, English Literature, English Language and Linguistics, Creative Writing and American Studies.

Humanities Video Gallery

Discover more about what you will learn on the course, more about our academics research interests, and hear from current students by watching our videos

Book an Open Day / Experience English Language and Literature BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

English at Northumbria enjoys international recognition for the quality of teaching and research, and our modules are routinely praised by external examiners. Our publications in English and Creative Writing are ranked 15th in the country for their quality, by the 2014 Research Excellence Framework.
Our staff actively explore and shape what the disciplines of linguistic and literary study mean in the 21st century, and our expertise and enthusiasm feed directly into what we teach and what you learn.

A very high proportion of our students (94%) think that staff are enthusiastic and make the subject interesting, according to the National Student Survey 2015.

In linguistics, Northumbria has wide-ranging expertise in cognitive linguistics, semantics, pragmatics and English grammar. In literature, our staff research topics from Shakespeare to the modern graphic novel.

English Language and Literature Student Profiles

Hear what it is really like to study English Language and Literature BA (Hons) from our current students.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Language and Literature BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Your tutors will use a variety of teaching methods including lectures, seminars, discussion activities, group tasks and individual tutorials. These will be backed up by a well-designed support system that ensures you have a successful learning journey in each academic year. You will not only receive extensive feedback but also ‘feed-forward’ as tutors work with you to explore how you can keep improving on previous work.

Our assessment strategy is designed to support student-centred learning, based on our understanding that everyone has different needs, strengths and enthusiasms. Assessments will develop your communication skills while also inspiring you to analyse evidence, pursue original thought and persuade others of your ideas. Assessment methods will include essays, exams, coursework and a final-year dissertation.

A wide range of optionmodules are offered on this course. To ensure the quality of the studentlearning experience, some modules are subject to minimum and maximum studentnumbers.

Staff / Meet the Team

Our students learn from the best inspirational academic staff with a genuine passion for their subject. Our courses are at the forefront of current knowledge and practice and are shaped by world-leading and internationally excellent research.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Language and Literature BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Language and Literature. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) is embedded throughout the course with tools such as the ‘Blackboard’ eLearning Portal and electronic reading lists that will guide your preparation for seminars and independent research. The use of TEL caters for different learning styles and encourages reflective thought.

The 24/7 University Library achieves some of the highest levels of student satisfaction in the UK and has held the Cabinet Office accreditation for Customer Service Excellence since 2010.

There are over half a million print books and another 500,000 electronic books available online. The University has invested in specialist linguistics software and further facilities are available at the Institute for the Humanities, in the University’s Lipman Building. These include a resource room, specialist computing equipment and interview rooms.

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Language and Literature BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Language and Literature. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

At Northumbria you will learn to carry out your own research projects as part of our strong research-rich ethos, which has enabled the University to climb into the UK’s top 30 for research power in English Language and Literature.

In your first year you will be introduced to enquiry-based learning, engaging critically with research in seminars and assessments. In your second year there is increased focus on starting to conduct your own research. In the final year you will undertake a dissertation in either linguistics or literature, or a combination of the two. It’s a test of academic maturity that will enable you to demonstrate independent learning, academic rigour, self-directed purpose and intellectual ambition.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Language and Literature BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Language and Literature. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Your tutors will work closely with the University’s Careers and Employment Service to give you the best advice and resources, whatever your ambitions.

Employability is embedded throughout our learning and teaching strategies. Core and optional modules cultivate your competence and self-confidence, enhancing transferable skills such as effective time management, excellent communication, good teamwork and high level analysis.

In your second year you will have the option of studying in another country. North America and mainland Europe are popular places for students to spend a semester, taking modules that will count towards their final degree. This type of international experience will give you an extra edge in the jobs market.

 

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

The Hub / The student view

Book an Open Day / Experience English Language and Literature BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

With highly honed skills in communication and analysis, you will be ready to hit the ground running once you start a career. In recent years, many of our graduates have developed successful careers in marketing, PR, media, journalism, communications, publishing, advertising, education (at various levels), local government, and in both public and private sectors. Others have gone on to postgraduate study.

Whatever you decide to do, you will have strong employability as a result of having acquired the characteristics of a Northumbria graduate. These include critical reflection and self-learning, collaboration and curiosity, and the ability to apply your knowledge to solve problems in ways that are sustainable and ethical.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Language and Literature BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Who would this Course suit?

This course is for people who are passionate about studying language and literature, and how the two connect. 

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 units at Distinction and 27 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A level.

 

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

Whilst books are made available via the University Library, you may wish to purchase additional primary texts throughout the duration of your course, an approximate cost would be in the range of £120-£200.

FUNDING INFORMATION

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for UK/EU undergraduate tuition fee information**.

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information.

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying.

Click here for information on fee liability.

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Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

EL4001 -

Introduction to Literary Studies (Core, 20 Credits)

You will be given the opportunity to familiarise yourself with conceptual issues such as canonicity, the unconscious, the tragic, the nature of the author, gender and postmodernity. Lectures will introduce you to these concepts and modes of applying these to literary texts as well as introducing you to new material in the texts themselves. Seminars will follow the lectures, where you will discuss and explore with your tutor and with your fellow students both the texts and their historical and theoretical contexts.

More information

EL4007 -

Understanding English Grammar (Core, 20 Credits)

We will begin by asking what language is and how it is organised. What is it that we know when we know how to speak or write a language?

You will learn that language is systematically structured in various ways. You will learn how, as linguists, we can uncover some of those structures by investigating patterns and regularities in the way language is used. By examining everyday written and spoken language, you will learn about how language is organised, in terms of sounds (phonology), word forms (morphology), and sentence structures (syntax).

This module will introduce you to new ways of thinking about language and describing it. The concepts and terminology that you will learn on this module will provide you with an important foundation for studying many other questions and issues in linguistics. In addition, you will develop the ability to work independently as well as collaboratively with others. These transferable skills will in turn contribute to your personal and professional development.

More information

EL4008 -

Introduction to Language and Literature (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module, you will be studying the dynamic connection between language and literature. You will be introduced to the field of stylistics, which examines literary texts through linguistic analyses. This module focuses on the discussion of how literary effects are created, and how they can be analysed through linguistic means. You will study relevant linguistic theories and frameworks in this module, and will develop their abilities by applying linguistic theories to examine selected literary texts of differing genres.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to develop a number of transferable skills (e.g. communication, presentation and group work) when studying literary and linguistic texts within a wide range of cultural, social and political contexts. This will help develop your employability skills, as well as to improve your cultural awareness and intellectual openness.

More information

EL4009 -

Approaches to Language Study (Core, 20 Credits)

This module provides an introduction to the study of language. It begins with a consideration of the nature of language including its origins and properties. It then looks at the various levels of analysis open to the linguist starting with the sound of languages and how these are combined, moving on to words and sentences and then examining the construction of meaning. The module also looks at how languages are acquired, how they are stored in the brain and how this knowledge is deployed in communication. From a social point of view we will examine the factors that influence different varieties of a language at any point in time, and also how and why languages change and sometimes die. While the focus will be on English, other languages will be used to illustrate the range of features that languages may incorporate. In addition, you will develop the ability to work independently as well as collaboratively with others. These transferable skills will in turn contribute to your personal and professional development.

More information

EL4016 -

Talking Texts (Core, 20 Credits)

This module offers students a forum to develop academic skills in close reading and analysis. A range of texts are examined within a reading-focussed workshop, including: the novel, short stories, poetry, plays, journalism, academic essays and online media such as blogs and flash fiction. Students are exposed to a range of writing in order to consider and develop their own reading practices. The discursive workshops develop speaking, listening, and critical skills through participation in classroom activities. The module prepares students for work at degree level, encouraging them to become independent learners in a supportive environment.

More information

EL4017 -

Gothic Stories: Nineteenth Century to the Present (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module you will be given the opportunity to study a range of gothic texts from the nineteenth century to the contemporary period. This will provide you with the opportunity to explore the conventions of the genre as well as some of the ways in which gothic writing reflects and/or questions assumptions about race, gender, social class and sexuality. You will learn about the cultural significance of many familiar gothic motifs and figures such as ghosts, uncanny doubles, haunted houses and vampires.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5012 -

Humanities Study Abroad (40 credit) (Optional, 40 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is a semester based 40 credit module which is available on degree courses which facilitate study abroad within the programme. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be constructed to meet the learning outcomes for the programme for the semester in question, dependent on suitable modules from the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). The module will be assessed by conversion of graded marks from the host University.

Learning outcomes on the year-long modules on which the student is unable to attend the home institution must be met at the host institution, and marks from the host are incorporated into the modules as part of the overall assessment.

More information

EL5001 -

Textual Studies (Core, 20 Credits)

Running alongside the module ‘Early Modern Cultures’ (EL5003) in semester 1, and ‘Modernism and Modernity’ (EL5004) in semester 2, this module provides a forum for discussion and debate. Helping to introduce you to two distinct cultural moments, the early modern and modernist periods, the module complements these modules through seminar dialogue.

Building upon skills you have acquired in textual analysis and discussion at Level 4, this module fosters key research skills that will become vital to study at level 6.

More information

EL5003 -

Early Modern Cultures (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn to read texts written in the period 1500-1700 historically. Lectures and seminars will encourage you to learn about the early modern period, and to situate texts by authors such as William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas More, and Philip Sidney. You will learn about poetry, prose, and drama – situating literary genres from the period in relation to themes that include: class, race, sexuality, politics, authority, gender, and ideas of literary production itself. Lectures will trace the afterlives of some of the most influential texts ever written, and will encourage you to read these textual traditions in light of a range of western literary ideologies.

Building upon work completed at Level 4 on early modern authors like Shakespeare and Donne, this module offers students a more comprehensive survey of the early modern period. Encouraging students to read literature historically, Early Modern Cultures fosters key skills in tutor-led and independent reading and research that will complement a range of studies at level 6.

More information

EL5004 -

Modernism and Modernity (Core, 20 Credits)

Through this module you will gain an understanding of the relation between literary modernism and modernity in the early part of the twentieth century. The module provides you with conceptual and historical frameworks for understanding the relation between art and social life. It gives you an opportunity to engage with the ways in which different literary genres prompted modernist experiments in form and with the various debates taking place between literary critics, writers, philosophers and cultural historians in early-twentieth-century Britain and the USA.

More information

EL5013 -

Language and Society (Core, 20 Credits)

You will examine the social meaning of variation in language use and language perception through the critical evaluation of the main research themes in sociolinguistics. As such, you will pay particular attention to historical, contemporary and emerging empirical research investigating social and regional linguistic variation in the UK and elsewhere; the relationship between language and identity, language and ethnicity, age, gender and social class; the investigation and implications of public attitudes towards linguistic diversity, the conscious and unconscious linguistic choices speakers make in specific contexts, and the development and identification of speech communities; and stylistic variation in language use.

You will also pay particular attention to current issues and debates within the field, again in terms of the findings of key empirical research investigating socio-psychological and contextual perspectives to the study of sociolinguistics. Throughout the module, you will evaluate the many varied perspectives regarding the role of language in society which you encounter, and establish your own view of and position within these debates, developing your ability to present your own viewpoint, both in speech and in writing.

More information

EL5014 -

History of English (Core, 20 Credits)

This module will place Present-day English in an historical context, examining some of the diachronic processes which have shaped the Present-day language. You will learn what earlier forms of English look like, how they differ from Present-day English and how to interpret evidence for language change. The main focus of the module will be on how and why English changes during its history. We will examine the role that speakers play in shaping the language by situating changes within their social context.

Through detailed examination of particular changes, we will identify recurrent patterns of change. You will learn to reconstruct patterns of change from textual evidence. We will engage with the key debates within historical linguistics, by evaluating and critiquing the work of researchers in the field. By engaging you with current research findings and methods, the module will equip you with skills for empirical analysis of historical linguistic data. Practical work with computerised datasets (corpora) will develop key transferrable skills in ICT, data analysis and your abilities to solve problems independently and/or collaboratively. Employers value these skills, so they will enhance your employability.

More information

EL5015 -

Language and Literature (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module, you will develop a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the field of stylistics. You will study the history and development of modern stylistics, and the key principles and theories of literary linguistics. Surrounding the key principles of texualism and contextualism, you will study three strands of stylistics, namely functional stylistics, narrative stylistics and cognitive stylistics. Within each of these strands, you will study how relevant research methods can help you explore a wide variety of linguistic features in prose fiction, poems, plays and other literary and non-literary discourses.

Through learning about the different ways in which stylistics theories and methods develop over time and interact with different academic disciplines, you will further develop and enhance your critical analytical skills and creative thinking when approaching complex and diverse issues in language use.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5009 -

Humanities Work Placement Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks. You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AD5010 -

Humanities Study Abroad Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

EL6001 -

English Dissertation (Optional, 40 Credits)

In your third year you will be ready to become an independent thinker and researcher. The dissertation is your opportunity to research and write a substantial investigation of a topic that you are really passionate about. Your tutors will support you as you learn how to work independently and to manage a large project. You will also learn project-management, research, presentation and writing skills. You will learn to be self-motivated and independent. By the end of the module you will have produced a major piece of work that you can be proud of, and you will be ready to continue as an independent thinker in further study or in the graduate job you go on to at the end of your third year.

More information

EL6002 -

Alternative Worlds: Utopian Dreams and Dystopian Nightmares (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module examines a selection of utopian and dystopian fiction of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It provides an interesting area for you to apply and further develop critical theories explored in level 4 and 5 modules (especially those concerning gender, class, and ethnicity) through an examination of a challenging genre that embraces the complex field of non-realist representation, science fiction, satire and social commentary, prediction, politics and polemic. Some of the issues on which the module focuses include evolution, progress, eugenics, genetics, man and machine, alternative histories, apocalypse, ‘racial’ and gendered identities and conflicts. The module also aims to explore genre definitions and limitations, particularly the divide between utopian and dystopian fiction.

More information

EL6004 -

Vamps and Virgins: Gothic Sexualities (Optional, 20 Credits)

From Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Christabel (1816) to Alan Ball’s True Blood (2008-), this module invites you to explore the dark, shadowy world of the Gothic in relation to a diverse range of literary texts and modern media. Combining the study of familiar canonical fictions with new and challenging material, we will train our focus on the enigmatic figure of the vampire, examining its various transitions and developments through the lens of critical and cultural theory.

Through an analysis of the Gothic, the module aims to develop your critical thinking, as well as your existing knowledge of literature, film, and television dating from 1816 to the present day. In doing so, it will encourage you to reflect on and interrogate the complex ways in which Gothic texts engage with, and intervene in, broader cultural debates about gender and sexuality.

More information

EL6005 -

Travel Writing (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will explore some key topics in contemporary travel writing (such as the environment; the end of European colonialism; war and the Cold War; and tourism). In your explorations you will investigate the way in which travel writing reflects and contributes to contemporary conversations about politics, culture, the environment, and features of our contemporary world such as globalization, mass media, and global warming. You will look at a variety of forms including essays, books, radio broadcasts, and journalism, and will consider how these different forms are utilized by travel writers.

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EL6006 -

Romantic Politics: British Literary Responses to the French Revolution (Optional, 20 Credits)

The French Revolution in 1789 marked the beginning of intense debate in Britain about liberty and society, equality and order, justice and happiness. Literature was seen as the key site for these new imagined world orders; it was the realm in which imagination, politics, and philosophy could converge. You will focus on the intense decade of the 1790s and encounter some of the most dazzling writers of this (or any) age: Edmund Burke’s conservative dream of nation was followed by Thomas Paine’s assertion of the rights of man; Mary Wollstonecraft championed the rights of woman; William Godwin transformed people’s lives through his philosophical writings and wrote thrilling novels demonstrating his philosophical beliefs in action; Jane Austen, often criticized for being apolitical, appears to be offering a commentary on cult of the individual in Sense and Sensibility, published in 1811 but written in the turbulent decade of the 1790s; Anna Laetitia Barbauld published anonymous tracts asserting the right of the people to participate in government, wrote brilliant poetry, and transformed educational writings; Helen Maria Williams published letters from France celebrating the newly liberated nation; and William Wordsworth and S.T. Coleridge revolutionised poetry. On this module will you will examine an extraordinary period of debates fueled by exhilaration and despair, and of great hopes for the transformative powers of literature.

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EL6007 -

Sin, Sex, and Violence: Marlowe in Context (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will enhance your awareness and appreciation of one of the most controversial and stimulating authors of the early modern period (and beyond!), Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593). Marlowe wrote plays and poems that expose our darkest hearts, showing characters lusting for power, and each other. Building on your brief contact with Marlowe at Level 5, this module will offer a chronological survey of his short but staggering career, situating each of his works in relation to the tumultuous contexts of their production and reception, including later appropriations. This will involve looking at Marlowe in relation to discussions of early modern politics, religious conflict, sexuality, urbanisation, imperialism, science and magic, ethnicity, geography, and historiography. The module therefore offers a unique opportunity to see how one writer’s remarkable career developed.

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EL6008 -

Hacks, harlots & highwaymen: the origins of the literary marketplace, 1660-1730 (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will enhance your knowledge and appreciation of the exciting decades during which a professional literary marketplace first took shape in England, and build on your awareness of the wealth of new literary genres that evolved at this time, such as the first novels, journalism, ballad opera, criminal biography, autobiography and literary criticism. You will study these newly developing genres alongside established, yet rapidly evolving, modes of writing already in existence in England, such as poetry, drama and satire. Many of these forms of writing featured characters that fascinated early readers much as they continue to do so today, from highwaymen, prisoners and prostitutes to politicians and royalty, and they evolved in the context of new dynamic literary spaces such as the first coffee houses, West End theatres and Grub Street. By studying such a wide range of different forms of writing, you will build on previous knowledge gained in second and third year core modules in understanding how the literary marketplace of today’s modern world first took shape in the hands of authors, editors, publishers, booksellers, hack writers and early celebrities who used print publication as a means to serve a variety of ends, be this the pursuit of literary fame, financial gain or public support.

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EL6009 -

Romanticism and Childhood (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will inform you about the transformations to the concept of childhood that occurred in the Romantic period (1760-1830). It will challenge you to analyse various celebrated representations of children and childhood in British Romantic literature. A new and distinctive attitude towards childhood was a core element of Romantic culture. Many British Romantic writers were invested in such issues as children’s education, imaginative fantasy literature, child-psychology, social injustices afflicting children, and religious questions of childhood innocence. This module will encourage you to develop an historical awareness of the changing culture of childhood in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. You will engage with the politics of education and children’s imaginative reading in the wake of the French Revolution (1789). Authors studied include William Wordsworth, William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and many more important writers of the period. This module encompasses a range of significant literature of the period, including poetry, prose, novels, and children’s literature.

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EL6013 -

Violent Femmes: Women in Post-war Popular Culture (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will examine the figure of the active female hero within popular fiction, film and television since the Second World War. Beginning in the 1950s with figures on screen such as Calamity Jane, the module will offer a selective survey of such representations through the 60s, 70s, 80s and so on. You will examine each example within the context of its form (ie film, television, popular fiction) and within the context of ongoing debates about the position and role of women in Britain and North America.

During the module you will become familiar with contemporary debates regarding the politics of gendered behaviours, engaging with feminist theory, film and television studies, cultural studies and literary theory. While the module will focus on the representation of women, discussion will also inevitably address relevant accounts of masculinity, sexuality and ethnicity.

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EL6016 -

Neo-Victorianism: Contemporary Literature and Culture (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module, you will learn about how the Victorian period is presented in an interdisciplinary range of texts, from film, graphic novels, theatre and contemporary fiction. You will examine the notion of ‘Neo-Victorianism’ in the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries. from the 1960s to the present, and you will learn why the Victorian period still holds such a fascination in literature and popular culture. We will also study several key theoretical areas: feminism, lesbianism and women’s writing; postcolonialism and Empire; postmodernist rewrites, reinterpretations and intertextuality; nostalgia and its effects in literature and the wider society; technology and travel; the interaction of the visual and the written text.

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EL6017 -

History, Myth, Narrative: Prose Writing about the First World War (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will explore a selection of key prose texts (novels and short stories) about the First World War that were written between 1914 and the present day. You will relate these novels and short stories to a range of influential critical ideas across literary studies and history. The module will help you to understand the close links between literary writing about the war and the way the war has been remembered in Britain at different points in time and will develop your research skills beyond your own discipline by allowing you to engage with scholarly concepts and sources in history, psychology and sociology. By reading a range of autobiographical and fictional prose texts, you will think about the value of literary texts as sources of cultural history, and you will investigate the changing historical contexts in which these texts have been produced, published and read. Themes and topics you will cover include the representation of soldiers, enemies and allies, class and gender in war writing, formal and publishing aspects and memory and remembrance.

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EL6018 -

The Black Atlantic: Literature, Slavery and Race (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to a range of texts which have been created out of, or about, the experience of African peoples in the diaspora from the seventeenth century to the present. It will encourage you to relate your understanding of the texts to the cultural and historical background from which they developed. Following on from level four core modules this module will develop your understanding of the concept of the ‘Atlantic World’ and theories of local, national and global cultures as well as theories of race and postcolonial theory. You will be encouraged to recognise the activity of the slave trade as the beginning point of the Atlantic World as an imagined space that challenges national and chronological boundaries and speaks of the powerful and enduring legacies of slavery.

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EL6019 -

Writing the Body 1800-1900 (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module you will learn that he body is a crucial, if often overlooked element in all literature, whether it be in terms of sexuality, gender, representations of glamorous diseases -such as consumption in the nineteenth century - or the final fate of the body, death. This module aims to introduce students to some of the major forms of the representation of the body in the literature in the period 1800-1900. Through such major authors as Jane Austen, Emily Bronte, Walt Whitman, Edgar Allan Poe and Hermann Melville, the module will investigate how certain genres (romance and gothic, for example) construct certain versions of the body, how different sexual bodies are depicted and contested, and how male and female bodies are differentiated and politicised.

As well as being introduced to relevant literary content in the period you will also learn how to research and generate new literary content via contemporary research methods using on-line resources such as full-text databases (LION etc). As well as finding your own material (a poem on the female body, for example), you will learn how to contextualise it (investigating the author and genre, for example).

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EL6020 -

Boxing with Byron: Romanticism and Popular Culture (Optional, 20 Credits)

The Romantic period (1789-1832) was a time of revolutionary change in literature, yet the literature of the period is typically represented by a narrow list of elite poets. On this module you will learn about a much more diverse range of writing: by men and women, by the poor and the rich, and taking in styles from satirical poetry, to advertising, to magazine fiction, to essays about opium addiction. Is there a distinction between ‘high’ and ‘popular’ culture, and who gets to decide the answer? This was a question the Romantics asked, and it is one you will learn to answer. You will also learn to investigate the diverse range of literature produced in the period yourself by using e-resources to find texts from the period that you think are valuable. You will develop an enhanced knowledge of the literature and culture of the period and as a result you will learn to question the way that literary critics tell stories about who and what should count in literary history.

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EL6021 -

Shaking up Shakespeare (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module develops your awareness and understanding of post-Renaissance adaptations and appropriations of Shakespeare’s work, from the seventeenth century to the present day. It engages with Shakespearean adaptations belonging to different literary genres (in particular, drama and prose fiction) and different media (written texts, films). It examines the ways in which selected Shakespearean texts are transformed in subsequent adaptations, and the issues underpinning these transformations, especially those concerning race, gender, and class. It also engages with theoretical debates surrounding authorship, literary value, canonicity, and popular/high culture.

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EL6023 -

Entertaining Satan (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module offers you an opportunity to look in depth at a range of literature and literary forms concerned with demonology, witchcraft and the representation of the devil and devil worship in poetry, prose and drama from c.1590-1678. It does so through the examination of key texts and themes in their historical context across a century of unprecedented political, social and cultural upheaval. Themes include religious fanaticism and fundamentalism, science, gender, social status and the beginnings of the English Enlightenment in its European context. All of these texts investigate and interrogate debates about the role of science and magic, moral authority and the nature of good and evil that apply to the tumultuous time in which they were written and that remain highly relevant today.

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EL6024 -

English Language Dissertation (Optional, 40 Credits)

This module will offer you the opportunity to complete a large scale independent research project (10,000 words) on an English Language or Linguistics topic of your choice. You will learn how to plan, manage and organise a large scale research project; how to identify suitable research questions and methods; how to apply these methods appropriately to primary and/or secondary materials; and how to structure and write a sustained academic argument, following academic conventions appropriate to the discipline.

In designing and implementing your research project, you will draw on skills and knowledge developed during the programme. The dissertation will allow you to work independently, drawing on the advice and guidance of a designated supervisor.

Students will develop abilities that are highly valued by employers. These include the abilities to think and work systematically and independently, to interpret data and arguments, and to communicate coherently verbally and in writing.
Throughout your dissertation project, you will therefore draw upon, and, in your final submission demonstrate, key transferable skills which are essential for employment in the contemporary world, ranging from intellectual, to organisational, to communication skills.

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EL6027 -

Second Language Acquisition (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will develop your awareness and understanding of the field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA) through the study of central themes: age and SLA, individual differences in SLA, and similarities and differences between first and second language acquisition processes. As such, you will also pay particular attention to current issues and debates within the field, most especially in terms of the findings of recent empirical research investigating social and contextual perspectives to the study of SLA.

You will critically analyse, by means of lecture input and classroom discussion, the main influential theories and most important research findings in SLA. You will also focus upon different approaches to conducting empirical research in second language acquisition. Throughout the module, you will evaluate the many varied perspectives regarding second language learning which you encounter, and establish your own view of and position within these debates, developing your ability to present your own viewpoint, both in speech and in writing, key skills for the world of work

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EL6028 -

The origins and evolution of language (Optional, 20 Credits)

In addition to linguistics, this module brings together ideas from evolutionary biology, palaeontology and its subgroup palaeobiology, anthropology, physiology, neuroscience, genetics, primatology and computer science. Evidence from these and other sources is used to understand when and why language emerged in our ancestors.

The module starts with a very brief overview of the Western philosophical context in which debates over language are embedded. This context is used to examine how different linguists in the twentieth century approached the study of language, and the issue of whether language is a social or a cognitive (an external or an internal) phenomenon. We then look at theories of evolution and hypotheses concerning hominin phylogeny (i.e. Homo sapiens and all the ancestral species since our split from the last common ancestor with any extant species ). Turning to the actual evolution of language, we examine comparative data from other animal communication systems and the cognitive and physiological pre-requisites that are necessary for language. The final part of the module focuses on theories of language evolution, and in particular the debate between nativist and non-nativist accounts of language.

Throughout the module, you will evaluate the many varied perspectives on language evolution which you encounter, and establish your own view of and position within these debates, developing your ability to present your own viewpoint in speech and in writing.

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EL6029 -

World Englishes (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will examine the role of English in the world today, as you learn about the development of English as a world language and also as a language which has many global and local varieties.

You will develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the historical, social and political contexts of the global expansion and development of English and Englishes, and will explore types of variation across Englishes (variation across time, places and spaces). You will examine the emergence of new standard Englishes, and further develop your understanding of the debates surrounding standard language ideology. You will also explore the internationalisation and globalisation of English, examining the ways in which English is ‘marketed’ as the language of opportunity, but also acts as a ‘gatekeeper’ in our contemporary globalized world. You will examine the role of world Englishes in language death, and discuss possible future scenarios for new and world Englishes.

Throughout the module, you will evaluate the many varied perspectives about English which you encounter, and establish your own view of and position within these debates, developing your ability to present your own viewpoint in speech and in writing – a key employability skill.

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EL6030 -

Language Variation in the British Isles (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the major variations of accent and dialect found in the English language as spoken in the British Isles. You will consider in detail how certain of these can be described, as well as considering the question of the standard forms against which variations are measured, and the influences of modern media and communications. You will also have the opportunity to improve your skills in phonemic and phonetic transcription, and revisit certain suprasegmental features and aspects of connected speech, considering these as supplements to the description of accents.

Throughout the module, you will consider numerous recorded samples of spoken English, investigating these under the guidance of your tutor, with each lecture and seminar having direct relevance to your module assessment, which takes the form of a case study of the accent and dialect of an individual speaker (or possibly more than one speaker), chosen by you. Thus, the case-study assessment develops directly your ability to plan and undertake projects under guidance, a key skill for the world of work.

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EL6032 -

Variation, Change and Corpus Linguistics (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module, you will learn how to use recently developed corpora of written or spoken language to investigate patterns of grammatical variation and/or change. You will learn what a corpus is, and the research skills necessary to use it. These skills including how to identify research questions and hypotheses, how to select research methods appropriate to particular hypotheses (including qualitative and quantitative approaches to corpus data), how to select and evaluate appropriate sources of corpus data, how to extract relevant data from the corpus to test a research hypothesis, and how to interpret those data in the light of theories of language variation and change. Through the practical experience of using corpora you will gain on this module, you will learn about the issues involved in conducting this kind of research, so that you will be able to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of particular research techniques, methods or strategies that are applied within corpus studies of language variation and change Not only will this enable you to see how research in this field is conducted, it will provide you with opportunities to develop key transferable skills in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of large datasets, the interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data (particularly quantitative reasoning skills), the use of computerised databases and tools for statistical analysis, and the presentation of research data and analysis both verbally and in writing. Working in small groups will enhance your abilities to collaborate with others, to justify and take decisions, to manage a research project and to work independently.

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EL6034 -

(Critical) Discourse Analysis (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module, you will extend your knowledge of discourse analysis in relation to the construction of ideological meaning in discourse. The module draws in particular on the framework of Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG), including its extension in Multimodality and Appraisal Theory, and seeks to apply the tools of SFG to (Critical) Discourse Analysis .

In undertaking the module, you will develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the historical, social and political contexts in which texts are produced and consumed. Using the tools of analysis acquired in the module, you will also be given the opportunity to analyse a selection of texts on issues in the public domain around the time of studying. Analyses will focus on (a) how speakers/writers represent situations and events, (b) how they position themselves with respect to the situations and events they describe, and (c) how they organise discourse. You will also examine and critically reflect upon how discourse reflects ideology at every level. In this way, you will come to understand and evaluate a number of perspectives about the discourses you encounter, and establish your own view of and position within these debates, developing your ability to present your own viewpoint in speech and in writing.

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EL6042 -

Postwar US Writing (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will enhance your understanding of postwar American literary culture in its broader social, political, and
economic contexts. Mid-century America was a time of profound contradictions: while US citizens lived under the shadow the bomb, many experienced unprecedented economic prosperity and access to new material comforts. We will explore how national paranoia
about the spread of communism and the nuclear arms race sat alongside – and fed into – the postwar image of the American ‘good life’, an image of suburban conformity underpinned by the growth of advertising and consumer culture. We will consider how postwar fiction and poetry challenges this demand for conformity in both content and form: through its complex representations of the American cold war experience and its innovative narrative and poetic strategies. The texts on this module offer insights into postwar attitudes towards a diverse range of topics, including national and international politics, work, leisure, and domesticity, gender and sexuality, and race and ethnicity.

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EL6045 -

Political Drama in Early Modern England (Optional, 20 Credits)

People thought and wrote about politics a lot in the early modern period. Just like today, lives and livelihoods hinged upon the attitudes, loyalties and alliances of those in power – and the theatre was a convenient and accessible place to think about (and sometimes to poke fun at) political figureheads and their ideologies. Also, because men like William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson were, effectively, on the payroll of some of England’s wealthiest and most powerful men and women, their dramatic writings often carried distinct political agendas. Monarchs like Queen Elizabeth I and James VI/I were passionate about literature, and London’s best playwrights and acting companies were employed during their lavish coronation processions – and invited to perform at court during annual festivities. Drama from this period was not only influenced by politics, moreover, it had influential political clout, in and of itself. The theatre explored, explained, critiqued, and shaped political attitudes and ideas – at every level of society.

Building on your reading of early modern authors at levels 4 and 5 in early modern literature, this module will challenge you to read a range of Tudor and Jacobean plays in relation to political change, scandal, and satire. You will develop a specialised understanding of the relationship between literature and politics, and a detailed knowledge of the early modern period’s tumultuous social and religious contexts.

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EL6047 -

Twenty First Century Literature: Writing in the Present (Optional, 20 Credits)

From Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (1985) and its popular television adaptation (2017) to Yorgos Lanthimos’ film The Lobster (2015), this module invites you to explore a wide and diverse range of novels, short stories and other media in order to promote and analyse the study of contemporary theoretical debates on gender, love, the body and sexuality.

Through the theoretical lens of feminism, psychoanalysis, queer theory and postmodernism, the module aims to develop your critical thinking and your existing knowledge of literature, film and television, from 1985 to the present day. It will encourage you to explore the complex issues raised by diverse critical theory and close analysis of a range of late twentieth and twenty-first century literature, film and television adaptation. By doing so, you will reflect on the ways that twenty-first literature and other media engages with, interrogates and often offers alternative narratives on present debates about gender, love, the body and sexuality.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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