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Current, relevant and inspiring, this course offers you an exciting opportunity to study the political dimensions of life around the world, recognising the connections between people, locales, ideas and problems.

How do states interact with one another and what implications does this have for individuals?

Should we be concerned primarily with our own well-being or do we have duties and responsibilities beyond our own borders?

Does democracy still work for us or are there other ways of expressing our voice and finding solutions for shared problems?

At the heart of the course is the belief that individuals can make a difference and effect positive change in the world.

Taking an integrated approach to academic theory and applying it to real world problems, this course will provide you with the tools to make a difference in your personal and professional life.

A highly integrated and distinctive course which goes beyond traditional policy analysis to focus on global citizenship and agency.

98% of students agreed that staff are good at explaining things (Unistats, 2016)

Current, relevant and inspiring, this course offers you an exciting opportunity to study the political dimensions of life around the world, recognising the connections between people, locales, ideas and problems.

How do states interact with one another and what implications does this have for individuals?

Should we be concerned primarily with our own well-being or do we have duties and responsibilities beyond our own borders?

Does democracy still work for us or are there other ways of expressing our voice and finding solutions for shared problems?

At the heart of the course is the belief that individuals can make a difference and effect positive change in the world.

Taking an integrated approach to academic theory and applying it to real world problems, this course will provide you with the tools to make a difference in your personal and professional life.

A highly integrated and distinctive course which goes beyond traditional policy analysis to focus on global citizenship and agency.

98% of students agreed that staff are good at explaining things (Unistats, 2016)

Course Information

UCAS Code
L2L2

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Social Sciences

Location
Lipman Building, Newcastle City Campus

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019

Department / Social Sciences

The Department of Social Sciences offers an extensive range of courses in Criminology, Sociology, International Relations International Development, Media, Journalism and Mass Communications.

Book an Open Day / Experience International Relations and Politics BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study International Relations and Politics. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

You will learn from enthusiastic and well-published teachers and researchers from across the UK and Europe. Our team is one of the most research-active groups in the Department of Social Sciences and Languages, publishing widely in well-known academic journals, responding to contemporary issues and developments, as well as engaging with wider political ideas that shape the way we think and act politically.

Our staff have extensive experience of working for governmental and non-governmental organisations in project and course evaluations, voluntary and community sector involvement, neighbourhood governance and local partnership working. They have conducted research for think tanks and academic institutions around the globe.

Book an Open Day / Experience International Relations and Politics BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study International Relations and Politics. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

This course is designed to promote research-rich learning and to be responsive to your needs. You will study core modules aimed at developing your understanding of theory and practice, enabling you to engage with contemporary debates.

You will learn how political research is carried out and explore different methodologies within the discipline, including collecting and analysing data. This base of research skills will provide the foundation blocks for your dissertation, as well as your future career. You will leave us, not only an incisive and critical thinker, but a critical citizen.

Book an Open Day / Experience International Relations and Politics

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study International Relations and Politics. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

In conjunction with traditional lectures and seminars, we use a range of technology -enhanced applications including Blackboard, TurnitinUK and electronic reading lists to support your learning. The course team have developed a blog to keep you up to speed with current and relevant debates in politics as well as bringing you the latest course news.

The teaching team are also keen to pioneer new approaches to engage you via smartphones and associated apps and via social media, with the aim to improve your learning experience. We will experiment with new ways of engaging you via tablets and other devices to enable individual and group interaction.

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Experience International Relations and Politics BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study International Relations and Politics. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

This research-rich course has been designed so that you are at its centre. In the first year of study, you will learn core concepts and theories, study different political systems, investigate the nature and merit of democracy, the role of Britain in the modern world, and the question of why and how states go to war or choose to cooperate with one another. Your second year will build upon this base with themes such as governance (global and national), the further study of theories of international relations and the application of research methods, with greater emphasis on developing your competence in investigating and solving problems. Your third year is about the consolidation of these skills so that you are prepared for a life beyond university, as a global citizen as well as a graduate professional.

Our research activity has not only led to excellent results in the recent Research Excellence Framework, a national exercise to measure excellence in research, but also shapes the way we teach and how our students learn.

Research / Social Sciences

Research in Social Sciences is supported by one specialist Research Centre and three Research Groups: International Development; International Public Policy and Management; Civil Society and Citizenship; Crime and Justice.

Book an Open Day / Experience International Relations and Politics BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study International Relations and Politics. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Many graduate jobs require you to gather, synthesise and represent complex ideas and relationships in writing, in oral presentations and increasingly also visually. Our teaching and learning activities will provide you with plenty of opportunity to give presentations and practise your ability to inform, ‘teach’ and indeed persuade your audience.

This course will foster your intellectual curiosity and help you to become a critical, independent thinker. You will be introduced to a range of learning activities that have employability and enterprise at the core. You will have the opportunity to do work experience and engage in extra-curricular activities such as debating or volunteering to further develop your skills and, more importantly, your interests.

This combination of knowledge and skills will provide you with an excellent foundation for your future career.

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Experience International Relations and Politics BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study International Relations and Politics. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

This course aims to produce global citizens who are incisive and creative thinkers and not afraid to ask the big and often challenging questions. Our aim is to develop students who believe they can change society for the better.

Many of our graduates go on to work in politics, for example as analysts or advisers for MPs and political parties, for local government or the Civil Service. This degree prepares you well for a career in the legal profession and journalism, while the analytical and independent research skills you gain will also serve you well in management roles elsewhere, such as retail.

Graduates on related degrees have gone on to enjoy careers in Westminster and Brussels, in local government, in the charitable sector, in retail, banking and finance and in self-employment.

Book an Open Day / Experience International Relations and Politics BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study International Relations and Politics. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Who would this Course suit?

Ever wondered how the people, places and problems of the world are connected? This course will suit anyone with an enquiring mind and a genuine interest in people, power and institutions, who is looking for a future in politics, government, the legal or financial sectors or journalism.  

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels 

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit 

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher 

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB to include

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 credits at Distinction and 27 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A l

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications<

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

FUNDING INFORMATION

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for UK/EU undergraduate tuition fee information**.

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information.

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying.

Click here for information on fee liability.

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* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

IR4001 -

Britain, Europe and the World (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the changing role of Britain in the world and the challenges that currently face Britain in its engagement with Europe and the wider world.
You will learn how and why British foreign policy changed in response to the political and economic situation in which it found itself at the end of the Second World War, and how Britain struggled to come to terms with the new realities of the post-war world in which its former, prominent position as a world power was being challenged on a number of fronts as economic, political and military power was shifting in a post-war world that was responding to a changed and changing order in which new and different alliances were being forged and European colonial powers were having to respond to pressures to recognise claims for national self-determination.
You will learn about Britain’s so-called ‘special relationship’ with the United States, particularly in the context of the Cold War and the so-called ‘War on Terror’, Britain’s changing attitude to its relationship with the neighbouring western European countries, and how and why Britain decided to join the European Economic Community and its subsequent ‘awkward relationship’ with its fellow member-states.
You will learn about how and why the British Empire was dismantled and, in part, transformed into the Commonwealth.
All of these issues will be studied in their historical context with a focus on how Britain’s foreign relations developed over the course of the mid/late 20th century and into the 21st century.

More information

IR4002 -

Democrats and Dictators (Core, 20 Credits)

How can we distinguish between democratic and non-democratic regimes? How does the nature of the political system affect the dynamics of rule, representation, accountability and participation in democratic regimes? Similarly, how can we differentiate between non-democratic regimes and how do we explain their existence? How and why do some countries seek to democratise? Why do these efforts succeed in some cases but fail in others? These are the core questions that you will consider on this module, which is organised around four main topics: the conceptualisation of democratic and non-democratic regimes; political systems in democratic countries; the categorisation and governance of non-democratic regimes, and democratisation, paying attention to the role of domestic and international forces. Each of these topics is further underpinned by the themes of rule, representation, accountability and participation, which you will also explore in modules at levels 5 and 6.

More information

IR4003 -

International Conflict and Cooperation (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module I will engage with key concepts and theories of International Relations and learn essential academic skills. I will learn about the three standard schools of International Relations thought, i.e. Liberalism, Realism and Marxism, and begin using them to understand states and state practice, as well as the ordering of the international. In this module I will learn to question common sense beliefs about what states are and the status of the powerful (e.g. US, UK) by engaging with academic literature and case studies. Key concepts will include sovereignty, hegemony, war, peace, security etc.

More information

IR4004 -

Researching International Relations and Politics (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module you will learn why political scientists undertake research and how political scientists do it. You will examine the key approaches and methods used to help explain and understand issues in international relations and politics. You will learn about the role of theory in developing research, how research is designed, and how arguments are made and evaluated. You will learn why it is important to collect and consider different types of evidence, and be introduced to quantitative and qualitative methods used to analyse this information. You will learn techniques of critical analysis that will help you apply logic and reasoning to my studies of politics throughout your degree and beyond. The module will provide you with an essential foundation for independent research in year 2 (Applied Research Methods) and final year (the dissertation), but importantly helps you to think critically about international relations and politics and thus to become a graduate.

More information

IR4005 -

Thinking Globally (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module you will be introduced to, understand and analyse patterns and processes of political globalization and the role of different actors that contribute to political globalization. Actors include the nation-state, non-state actors (including environmental and human rights NGOs, multinational corporations, terrorist networks), international organizations, and sub-national units. You will learn how these different actors interact to create complementing and competing processes in a globalizing world. Thematic areas that you will study include: international law, global governance, human rights, development, inequality, global commons, global democracy, and global activism.

More information

IR4006 -

Thinking Politically (Core, 20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to introduce students to the main thinkers, ideas and debates within political philosophy and political theory. The module differentiates between the different branches of politics (i.e. political economy, political philosophy and theory, and political science) before examining the debates about human nature; the nature of society without government; the arguments for and against democracy; justifying the existence of the state and state rule; liberty; equality; how to produce and distribute the goods and services that society needs and desires; and social justice. Furthermore, it links these debates – and the ideas and theories that inform them – to a range of contemporary political ideologies and assesses the impact of these upon politics and society more generally.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5019 -

Social Sciences Study Abroad (60 credit) (Optional, 60 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is a semester based 60 credit module which is available on degree courses which facilitate study abroad within the programme. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be constructed to meet the learning outcomes for the programme for the semester in question, dependent on suitable modules from the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). The module will be assessed by conversion of graded marks from the host University.

Learning outcomes on the year-long modules on which the student is unable to attend the home institution must be met at the host institution, and marks from the host are incorporated into the modules as part of the overall assessment.

More information

IR5001 -

Applied Research Methods (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module I will learn how to design and carry out a political research project. My learning will build on year one to further examine how political scientists undertake research. I will be introduced to a number of research methods used within the discipline of International Relations and Politics and have the opportunity to apply key research skills. I will have the opportunity to practice the various stages of a research project and learn how to relate the findings to key issues and debates within international relations and political science.

This module adds practical depth to the theoretical frameworks developed in my first year of study and is the foundation for undertaking the systematic investigation required for the Dissertation module in my final year. However, I recognise that in many ways everything about the study of international relations and politics is ‘research’ and this module will bring together the theory and practice of political research which underpins everything I am studying. I realise that learning about the process of undertaking a piece of political research has the potential to transform my understanding of and engagement with everything I learn here at university.

More information

IR5002 -

Chinese Politics (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module I will be introduced to, understand and analyse a range of issues within the field of Chinese Politics. The focus of the module is on domestic Chinese politics. I will be introduced to modern Chinese history starting from the Opium War in order to understand the historical path of China from an imperial to a communist state and the policies that led to China turning communist in 1949.

I will then learn in depth about the policies after 1949 to the present in order to understand the policies of the revolutionary government and the emergence of capitalist reform. Specifically, this will cover economic policies, social policies, environmental policies, ethnic policies, and towards the end of the module the emergence of China in the global political landscape.

More information

IR5003 -

Theories and Practice of Democracy (Core, 20 Credits)

What is a democracy? Are elections enough? How can democracy be improved in contemporary society? In this module you will be invited to challenge the traditional view that elections are sufficient for democracy. In doing so, you will explore theoretical and contemporary debates surrounding direct and indirect democracy, political representation and participation. Case studies will be used to explore themes such as citizen participation (e.g. Participatory budgeting, e-democracy, consultation, focus groups), non-electoral representation, partnership working, social capital and the big society in context of the so called shift from government to governance.

More information

IR5005 -

Global Governance (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module I will learn how international organisations enable and constrain the choices of governments and states; how they impact upon states and the lives of ordinary citizens. In particular, I will find out how the United Nations and the European Union are important within international politics, but also how membership of these organisations can have an impact upon specific countries and how they conduct their internal and foreign policies. I will learn about the various institutions that form the United Nations and the European Union, and key policy areas and practices of these organisations.

Topics covered in this module include:
1. United Nations institutions: General Assembly, Security Council, Secretary-General, ECOSOC, Trusteeship Council
2. United Nations policies & practices: collective security, development, human rights, environment
3. European Union institutions: Commission, Council, Parliament, Court of Justice. Also explore the significance of “other” European institutions (i.e. the ECHR)
4. European Union policies: including but not limited to economic and monetary union, justice and home affairs, common foreign and security policy

More information

IR5006 -

Politics Work Experience (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module I will learn about the practice of politics. This module complements my learning of political concepts and academic theory by introducing me to the real world of politics. The module provides me with the opportunity to utilise my academic knowledge and develop my understanding by reflecting on how politics operates in the working environment. I will be required to reflect on the connections between academic theory and my experience of practice. It also provides me with the opportunity to develop my research skills which will be applied to a real piece of research. The module will also introduce me to possible careers in politics and enable me to have a more practical understanding of how politics works and, also, the skills required for a career in this area.

More information

IR5007 -

The UN, war and liberal interventionism (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module I will learn how the United Nations manages conflict and war around the world in its pursuit to achieve international peace and security. I will use tools of conflict analysis to investigate contextual dimensions and their interaction with the conflict management tools available to the UN. Case studies will provide me with examples to illustrate and as a means to use conflict analysis methods in-depth.

Topics covered on this module are likely to include:
• United Nations institutions
• Diplomatic measures
• Sanctions
• Collective security
• Traditional peacekeeping
• Wider peacekeeping
• Post-conflict peacebuilding
• Transitional administration
• Peacemaking
• Humanitarian intervention
• Responsibility to Protect

More information

IR5008 -

Theories of International Relations (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module I will learn how different scholars have thought about and conceptualised international relations. I will study the range of theories of International Relations, including the three main schools of Liberalism, Realism, Marxism and their variants, and post-structural and critical theories. Learning about the different ways in which we can see, understand and explain international relations will provide me with a better range of tools to form my own understanding and explanation of what I observe, study and read, and thus enhance my skills of critical analysis when engaging with academic literature but also when engaging with political events around the world.

Theories covered in this module will include:
• Neorealism, Neoliberal institutionalism, English School, Constructivism, neo-Marxism
• Critical theory, Postmodernism/Poststructuralism, Feminism, Postcolonialism, International Political Theory

More information

IR5009 -

UK Politics Beyond Westminster (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module I will investigate the forms of sub-national and territorial governance within the UK. In doing so, I will address the question of whether recent developments beyond Westminster spell the end of the unitary state in the UK, mark the shift to a Federal system or even lead to the ‘Break up of Britain’. My understanding of such a fundamental political question will be enhanced by a strong historical focus on the evolution of decentralisation in the UK, a clear understanding of the conceptual and theoretical basis of decentralisation and devolution, and a wider comparative focus on decentralisation in nations other than the UK. The module will test a number of my assumptions about the nature of the British political system and give me a clear understanding of the new forces of nationalism, identity and distrust of Westminster that are beginning to reshape British Politics.

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IR5011 -

From Bastille to Strasbourg- A Journey through Human Rights (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will explore human rights through three main themes: the philosophy of human rights, the implementation of human rights, human rights and globalisation.

In the ‘philosophy of human rights’ section, you will analyse the history of the concept of human rights and its critiques, starting with the first universal declaration in 1789.

In the ‘implementation of Human Rights’ section, you will critically analyse its gradual codification and legal implementation, at an international, European and national levels, and how real protection mechanisms were implemented after the Second World War, and critically evaluate its limitations. You will focus on three areas: the European Convention on Human Rights and the new rights acquired by European citizens to defend themselves against their own State; the rise of constitutional courts, focusing on the development of constitutional democracies as opposed to majority democracies and the frictions such a change has entailed, using France and Britain as case studies; the role the EU has played for the protection of human rights, starting from the So Lange case in Germany that forced the EU to become more attentive to Human Rights to an exploration of the four freedoms and finishing with an analysis of the European Charter of fundamental Rights.

In the ‘Human Rights and globalisation’ section you will examine the challenges human rights face in a globalised world by focusing on the universalist versus relativist debate on the one hand, humanitarian intervention and right to protect on the other.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5017 -

Social Sciences Work Placement Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks. You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AD5018 -

Social Sciences Study Abroad Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

IR6001 -

Active Citizens (Core, 20 Credits)

Is there a crisis of governance in Britain and elsewhere? To what extent does the evidence suggest that democracy is in crisis today? These questions provide the starting point for this module. It encourages you to build upon the critical understanding of democracy and governance that you gained in Democratic Politics at level 5, but approaches the topic from a different perspective. Against this background, you will explore the range of different ways that citizens, particularly as part of organisations and global social movements seek to influence and, in some cases, challenge the state and/or market. In this respect, the concept of civil society and the dynamics of state, market and civil society relationship are central to this module. Using case studies, the module will consider themes such as the Anti-globalisation and anti-capitalist movement; the World Social Forum; the politics of pressure, lobbying and campaigning; think tanks; wealth, power and philanthropy; the role of trade unions and the politics of “everyday activism” and volunteering.

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IR6002 -

Critical Security (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module I will critically engage with the concept of security. I will especially be introduced to traditional and non-traditional concepts of security. This includes an engagement with traditional notions of security (i.e. state security) and the emergence and increasing political importance of non-traditional security (including, but not limited to, human security, comprehensive security, environmental security, food security, energy security, water security). I will critically evaluate the utility of traditional and non-traditional notions of security. Within the non-traditional security complex, I will examine the different types of security, including their differences and similarities, their usefulness, and through case studies and I will engage with their real-life application and global political relevance.

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IR6003 -

Dissertation (Core, 40 Credits)

In this module you will have the opportunity to pursue independently a self-selected research project on a topic related to the field of International Relations and Politics. Through your research, you will analyze about a specific topic in the subject of International Relations and Politics, gaining in-depth understanding. You will learn to put into effect the skills that you have learned on other modules, in particular those relating to research methods and the management of research projects.

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IR6004 -

Genocide (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module I will analyse how ideas of genocide have evolved throughout the twentieth century. I will be encouraged to consider the political and legal consequences of genocides, and to engage with the socio/cultural/ethno/economic/religious explanations that some key thinkers have forwarded as being causal factors of genocide. I will also examine how policymakers have grappled with the problem of preventing and stopping genocides once they have begun.

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IR6005 -

Media Power and Propaganda (Optional, 20 Credits)

Most people find out about politics, and what is going on in the wider world, through the media. It is therefore critical to understand how the media functions in contemporary society. This module focuses upon the debate about the role of the media in liberal democracies: is it an independent check on the exercise of power or an instrument by which the powerful manipulate the masses? What is the impact of the media upon individuals: does it inform us or brainwash us? How are the Internet and other new technologies affecting individual’s ability to access alternative sources of information to the established media? What implications do these new media have for states that seek to direct, if not control, the public’s access to information? What role, if any, should propaganda play in a liberal democracy? Using concepts, such as power, and theories of media effects, media performance and interpersonal communication, students will be encouraged to engage with these fundamental questions.

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IR6006 -

Political Parties and Elections (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module I will learn about political parties and elections largely within the context of British politics. I will be introduced to debates about class and understand some of the reasons why class and voting are related. I will explore the contested question of the declining relevance of class politics. During this module I will learn how parties to the left and right of the political spectrum have responded to class issues. From the creation of the Labour Party and the decline of the Liberals to One-Nation Conservatism, Thatcherism and the rise of the far right. This module will provide me with an understanding of how class issues impacted recent general elections.

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IR6007 -

Politics of Oil and Global Warming (Optional, 20 Credits)

Two of the most important problems facing humanity are climate change and energy security. In terms of solutions, a number of very different approaches have been suggested that range from the technological to the radical; how we address and solve these problems is therefore political. This module highlights how energy and resource intensive the average Western way of life is and what this means for climate change and energy security; explores the debate about peak oil (i.e. the point at which cheap and easily accessible oil starts to run out) and considers its political implications; investigates how Western foreign policy has been influenced by the desire to access, if not control, energy sources (e.g. Middle Eastern oil); evaluates the debate about climate change and how politicians have, and could, respond; and assesses the debate about energy policy and how politicians have, and could, respond to the twin demands of tackling global warming while ‘keeping the lights on’.

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IR6008 -

Terrorism (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module I will analyse how ideas of terrorism have evolved throughout the twentieth century. This module offers me an opportunity to study in some depth the modern terrorism phenomenon and the methods currently being undertaken to counter it. I will focus essentially on two questions: what, exactly, is terrorism and what can be done about it?

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IR6009 -

Women in Politics and International Relations (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module I will learn about the gendered nature of politics and the role of/for women in national and international politics. I will investigate where, i.e. in which institutions and roles women can be found around the world and the reasons for their absence or presence. I will study institutions such as parliament, government, foreign policy roles and international organisations.

Weeks 1-2: Introduction to the history and theory of feminism, the ‘woman’ question and gender
Weeks 3-11: descriptive and formal representation in national and international politics, comparing countries and regions; theories of access

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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