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Do you want to explore the treasures of literature while also training yourself as a writer? This flexible course will enable you to do both at the same time. Learning within a strongly creative community, you’ll be set for an intellectually stimulating experience that also develops valuable transferable skills.

In Literature modules you will cover topics from Shakespeare to contemporary fiction, fostering your appreciation, understanding and enjoyment of literary texts. You will produce independent interpretations of texts and concepts, and share your insights with others confidently.

In Creative Writing modules you will hone your craft as a writer with an emphasis on voice, structure and critical reflection. Workshops will allow you to reflect on your practice as you develop your own creative projects.

The course combines academic rigour with a concern for employability skills such as communication and analysis. 

Northumbria University is ranked 15th in English & Creative Writing in the UK (Guardian University League Tables 2020).

96% of students were satisfied with the resources available on this course (National Student Survey, 2018).

Course Information

UCAS Code
QW38

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Humanities

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019 or September 2020

Fee Information

Module Information

Department / Humanities

Our Department of Humanities includes the subject areas of History, English Literature, English Language and Linguistics, Creative Writing and American Studies.

Humanities Video Gallery

Discover more about what you will learn on the course, more about our academics research interests, and hear from current students by watching our videos.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature and Creative Writing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Your tutors will use a variety of teaching methods including lectures, seminars, writing workshops and individual tutorials. These are backed up by a well-designed support system that ensures you have a successful learning journey in each academic year. You will not only receive extensive feedback but also ‘feed-forward’ as we work with you to explore how you can keep improving on previous work. Tutors are very approachable and 93% of students find it’s easy to contact staff when needed, according to the National Student Survey 2015.

Our assessment strategy is designed to support student-centred learning, based on our understanding that everyone has different needs, strengths and enthusiasms. Assessment methods are engaging and diverse, including portfolios of creative work, reflective commentaries on your creative practice, presentations, essays, exams, critical reviews, and even blogs.

A wide range of option modules are offered on this course. To ensure the quality of the student learning experience, some modules are subject to minimum and maximum student numbers.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature and Creative Writing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

English at Northumbria enjoys international recognition for the quality of teaching and research, and our modules are routinely praised by external examiners. Our publications in English and Creative Writing are ranked 15th in the country for their quality, by the 2014 Research Excellence Framework. Our staff actively explore and shape what literary studies mean in the 21st century, and our expertise and enthusiasm feed directly into what we teach.

Creative Writing is both researched and practised at Northumbria and our team includes award-winning novelist and poets, who are major figures in their field. Furthermore, through our partnership with New Writing North, the foremost literary promotion agency in the north of England, we give you opportunities to meet and learn from agents, publishers, and writers from across the country.

 

Book an Open Day / Experience English literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature and Creative Writing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) is embedded throughout the course with tools such as the ‘Blackboard’ eLearning Portal and electronic reading lists that will guide your preparation for seminars and independent research. The use of TEL enables us to ‘flip’ our classrooms where appropriate, so that contact time is focused on answering questions and applying what you have already learnt.

The 24/7 University Library achieves some of the highest levels of student satisfaction in the UK and has held the Cabinet Office accreditation for Customer Service Excellence since 2010.

There are over half a million print books and another 500,000 electronic books available online. Further facilities, including a resource room, specialist computing equipment and interview rooms, are available at the Institute for the Humanities, in the University’s Lipman Building.

 

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature and Creative Writing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

At Northumbria your learning will be directly impacted by the teaching team’s passion for their subjects, which has enabled the University to climb into the UK’s top 30 for research power in English Literature and Creative Writing.

As part of the strong research-rich ethos, you will build up your own research skills as you formulate questions, critique different interpretations, and develop well-founded arguments. In your first year you will be introduced to enquiry-based learning, engaging critically with research in seminars and assessments. In your second year there is increased focus on starting to conduct your own research. In the final year you will undertake either a dissertation or a major creative project. Whichever you choose, you will be expected to demonstrate independent learning, academic rigour, self-directed purpose and intellectual ambition.

 

Book an Open Day / Experience English Literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature and Creative Writing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

During your time at Northumbria you can gain experience as a writer or editor at ‘The Edge’, our student magazine. Also, the University has a close relationship with the writing agency, New Writing North, and there are frequently internship opportunities for Creative Writing students and graduates.

In the second year you will have the option of studying in another country. North America and mainland Europe are popular places for students to spend a semester, taking modules that will count towards their final degree. This type of international experience will give you an extra edge in the jobs market.

In the final year there is the option to undertake a module entitled ‘Enterprise and Writing’ which introduces you to the world of writing and publishing by introducing you to agents, publishers, and up-and-coming new writers, who share their experiences with you.

Throughout your studies the personal guidance programme will engage you in one-to-one and group workshops on employability. In addition, the University’s Careers and Employment Service will offer a range of workshops, one-to-one advice, and networking opportunities.

 

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature and Creative Writing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

With highly honed skills in communication and analysis, you will be ready to hit the ground running once you start a career. 90% of our graduates are employed or in further study within six months of finishing the course (Unistats 2015). There are logical career paths into writing, publishing, media, communications and advertising, but frequently our graduates also use their transferable skills to work in business, law and teaching, or to undertake postgraduate study.

Whatever you decide to do, you will have strong employability as a result of having acquired the characteristics of a Northumbria graduate. These include critical reflection and self-learning, collaboration and curiosity, and the ability to apply your knowledge to solve problems in ways that are sustainable and ethical.

Book an Open Day / Experience English Literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study English Literature and Creative Writing. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Who would this Course suit?

This dynamic and exciting course will appeal to anyone with a passion for reading and writing. You’ll respond to canonical and contemporary literature (from Shakespeare to the present), while also developing your skills as a creative writer through different genres. You will also have the option of studying for a semester in the USA or Europe. We provide you with the key skills to prepare you for the job market: our contacts with industry professionals, locally, regionally, and nationally, offer you a unique insight into professionalising your creative practice. 

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 units at Distinction and 27 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A level.

 

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1: TBC

International Fee in Year 1: TBC

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Scholarships and Discounts

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

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Modules Overview 2019/20

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

EL4001 -

Introduction to Literary Studies (Core,20 Credits)

You will be given the opportunity to familiarise yourself with conceptual issues such as canonicity, the unconscious, the tragic, the nature of the author, gender and postmodernity. Lectures will introduce you to these concepts and modes of applying these to literary texts as well as introducing you to new material in the texts themselves. Seminars will follow the lectures, where you will discuss and explore with your tutor and with your fellow students both the texts and their historical and theoretical contexts.

More information

EL4004 -

Reading Poetry (Core,20 Credits)

This module encourages you to read and enjoy poetry whilst also developing your understanding of how figurative language, linguistic choice and formal technique work to produce the meanings that we derive from poetry. The module is structured to help you develop competence in close reading of literary texts and to increase your familiarity with the critical vocabulary that will enable you to discuss and analyse poetic language in an informed manner. You will also be encouraged to increase your awareness of the diverse nature of poetic composition and to recognise the importance of genre, context and form in the reading of poetic language. Working on the principle that close reading is an essential part of critical analysis of any text, the module provides a foundation for all subsequent elements of your studies in English Literature. Moreover, because these skills in understanding poetry are an essential first step in creating it, the module seeks to foster an understanding of the creative process that will improve your familiarity with poetic technique and thus help to develop your creative skills. The module elides the gap between the creative and critical spheres and in so doing enrich both.

More information

EL4014 -

Story (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of narration. Semester 1 mainly focuses on the structure and techniques of prose fiction. In Semester 2 this is broadened to a wider range of narrative forms, including script. Students will be introduced to a variety of basic key skills related to storytelling, will learn to appreciate the demands of different narrative genres, and will develop an understanding of the nature of story and narrative. This will provide students with a basic framework to underpin the development of their writing practice.

More information

EL4015 -

Creative and Critical Practice (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn the habit and discipline of sitting down to write regularly. You will also learn key techniques of prose fiction writing, writerly reflection and critical writing. In particular, you will engage in a range of ‘textual interventions’ that encourage you to explore how other writers write and how you can develop your own writing voice through engagement with that of others. In this way you will also learn to relate critical study of literary texts to writing practice.

More information

EL4016 -

Talking Texts (Core,20 Credits)

This module offers students a forum to develop academic skills in close reading and analysis. A range of texts are examined within a reading-focussed workshop, including: the novel, short stories, poetry, plays, journalism, academic essays and online media such as blogs and flash fiction. Students are exposed to a range of writing in order to consider and develop their own reading practices. The discursive workshops develop speaking, listening, and critical skills through participation in classroom activities. The module prepares students for work at degree level, encouraging them to become independent learners in a supportive environment.

More information

EL4017 -

Gothic Stories: Nineteenth Century to the Present (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will be given the opportunity to study a range of gothic texts from the nineteenth century to the contemporary period. This will provide you with the opportunity to explore the conventions of the genre as well as some of the ways in which gothic writing reflects and/or questions assumptions about race, gender, social class and sexuality. You will learn about the cultural significance of many familiar gothic motifs and figures such as ghosts, uncanny doubles, haunted houses and vampires.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5012 -

Humanities Study Abroad (40 credit) (Optional,40 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is a semester based 40 credit module which is available on degree courses which facilitate study abroad within the programme. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be constructed to meet the learning outcomes for the programme for the semester in question, dependent on suitable modules from the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). The module will be assessed by conversion of graded marks from the host University.

Learning outcomes on the year-long modules on which the student is unable to attend the home institution must be met at the host institution, and marks from the host are incorporated into the modules as part of the overall assessment.

More information

EL5003 -

Early Modern Cultures (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn to read texts written in the period 1500-1700 historically. Lectures and seminars will encourage you to learn about the early modern period, and to situate texts by authors such as William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas More, and Philip Sidney. You will learn about poetry, prose, and drama – situating literary genres from the period in relation to themes that include: class, race, sexuality, politics, authority, gender, and ideas of literary production itself. Lectures will trace the afterlives of some of the most influential texts ever written, and will encourage you to read these textual traditions in light of a range of western literary ideologies.

Building upon work completed at Level 4 on early modern authors like Shakespeare and Donne, this module offers students a more comprehensive survey of the early modern period. Encouraging students to read literature historically, Early Modern Cultures fosters key skills in tutor-led and independent reading and research that will complement a range of studies at level 6.

More information

EL5004 -

Modernism and Modernity (Core,20 Credits)

Through this module you will gain an understanding of the relation between literary modernism and modernity in the early part of the twentieth century. The module provides you with conceptual and historical frameworks for understanding the relation between art and social life. It gives you an opportunity to engage with the ways in which different literary genres prompted modernist experiments in form and with the various debates taking place between literary critics, writers, philosophers and cultural historians in early-twentieth-century Britain and the USA.

More information

EL5021 -

Creative Reflection (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will develop an appreciation of some of the ways your writing benefits from critical reflection and enquiry. You will learn to produce work whose creative and critical elements support and enhance each other. In addition you will develop creative skills introduced at Level 4 which will prepare you for further study at Level 6.

More information

EL5022 -

Thinking About Voice (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of voice as applied to creative writing. You will learn about technical aspects of voice in creative writing, e.g. the concepts of register and free indirect discourse. You will also learn about the wider notion of developing an individual creative voice, i.e. the expression of subjectivity, and the importance of originality. You will learn about the way that tone is deployed in different types of writing, and you will learn about the imaginative use of language. All of this will give you tools that you can utilise in your own creative work.

More information

EL5023 -

Working With Structure (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of structure as applied to narrative forms (fiction, script) and poetry. Students will read and analyse a range of creative texts employing diverse formal structures. Through experimentation, they will make use of these formal structures in their own creative work. They will learn about both the limits and the opportunities offered by different structures in narrative forms and in poetry.

More information

EL5026 -

Literary Revolutions, Eighteenth Century to Romanticism (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will study a range of texts from the eighteenth century to the Romantic period. The module considers a period in which literature and culture witnessed a succession of revolutionary changes. The novel emerged as a new form; female writers and readers took on a new prominence; the print market expanded enormously; and writers responded to the seismic changes in society caused by a period of war, imperial expansion, and political and social revolution. You will study a diverse and unusual range of texts that emerged from this period, and learn how to link the texts to the period’s context.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5009 -

Humanities Work Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks. You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AD5010 -

Humanities Study Abroad Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AT5004 -

Year in International Business (This is made up of 5 modules studied in Newcastle (Semester 1) & Amsterdam (Semester 2) (Optional,120 Credits)

This overarching module descriptor covers the Year in International Business which is made up of 5 modules which students study in Newcastle (semester 1) and Amsterdam (semester 2).

This additional year of studies has been designed to develop students’ business awareness and their soft skills through a semester of study in the UK followed by engagement in studying in Amsterdam and working on real business projects to further enhance and develop this knowledge, skills and attributes.

Semester 1 in the UK comprises three 20-credit modules aimed at students new to business and management, which also equips the students for a semester in Amsterdam, working in teams on a “real-world”, client facing project. Of the modules studies in Semester 1 provide students with the “soft”, “analytical” and “project management” skills necessary to embark on a “real-world” client-centred consultancy project in Semester 2. In Semester 2, students will work move to Amsterdam and study two modules on Northumbria licensed premises. The first module, Group Business Consultancy Project, is a Level 5 40 credit Consultancy Project providing a supported and challenging experience with real business supervised by Northumbria and possibly Dutch academics. The final module complements the development of business knowledge and application through a contextualised consideration of International Business. This will also add to the Business Consultancy experience, thereby guaranteeing a coherent business experience.

The modules are outlined below:

Semester 1
HR9505 Managing People at Work (20 credits)
SM9511 Global Business Environment (20 credits)
AF5022 Financial Decision Making (20 credits)

Semester 2
AT5000 Digital Business (20)
AT5001 Group Business Consultancy Project (40 credits)

In semester 1, students will learn in an environment aligned to that of business students on full time programmes. A mixture of large group and small group sessions will take place. In semester 2, in accordance with the experiential learning pedagogical approach in the Business Clinic operated at Newcastle Business School, the group consultancy work will involve students working in groups, facilitated by academics but also independently and amongst their peers in collaborative project work to provide real business consultancy. Assessment has been developed in accordance with Northumbria’s Assessment for Learning principles including a broad mix of assessment appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed and with opportunities for formative feedback.

A student who passes all modules will, on successful completion of their undergraduate programme of study, have the title “(Year in International Business UK and Amsterdam)” added to their degree award title. Students who do not pass 120 credits will have those modules that have been completed recorded on their transcript.

More information

EL6001 -

English Dissertation (Optional,40 Credits)

In your third year you will be ready to become an independent thinker and researcher. The dissertation is your opportunity to research and write a substantial investigation of a topic that you are really passionate about. Your tutors will support you as you learn how to work independently and to manage a large project. You will also learn project-management, research, presentation and writing skills. You will learn to be self-motivated and independent. By the end of the module you will have produced a major piece of work that you can be proud of, and you will be ready to continue as an independent thinker in further study or in the graduate job you go on to at the end of your third year.

More information

EL6002 -

Alternative Worlds: Utopian Dreams and Dystopian Nightmares (Optional,20 Credits)

This module examines a selection of utopian and dystopian fiction of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It provides an interesting area for you to apply and further develop critical theories explored in level 4 and 5 modules (especially those concerning gender, class, and ethnicity) through an examination of a challenging genre that embraces the complex field of non-realist representation, science fiction, satire and social commentary, prediction, politics and polemic. Some of the issues on which the module focuses include evolution, progress, eugenics, genetics, man and machine, alternative histories, apocalypse, ‘racial’ and gendered identities and conflicts. The module also aims to explore genre definitions and limitations, particularly the divide between utopian and dystopian fiction.

More information

EL6004 -

Vamps and Virgins: Gothic Sexualities (Optional,20 Credits)

From Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Christabel (1816) to Alan Ball’s True Blood (2008-), this module invites you to explore the dark, shadowy world of the Gothic in relation to a diverse range of literary texts and modern media. Combining the study of familiar canonical fictions with new and challenging material, we will train our focus on the enigmatic figure of the vampire, examining its various transitions and developments through the lens of critical and cultural theory.

Through an analysis of the Gothic, the module aims to develop your critical thinking, as well as your existing knowledge of literature, film, and television dating from 1816 to the present day. In doing so, it will encourage you to reflect on and interrogate the complex ways in which Gothic texts engage with, and intervene in, broader cultural debates about gender and sexuality.

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EL6007 -

Sin, Sex, and Violence: Marlowe in Context (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will enhance your awareness and appreciation of one of the most controversial and stimulating authors of the early modern period (and beyond!), Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593). Marlowe wrote plays and poems that expose our darkest hearts, showing characters lusting for power, and each other. Building on your brief contact with Marlowe at Level 5, this module will offer a chronological survey of his short but staggering career, situating each of his works in relation to the tumultuous contexts of their production and reception, including later appropriations. This will involve looking at Marlowe in relation to discussions of early modern politics, religious conflict, sexuality, urbanisation, imperialism, science and magic, ethnicity, geography, and historiography. The module therefore offers a unique opportunity to see how one writer’s remarkable career developed.

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EL6009 -

Romanticism and Childhood (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will inform you about the transformations to the concept of childhood that occurred in the Romantic period (1760-1830). It will challenge you to analyse various celebrated representations of children and childhood in British Romantic literature. A new and distinctive attitude towards childhood was a core element of Romantic culture. Many British Romantic writers were invested in such issues as children’s education, imaginative fantasy literature, child-psychology, social injustices afflicting children, and religious questions of childhood innocence. This module will encourage you to develop an historical awareness of the changing culture of childhood in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. You will engage with the politics of education and children’s imaginative reading in the wake of the French Revolution (1789). Authors studied include William Wordsworth, William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and many more important writers of the period. This module encompasses a range of significant literature of the period, including poetry, prose, novels, and children’s literature.

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EL6016 -

Neo-Victorianism: Contemporary Literature and Culture (Optional,20 Credits)

On this module, you will learn about how the Victorian period is presented in an interdisciplinary range of texts, from film, graphic novels, theatre and contemporary fiction. You will examine the notion of ‘Neo-Victorianism’ in the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries. from the 1960s to the present, and you will learn why the Victorian period still holds such a fascination in literature and popular culture. We will also study several key theoretical areas: feminism, lesbianism and women’s writing; postcolonialism and Empire; postmodernist rewrites, reinterpretations and intertextuality; nostalgia and its effects in literature and the wider society; technology and travel; the interaction of the visual and the written text.

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EL6018 -

The Black Atlantic: Literature, Slavery and Race (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to a range of texts which have been created out of, or about, the experience of African peoples in the diaspora from the seventeenth century to the present. It will encourage you to relate your understanding of the texts to the cultural and historical background from which they developed. Following on from level four core modules this module will develop your understanding of the concept of the ‘Atlantic World’ and theories of local, national and global cultures as well as theories of race and postcolonial theory. You will be encouraged to recognise the activity of the slave trade as the beginning point of the Atlantic World as an imagined space that challenges national and chronological boundaries and speaks of the powerful and enduring legacies of slavery.

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EL6023 -

Entertaining Satan (Optional,20 Credits)

This module offers you an opportunity to look in depth at a range of literature and literary forms concerned with demonology, witchcraft and the representation of the devil and devil worship in poetry, prose and drama from c.1590-1678. It does so through the examination of key texts and themes in their historical context across a century of unprecedented political, social and cultural upheaval. Themes include religious fanaticism and fundamentalism, science, gender, social status and the beginnings of the English Enlightenment in its European context. All of these texts investigate and interrogate debates about the role of science and magic, moral authority and the nature of good and evil that apply to the tumultuous time in which they were written and that remain highly relevant today.

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EL6035 -

Creative Writing Project (Optional,40 Credits)

This module provides an opportunity to undertake a sustained, large-scale writing project as the culmination of your degree. It allows you to demonstrate both creative skill and the ability to reflect critically on your creative writing practice.

You will undertake a Creative Writing Project of 8,000 words of prose fiction or 300 lines of poetry. Your creative writing project may take any form that is agreed by the project supervisor, but in most cases will be:
• A collection of poetry;
• A collection of short stories;
• A novella;
• Part of a novel
As well as the creative work, you will submit a critical commentary reflecting on the project. The commentary must be 1,000-4,000 words. The creative work will be 4,000-7,000 words, so that together they make a total of not more than 8,000 words.
As well as the final project, you will give a formatively assessed presentation, and submit summatively assessed draft work, in semester 1.

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EL6039 -

Enterprise and Writing (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to give you an insight into enterprise and innovation in the writing industries and to give you an understanding of careers that may be open to you as a graduate in English and Creative Writing. Assessment is designed to develop your ability generate project proposals, to work as part of a team to develop ideas, to improve your presentation skills and to prepare and support you in the process of applying for internships, residencies, grants and other forms of employment in the creative industries.
An open and forward-looking view will be taken of where work opportunities for writers and those interested in working in the literary industries will be found in the future. Many standard business models will be interrogated to examine how the business of publishing and selling books is changing and what this is likely to mean for authors and those working in the sector in the future. A particular emphasis will be placed on the changes that digitalisation is making to traditional publishing models and to the changing roles of writers, agents and publishers

The module will cover the following:

• How to understand jobs in the sector
• Contact with professionals from the writing industries
• Preparing for working in the sector
• Managing yourself as a small business
• Managing a freelance and portfolio career
• Generating project ideas and producing projects

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EL6042 -

Postwar US Writing (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will enhance your understanding of postwar American literary culture in its broader social, political, and
economic contexts. Mid-century America was a time of profound contradictions: while US citizens lived under the shadow the bomb, many experienced unprecedented economic prosperity and access to new material comforts. We will explore how national paranoia
about the spread of communism and the nuclear arms race sat alongside – and fed into – the postwar image of the American ‘good life’, an image of suburban conformity underpinned by the growth of advertising and consumer culture. We will consider how postwar fiction and poetry challenges this demand for conformity in both content and form: through its complex representations of the American cold war experience and its innovative narrative and poetic strategies. The texts on this module offer insights into postwar attitudes towards a diverse range of topics, including national and international politics, work, leisure, and domesticity, gender and sexuality, and race and ethnicity.

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EL6044 -

Writing Fantasy and Science Fiction (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn how to use the key forms, approaches and techniques of fantasy and science fiction in your own writing. As you explore these genres by reading a range of classic and contemporary texts, you will develop a critical understanding of speculative fiction in theory and practice. You will answer questions such as:
• What is a fantasy or science fiction text?
• How can we read such texts productively?
• What writing strategies do they use?
• How can you produce exciting and original fantasy/science fiction writing yourself?

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EL6046 -

Advanced Creative Writing (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is designed for students with some experience in creative writing to further develop their skills in prose and/or poetry, with an emphasis of producing longer pieces of writing. The module will examine the nature of genre, and will explore structure in the novel, novella, short story cycle, long poem and poetic sequence.
Although the focus of the module is on your own writing, we will read and discuss a number of texts in order to improve technique and help you in planning and carrying out your project.
Seminars will run as creative writing workshops in which students respond to writing exercises and learn to offer and receive feedback on their own and others’ work.

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EL6047 -

Twenty First Century Literature: Writing in the Present (Optional,20 Credits)

From Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (1985) and its popular television adaptation (2017) to Yorgos Lanthimos’ film The Lobster (2015), this module invites you to explore a wide and diverse range of novels, short stories and other media in order to promote and analyse the study of contemporary theoretical debates on gender, love, the body and sexuality.

Through the theoretical lens of feminism, psychoanalysis, queer theory and postmodernism, the module aims to develop your critical thinking and your existing knowledge of literature, film and television, from 1985 to the present day. It will encourage you to explore the complex issues raised by diverse critical theory and close analysis of a range of late twentieth and twenty-first century literature, film and television adaptation. By doing so, you will reflect on the ways that twenty-first literature and other media engages with, interrogates and often offers alternative narratives on present debates about gender, love, the body and sexuality.

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EL6049 -

From Jane Austen to Austenland: Representing the Regency in Literature and Film (Optional,20 Credits)

The Regency (1810-1820) is condensed and complex period of contrasts; whilst precipitating significant and lasting changes in literature, art, theatre, fashion, and architecture, it was also a period that was beset by war, ruthless suppression of popular protest, sexual scandal, and the Regent himself was an object of contempt and ridicule. However, the Regency has come to be represented in popular culture as the lost and last age of romance and elegance, partly the result of enhanced connections being made between Austen and the heritage industries in modern adaptations. This module examines representations of the Regency in literature and film, beginning with the works of Jane Austen, all of which were published during this period.

We will begin with an introduction to the social, cultural and political issues of the period, and we will consider Austen as a writer of the Regency. We will move on to consider the significance of twentieth-century adaptations, imitations and appropriations of Austen and representations of the Regency in the works of historical novelists such as Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland, and more contemporary works such as Shannon Hale’s ‘Austenland’. We will also consider the proliferation of Austen and the Regency-based texts in the American market in relation to thinking about both as a form of heritage tourism and escapism. Overall, we will be exploring the impact of Austen upon popular culture, how popular culture fosters a reconsideration of Austen and how we engage with both in relation how we envision our cultural past.

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EL6051 -

Contemporary Genre Fiction (Optional,20 Credits)

This module explores contemporary (post-millennial) genres of fiction with an emphasis on their innovativeness, contemporaneity and their interaction with socio-cultural developments of the new millennium. You will engage with cutting edge texts to study their innovations in and interactions with the contemporary world. Module content will focus on theorizing relationships between audiences, genres and critics and will encourage you to view yourself as part of the process of re-defining contemporary genres in terms of themes, cultural contexts and theoretical models. Genres under discussion will include: millennial text, 9/11 literature, digital writings, post-apocalyptic, crunch lit, the new erotica, Nordic noir and Brexit literature. Module teaching will explore innovations in genres of the contemporary period, consider the challenges of new technologies and media, and examine the political, economic and cultural contexts of contemporary genres. Taking in a broad range of theoretical approaches – including late modernism, postmodernism, globalisation and post 9/11 theory – the module will critically engage with the extent to which C21 genre fictions actively shape our understanding of twenty-first century society.

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EL6055 -

Writing and Environment (Optional,20 Credits)

You will study a selection of texts, written from the eighteenth century to the present day, that engage with the natural environment in various ways. These include natural histories and popular science, pastoral and environmental poems, environmental protest literature, apocalyptic novels, and the ‘new nature writing’. You will learn how literary writers describe the world around them and how they use the natural world to articulate their own personal needs, feelings, and desires. You will study texts that draw attention both to natural beauty and to environmental catastrophe. You will learn how writers as diverse as Gilbert White, William Wordsworth, Charles Darwin, Rachel Carson, and Robert Macfarlane have changed the ways in which readers engage with the world around them. As part of your studies, you will learn to produce your own literary engagement with the natural world in a ‘creative field journal’, inspired by the writings of Charles Darwin, Robert Macfarlane, Amy Liptrott, and others. By the end of the module, you will have gained a sophisticated understanding not only of the ways that writers can change the world, but also how they can save it.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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Modules Overview 2020/21

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

EL4001 -

Introduction to Literary Studies (Core,20 Credits)

You will be given the opportunity to familiarise yourself with conceptual issues such as canonicity, the unconscious, the tragic, the nature of the author, gender and postmodernity. Lectures will introduce you to these concepts and modes of applying these to literary texts as well as introducing you to new material in the texts themselves. Seminars will follow the lectures, where you will discuss and explore with your tutor and with your fellow students both the texts and their historical and theoretical contexts.

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EL4004 -

Reading Poetry (Core,20 Credits)

This module encourages you to read and enjoy poetry whilst also developing your understanding of how figurative language, linguistic choice and formal technique work to produce the meanings that we derive from poetry. The module is structured to help you develop competence in close reading of literary texts and to increase your familiarity with the critical vocabulary that will enable you to discuss and analyse poetic language in an informed manner. You will also be encouraged to increase your awareness of the diverse nature of poetic composition and to recognise the importance of genre, context and form in the reading of poetic language. Working on the principle that close reading is an essential part of critical analysis of any text, the module provides a foundation for all subsequent elements of your studies in English Literature. Moreover, because these skills in understanding poetry are an essential first step in creating it, the module seeks to foster an understanding of the creative process that will improve your familiarity with poetic technique and thus help to develop your creative skills. The module elides the gap between the creative and critical spheres and in so doing enrich both.

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EL4014 -

Story (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of narration. Semester 1 mainly focuses on the structure and techniques of prose fiction. In Semester 2 this is broadened to a wider range of narrative forms, including script. Students will be introduced to a variety of basic key skills related to storytelling, will learn to appreciate the demands of different narrative genres, and will develop an understanding of the nature of story and narrative. This will provide students with a basic framework to underpin the development of their writing practice.

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EL4015 -

Creative and Critical Practice (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn the habit and discipline of sitting down to write regularly. You will also learn key techniques of prose fiction writing, writerly reflection and critical writing. In particular, you will engage in a range of ‘textual interventions’ that encourage you to explore how other writers write and how you can develop your own writing voice through engagement with that of others. In this way you will also learn to relate critical study of literary texts to writing practice.

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EL4016 -

Talking Texts (Core,20 Credits)

This module offers students a forum to develop academic skills in close reading and analysis. A range of texts are examined within a reading-focussed workshop, including: the novel, short stories, poetry, plays, journalism, academic essays and online media such as blogs and flash fiction. Students are exposed to a range of writing in order to consider and develop their own reading practices. The discursive workshops develop speaking, listening, and critical skills through participation in classroom activities. The module prepares students for work at degree level, encouraging them to become independent learners in a supportive environment.

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EL4017 -

Gothic Stories: Nineteenth Century to the Present (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will be given the opportunity to study a range of gothic texts from the nineteenth century to the contemporary period. This will provide you with the opportunity to explore the conventions of the genre as well as some of the ways in which gothic writing reflects and/or questions assumptions about race, gender, social class and sexuality. You will learn about the cultural significance of many familiar gothic motifs and figures such as ghosts, uncanny doubles, haunted houses and vampires.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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AD5012 -

Humanities Study Abroad (40 credit) (Optional,40 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is a semester based 40 credit module which is available on degree courses which facilitate study abroad within the programme. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be constructed to meet the learning outcomes for the programme for the semester in question, dependent on suitable modules from the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). The module will be assessed by conversion of graded marks from the host University.

Learning outcomes on the year-long modules on which the student is unable to attend the home institution must be met at the host institution, and marks from the host are incorporated into the modules as part of the overall assessment.

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EL5003 -

Early Modern Cultures (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn to read texts written in the period 1500-1700 historically. Lectures and seminars will encourage you to learn about the early modern period, and to situate texts by authors such as William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, Thomas More, and Philip Sidney. You will learn about poetry, prose, and drama – situating literary genres from the period in relation to themes that include: class, race, sexuality, politics, authority, gender, and ideas of literary production itself. Lectures will trace the afterlives of some of the most influential texts ever written, and will encourage you to read these textual traditions in light of a range of western literary ideologies.

Building upon work completed at Level 4 on early modern authors like Shakespeare and Donne, this module offers students a more comprehensive survey of the early modern period. Encouraging students to read literature historically, Early Modern Cultures fosters key skills in tutor-led and independent reading and research that will complement a range of studies at level 6.

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EL5004 -

Modernism and Modernity (Core,20 Credits)

Through this module you will gain an understanding of the relation between literary modernism and modernity in the early part of the twentieth century. The module provides you with conceptual and historical frameworks for understanding the relation between art and social life. It gives you an opportunity to engage with the ways in which different literary genres prompted modernist experiments in form and with the various debates taking place between literary critics, writers, philosophers and cultural historians in early-twentieth-century Britain and the USA.

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EL5021 -

Creative Reflection (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will develop an appreciation of some of the ways your writing benefits from critical reflection and enquiry. You will learn to produce work whose creative and critical elements support and enhance each other. In addition you will develop creative skills introduced at Level 4 which will prepare you for further study at Level 6.

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EL5022 -

Thinking About Voice (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of voice as applied to creative writing. You will learn about technical aspects of voice in creative writing, e.g. the concepts of register and free indirect discourse. You will also learn about the wider notion of developing an individual creative voice, i.e. the expression of subjectivity, and the importance of originality. You will learn about the way that tone is deployed in different types of writing, and you will learn about the imaginative use of language. All of this will give you tools that you can utilise in your own creative work.

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EL5023 -

Working With Structure (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces students to the core skills and ideas of structure as applied to narrative forms (fiction, script) and poetry. Students will read and analyse a range of creative texts employing diverse formal structures. Through experimentation, they will make use of these formal structures in their own creative work. They will learn about both the limits and the opportunities offered by different structures in narrative forms and in poetry.

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EL5026 -

Literary Revolutions, Eighteenth Century to Romanticism (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will study a range of texts from the eighteenth century to the Romantic period. The module considers a period in which literature and culture witnessed a succession of revolutionary changes. The novel emerged as a new form; female writers and readers took on a new prominence; the print market expanded enormously; and writers responded to the seismic changes in society caused by a period of war, imperial expansion, and political and social revolution. You will study a diverse and unusual range of texts that emerged from this period, and learn how to link the texts to the period’s context.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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AD5009 -

Humanities Work Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks. You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

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AD5010 -

Humanities Study Abroad Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

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AT5004 -

Year in International Business (This is made up of 5 modules studied in Newcastle (Semester 1) & Amsterdam (Semester 2) (Optional,120 Credits)

This overarching module descriptor covers the Year in International Business which is made up of 5 modules which students study in Newcastle (semester 1) and Amsterdam (semester 2).

This additional year of studies has been designed to develop students’ business awareness and their soft skills through a semester of study in the UK followed by engagement in studying in Amsterdam and working on real business projects to further enhance and develop this knowledge, skills and attributes.

Semester 1 in the UK comprises three 20-credit modules aimed at students new to business and management, which also equips the students for a semester in Amsterdam, working in teams on a “real-world”, client facing project. Of the modules studies in Semester 1 provide students with the “soft”, “analytical” and “project management” skills necessary to embark on a “real-world” client-centred consultancy project in Semester 2. In Semester 2, students will work move to Amsterdam and study two modules on Northumbria licensed premises. The first module, Group Business Consultancy Project, is a Level 5 40 credit Consultancy Project providing a supported and challenging experience with real business supervised by Northumbria and possibly Dutch academics. The final module complements the development of business knowledge and application through a contextualised consideration of International Business. This will also add to the Business Consultancy experience, thereby guaranteeing a coherent business experience.

The modules are outlined below:

Semester 1
HR9505 Managing People at Work (20 credits)
SM9511 Global Business Environment (20 credits)
AF5022 Financial Decision Making (20 credits)

Semester 2
AT5000 Digital Business (20)
AT5001 Group Business Consultancy Project (40 credits)

In semester 1, students will learn in an environment aligned to that of business students on full time programmes. A mixture of large group and small group sessions will take place. In semester 2, in accordance with the experiential learning pedagogical approach in the Business Clinic operated at Newcastle Business School, the group consultancy work will involve students working in groups, facilitated by academics but also independently and amongst their peers in collaborative project work to provide real business consultancy. Assessment has been developed in accordance with Northumbria’s Assessment for Learning principles including a broad mix of assessment appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed and with opportunities for formative feedback.

A student who passes all modules will, on successful completion of their undergraduate programme of study, have the title “(Year in International Business UK and Amsterdam)” added to their degree award title. Students who do not pass 120 credits will have those modules that have been completed recorded on their transcript.

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EL6001 -

English Dissertation (Optional,40 Credits)

In your third year you will be ready to become an independent thinker and researcher. The dissertation is your opportunity to research and write a substantial investigation of a topic that you are really passionate about. Your tutors will support you as you learn how to work independently and to manage a large project. You will also learn project-management, research, presentation and writing skills. You will learn to be self-motivated and independent. By the end of the module you will have produced a major piece of work that you can be proud of, and you will be ready to continue as an independent thinker in further study or in the graduate job you go on to at the end of your third year.

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EL6002 -

Alternative Worlds: Utopian Dreams and Dystopian Nightmares (Optional,20 Credits)

This module examines a selection of utopian and dystopian fiction of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It provides an interesting area for you to apply and further develop critical theories explored in level 4 and 5 modules (especially those concerning gender, class, and ethnicity) through an examination of a challenging genre that embraces the complex field of non-realist representation, science fiction, satire and social commentary, prediction, politics and polemic. Some of the issues on which the module focuses include evolution, progress, eugenics, genetics, man and machine, alternative histories, apocalypse, ‘racial’ and gendered identities and conflicts. The module also aims to explore genre definitions and limitations, particularly the divide between utopian and dystopian fiction.

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EL6004 -

Vamps and Virgins: Gothic Sexualities (Optional,20 Credits)

From Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Christabel (1816) to Alan Ball’s True Blood (2008-), this module invites you to explore the dark, shadowy world of the Gothic in relation to a diverse range of literary texts and modern media. Combining the study of familiar canonical fictions with new and challenging material, we will train our focus on the enigmatic figure of the vampire, examining its various transitions and developments through the lens of critical and cultural theory.

Through an analysis of the Gothic, the module aims to develop your critical thinking, as well as your existing knowledge of literature, film, and television dating from 1816 to the present day. In doing so, it will encourage you to reflect on and interrogate the complex ways in which Gothic texts engage with, and intervene in, broader cultural debates about gender and sexuality.

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EL6007 -

Sin, Sex, and Violence: Marlowe in Context (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will enhance your awareness and appreciation of one of the most controversial and stimulating authors of the early modern period (and beyond!), Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593). Marlowe wrote plays and poems that expose our darkest hearts, showing characters lusting for power, and each other. Building on your brief contact with Marlowe at Level 5, this module will offer a chronological survey of his short but staggering career, situating each of his works in relation to the tumultuous contexts of their production and reception, including later appropriations. This will involve looking at Marlowe in relation to discussions of early modern politics, religious conflict, sexuality, urbanisation, imperialism, science and magic, ethnicity, geography, and historiography. The module therefore offers a unique opportunity to see how one writer’s remarkable career developed.

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EL6009 -

Romanticism and Childhood (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will inform you about the transformations to the concept of childhood that occurred in the Romantic period (1760-1830). It will challenge you to analyse various celebrated representations of children and childhood in British Romantic literature. A new and distinctive attitude towards childhood was a core element of Romantic culture. Many British Romantic writers were invested in such issues as children’s education, imaginative fantasy literature, child-psychology, social injustices afflicting children, and religious questions of childhood innocence. This module will encourage you to develop an historical awareness of the changing culture of childhood in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. You will engage with the politics of education and children’s imaginative reading in the wake of the French Revolution (1789). Authors studied include William Wordsworth, William Blake, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Mary Shelley, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and many more important writers of the period. This module encompasses a range of significant literature of the period, including poetry, prose, novels, and children’s literature.

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EL6016 -

Neo-Victorianism: Contemporary Literature and Culture (Optional,20 Credits)

On this module, you will learn about how the Victorian period is presented in an interdisciplinary range of texts, from film, graphic novels, theatre and contemporary fiction. You will examine the notion of ‘Neo-Victorianism’ in the twentieth and the twenty-first centuries. from the 1960s to the present, and you will learn why the Victorian period still holds such a fascination in literature and popular culture. We will also study several key theoretical areas: feminism, lesbianism and women’s writing; postcolonialism and Empire; postmodernist rewrites, reinterpretations and intertextuality; nostalgia and its effects in literature and the wider society; technology and travel; the interaction of the visual and the written text.

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EL6018 -

The Black Atlantic: Literature, Slavery and Race (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to a range of texts which have been created out of, or about, the experience of African peoples in the diaspora from the seventeenth century to the present. It will encourage you to relate your understanding of the texts to the cultural and historical background from which they developed. Following on from level four core modules this module will develop your understanding of the concept of the ‘Atlantic World’ and theories of local, national and global cultures as well as theories of race and postcolonial theory. You will be encouraged to recognise the activity of the slave trade as the beginning point of the Atlantic World as an imagined space that challenges national and chronological boundaries and speaks of the powerful and enduring legacies of slavery.

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EL6023 -

Entertaining Satan (Optional,20 Credits)

This module offers you an opportunity to look in depth at a range of literature and literary forms concerned with demonology, witchcraft and the representation of the devil and devil worship in poetry, prose and drama from c.1590-1678. It does so through the examination of key texts and themes in their historical context across a century of unprecedented political, social and cultural upheaval. Themes include religious fanaticism and fundamentalism, science, gender, social status and the beginnings of the English Enlightenment in its European context. All of these texts investigate and interrogate debates about the role of science and magic, moral authority and the nature of good and evil that apply to the tumultuous time in which they were written and that remain highly relevant today.

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EL6035 -

Creative Writing Project (Optional,40 Credits)

This module provides an opportunity to undertake a sustained, large-scale writing project as the culmination of your degree. It allows you to demonstrate both creative skill and the ability to reflect critically on your creative writing practice.

You will undertake a Creative Writing Project of 8,000 words of prose fiction or 300 lines of poetry. Your creative writing project may take any form that is agreed by the project supervisor, but in most cases will be:
• A collection of poetry;
• A collection of short stories;
• A novella;
• Part of a novel
As well as the creative work, you will submit a critical commentary reflecting on the project. The commentary must be 1,000-4,000 words. The creative work will be 4,000-7,000 words, so that together they make a total of not more than 8,000 words.
As well as the final project, you will give a formatively assessed presentation, and submit summatively assessed draft work, in semester 1.

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EL6039 -

Enterprise and Writing (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to give you an insight into enterprise and innovation in the writing industries and to give you an understanding of careers that may be open to you as a graduate in English and Creative Writing. Assessment is designed to develop your ability generate project proposals, to work as part of a team to develop ideas, to improve your presentation skills and to prepare and support you in the process of applying for internships, residencies, grants and other forms of employment in the creative industries.
An open and forward-looking view will be taken of where work opportunities for writers and those interested in working in the literary industries will be found in the future. Many standard business models will be interrogated to examine how the business of publishing and selling books is changing and what this is likely to mean for authors and those working in the sector in the future. A particular emphasis will be placed on the changes that digitalisation is making to traditional publishing models and to the changing roles of writers, agents and publishers

The module will cover the following:

• How to understand jobs in the sector
• Contact with professionals from the writing industries
• Preparing for working in the sector
• Managing yourself as a small business
• Managing a freelance and portfolio career
• Generating project ideas and producing projects

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EL6042 -

Postwar US Writing (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will enhance your understanding of postwar American literary culture in its broader social, political, and
economic contexts. Mid-century America was a time of profound contradictions: while US citizens lived under the shadow the bomb, many experienced unprecedented economic prosperity and access to new material comforts. We will explore how national paranoia
about the spread of communism and the nuclear arms race sat alongside – and fed into – the postwar image of the American ‘good life’, an image of suburban conformity underpinned by the growth of advertising and consumer culture. We will consider how postwar fiction and poetry challenges this demand for conformity in both content and form: through its complex representations of the American cold war experience and its innovative narrative and poetic strategies. The texts on this module offer insights into postwar attitudes towards a diverse range of topics, including national and international politics, work, leisure, and domesticity, gender and sexuality, and race and ethnicity.

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EL6044 -

Writing Fantasy and Science Fiction (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn how to use the key forms, approaches and techniques of fantasy and science fiction in your own writing. As you explore these genres by reading a range of classic and contemporary texts, you will develop a critical understanding of speculative fiction in theory and practice. You will answer questions such as:
• What is a fantasy or science fiction text?
• How can we read such texts productively?
• What writing strategies do they use?
• How can you produce exciting and original fantasy/science fiction writing yourself?

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EL6046 -

Advanced Creative Writing (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is designed for students with some experience in creative writing to further develop their skills in prose and/or poetry, with an emphasis of producing longer pieces of writing. The module will examine the nature of genre, and will explore structure in the novel, novella, short story cycle, long poem and poetic sequence.
Although the focus of the module is on your own writing, we will read and discuss a number of texts in order to improve technique and help you in planning and carrying out your project.
Seminars will run as creative writing workshops in which students respond to writing exercises and learn to offer and receive feedback on their own and others’ work.

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EL6047 -

Twenty First Century Literature: Writing in the Present (Optional,20 Credits)

From Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (1985) and its popular television adaptation (2017) to Yorgos Lanthimos’ film The Lobster (2015), this module invites you to explore a wide and diverse range of novels, short stories and other media in order to promote and analyse the study of contemporary theoretical debates on gender, love, the body and sexuality.

Through the theoretical lens of feminism, psychoanalysis, queer theory and postmodernism, the module aims to develop your critical thinking and your existing knowledge of literature, film and television, from 1985 to the present day. It will encourage you to explore the complex issues raised by diverse critical theory and close analysis of a range of late twentieth and twenty-first century literature, film and television adaptation. By doing so, you will reflect on the ways that twenty-first literature and other media engages with, interrogates and often offers alternative narratives on present debates about gender, love, the body and sexuality.

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EL6049 -

From Jane Austen to Austenland: Representing the Regency in Literature and Film (Optional,20 Credits)

The Regency (1810-1820) is condensed and complex period of contrasts; whilst precipitating significant and lasting changes in literature, art, theatre, fashion, and architecture, it was also a period that was beset by war, ruthless suppression of popular protest, sexual scandal, and the Regent himself was an object of contempt and ridicule. However, the Regency has come to be represented in popular culture as the lost and last age of romance and elegance, partly the result of enhanced connections being made between Austen and the heritage industries in modern adaptations. This module examines representations of the Regency in literature and film, beginning with the works of Jane Austen, all of which were published during this period.

We will begin with an introduction to the social, cultural and political issues of the period, and we will consider Austen as a writer of the Regency. We will move on to consider the significance of twentieth-century adaptations, imitations and appropriations of Austen and representations of the Regency in the works of historical novelists such as Georgette Heyer and Barbara Cartland, and more contemporary works such as Shannon Hale’s ‘Austenland’. We will also consider the proliferation of Austen and the Regency-based texts in the American market in relation to thinking about both as a form of heritage tourism and escapism. Overall, we will be exploring the impact of Austen upon popular culture, how popular culture fosters a reconsideration of Austen and how we engage with both in relation how we envision our cultural past.

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EL6051 -

Contemporary Genre Fiction (Optional,20 Credits)

This module explores contemporary (post-millennial) genres of fiction with an emphasis on their innovativeness, contemporaneity and their interaction with socio-cultural developments of the new millennium. You will engage with cutting edge texts to study their innovations in and interactions with the contemporary world. Module content will focus on theorizing relationships between audiences, genres and critics and will encourage you to view yourself as part of the process of re-defining contemporary genres in terms of themes, cultural contexts and theoretical models. Genres under discussion will include: millennial text, 9/11 literature, digital writings, post-apocalyptic, crunch lit, the new erotica, Nordic noir and Brexit literature. Module teaching will explore innovations in genres of the contemporary period, consider the challenges of new technologies and media, and examine the political, economic and cultural contexts of contemporary genres. Taking in a broad range of theoretical approaches – including late modernism, postmodernism, globalisation and post 9/11 theory – the module will critically engage with the extent to which C21 genre fictions actively shape our understanding of twenty-first century society.

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EL6055 -

Writing and Environment (Optional,20 Credits)

You will study a selection of texts, written from the eighteenth century to the present day, that engage with the natural environment in various ways. These include natural histories and popular science, pastoral and environmental poems, environmental protest literature, apocalyptic novels, and the ‘new nature writing’. You will learn how literary writers describe the world around them and how they use the natural world to articulate their own personal needs, feelings, and desires. You will study texts that draw attention both to natural beauty and to environmental catastrophe. You will learn how writers as diverse as Gilbert White, William Wordsworth, Charles Darwin, Rachel Carson, and Robert Macfarlane have changed the ways in which readers engage with the world around them. As part of your studies, you will learn to produce your own literary engagement with the natural world in a ‘creative field journal’, inspired by the writings of Charles Darwin, Robert Macfarlane, Amy Liptrott, and others. By the end of the module, you will have gained a sophisticated understanding not only of the ways that writers can change the world, but also how they can save it.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

English Literature and Creative Writing BA (Hons)

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

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