Skip navigation

If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

CLOSE

How does the law respond to the most serious atrocities across the globe? What are the laws that govern war and armed conflict? To what degree is the Permanent International Criminal Court and other internationalised tribunals effective in holding individuals accountable for the most serious crimes; genocide, war crime and crimes against humanity?

These are just some of the crucial questions you address in a bespoke LLM equipping you with advanced knowledge and skills in the field of international criminal law. You will gain foundational knowledge in both international human rights law and the law on armed conflict. These modules offer much needed context and enable you to gain a holistic understanding of the international legal system. With this background, you will acquire specialist knowledge and skills in the principles of international criminal law and procedure often considering the law from various perspectives; prosecution, defence, and victims to name only a few. Recognising that in a globalised world crime is no longer confined to the territory of one State, you will also examine transnational criminal law given the increasing number of cross-border crimes such as terrorism, trafficking, and cybercrime. Your knowledge and skills will be informed by a diverse range of approaches to studying law; theoretical, doctrinal and comparative. 

Taken together, this comprehensive course will help you understand and tackle the legal challenges in the course of establishing accountability, peace, and respect for human rights.

The course emphasises practical skills and how to overcome dilemmas frequently experienced by practitioners in client-facing and litigation settings, as well as examining the procedural difficulties that tribunals such as the International Criminal Court often face. During the course, you will undertake activities from the perspective of the prosecution, defence, victims counsel and the judicial bench (i.e., judges). There will also be several opportunities for you to listen to guest lectures and engage in interactive talks with external practitioners that have experience of working in internationalised tribunals.

Notably, teaching on this LLM and able to share extensive practical insight will be Sir Howard Morrison QC KCMG. Sir Howard is a Visiting Professor who has had an extensive judicial career both in the UK and internationally including serving as a Judge at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and as an Appellate judge at the International Criminal Court for over twelve years. During this time Sir Howard served as a judge in a number of high-profile cases involving the most serious crimes of international concern, such as the trial of Radovan Karadzic. He is currently an Independent Adviser to the Ukrainian Prosecutor General, Iryna Venediktova and will be providing independent and expert legal advice to the Ukrainian Prosecutor General in relation to the investigation and prosecution of war crimes committed in Ukraine.

Designed by a team of academics with a combination of research and practical experience, the LLM Law (International Criminal Law and Practice) is tailored to meet the needs of individuals who are currently employed, or indeed aspire to work in the field of international criminal law, but also other areas of domestic and international legal practice, including the Bar, with international organisations such as the UN, for civil society and non-governmental organisations, and at the civil service, as well as in academia should you be keen to engage in further doctoral studies.

It is not necessary to have an undergraduate law qualification and there are no jurisdictional restrictions, so you will be part of a diverse and intellectually stimulating cohort. You will learn from each other’s experiences in a relaxed and collaborative environment.

Northumbria Law School is one of the largest law schools in the UK, and you will be taught academics with an international reputation for research in the field of international criminal law and related fields. You will benefit from our strong links with the Northeast legal community and be able to seek guidance from staff that continue to be engage in legal practice.

Course Information

Level of Study
Postgraduate

Mode of Study
1 year full-time

Department
Northumbria Law School

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2022

Fee Information

Module Information

Funding and Scholarships

Discover the funding options available to you.

Discover NU World / A virtual journey through everything Northumbria has to offer.

Explore our immersive 360 tours, informative subject videos, inspirational student profiles, ground-breaking research, and a range of life at university blogs videos and articles.

Entry Requirements 2022/23

Standard Entry

Applicants should normally have:

A minimum of a 2:2 honours degree in either law, a relevant social science based discipline, or a relevant non-law degree. Relevant professional qualifications or suitable work experience will also be considered.

International qualifications:

If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English language requirements:

International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.5 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

 *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS.  You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2022/23 Entry

Full UK Fee: £9,075

Full EU Fee: £16,500

Full International Fee: £16,500



Scholarships and Discounts

Click here for UK, EU and International scholarship, fees, and funding information.


ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

GD7000 -

Academic Language Skills for PG Law Students (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition to postgraduate level study in the use and practice of subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to further develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills suitable for a postgraduate level of study.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding postgraduate assignment briefs.
• Developing advanced academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising advanced ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring postgraduate level academic assignments (e.g. essays, dissertations and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Speaking in postgraduate seminar presentations.
• Giving discipline-related postgraduate level academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Postgraduate level speed reading techniques.

More information

LW7088 -

Research for Advanced Legal Studies (Core,20 Credits)

This module offers a critical introduction to legal research methods. It is designed to ensure that you will be able to confidently embark on legal research on your Masters programme whatever your academic background or jurisdiction. Your lectures are designed to refresh and develop your understanding of legal research techniques, referencing and evaluating sources. In your workshops you will be provided with opportunities to undertake and obtain feedback upon a series of legal research and writing tasks, thus enabling you to develop critical understanding of what it meant by effective legal research, and how you yourself can become an effective legal researcher.

More information

LW7089 -

Legal Research Project (LLM Framework) (Core,60 Credits)

In this module you will draw on your skills and knowledge acquired from the taught elements of the LLM branch specialism and will develop and refine these in the context of a self-chosen area of independent specialist study. You will develop; (1) your understanding and use of legal research techniques, (2) An ability to critically analyse and evaluate legal data, (3) the ability to handle complex legal material systematically and creatively including material at the forefront of the field of study, (4) a conceptual understanding of the research topic, (5) skill at showing a systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of current legal issues, (6) the ability to communicate legal information, arguments and conclusions within accepted academic conventions.

More information

LW7129 -

Transnational Criminal Law (Core,20 Credits)

You will receive a substantive introduction in the area of transnational criminal law. The module specifically focuses on 4 key areas of transnational crime; transnational organised crime, human trafficking, cyber-crime and terrorism. You will also cover the mechanisms of state co-operation with respect to transnational crimes, such as mutual legal assistance and extradition and considers key questions in relation to jurisdiction such as the aut dedere aut judicare principle. You will also study the workings of bodies dedicated to the promotion of inter-state co-operation such as Eurojust, Europol and Interpol and to the suppression of transnational criminality within the European Union.
Outline of substantive topic areas:

? The concept of transnational crime
? International law enforcement cooperation
? Jurisdiction
? Extradition
? Transnational Organised Crime
? Human Trafficking
? Cyber-crime
? Terrorism
? Future trends

More information

LW7140 -

International Criminal Law (Core,20 Credits)

Taught by academic experts, this module will develop your critical understanding of the substantive law of international crimes. Our discussion will focus on the core crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and the crime of aggression as defined in the Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC). You will learn different methods and techniques of comparative law and its significance to the development of international criminal law (ICL) as well as to the work of the International Criminal Tribunals, namely, the ICC, the International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda and other hybrid criminal courts. The module will take critical look at the elements of crimes, the attribution of individual criminal responsibility, and modes of perpetration and participation from comparative and international criminal law perspectives.


Weekly workshop schedule

1. Fundamentals of International Criminal Law (ICL)
2. Methods and techniques of comparative law and its significance to the development of ICL
3. International Criminal Prosecution: from Nuremberg to the ICC
4. Substantive law of International crimes: Genocide
5. Substantive law of International crimes: Crimes against humanity
6. Substantive law of International crimes: War crimes
7. Substantive law of International crimes: The crime of aggression
8. Transnational Crimes: The work of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon in defining terrorism
9. General principles of liability: Perpetration of International Crimes (comparative perspective)
10. General principles of liability: Participation in International Crimes (comparative perspective)
11. Contemporary issues before domestic criminal tribunals dealing with international crimes
12. Contemporary issues before international criminal tribunals – prosecuting jihadists before the ICC

On completion of this module, you should be able to:

• understand the application and interpretation of substantive international criminal law by international, hybrid and domestic courts and tribunals
• explore and evaluate the elements of international crimes and its interpretation by international criminal courts and tribunals
• acquire in-depth knowledge on the most pressing issues facing the attribution of individual criminal responsibility to alleged perpetrators
• evaluate potential reforms and improvements that can be made to international criminal law

More information

LW7141 -

International Criminal Procedure (Core,20 Credits)

Taught by academic experts, this module will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of international criminal procedure, from the initiation of an investigation to the appeals process. The module will focus on the International Criminal Court’s legal process and will allow you to compare and contrast procedures at hybrid international tribunals such as the Extraordinary Chambers of the Courts in Cambodia, as well as procedures that were in place at the two ad hoc tribunals. Adopting a doctrinal and a socio-legal focus, you will study the latest case law on the interpretation of the Rome Statute and its Rules of Procedure and Evidence and you will evaluate the wider scholarly literature on procedural challenges and complexities. You will critically analyse controversial features such as the exercise of prosecutorial discretion (including decisions not to prosecute in ‘the interests of justice’), victim participation, the preliminary examination process, and assessments of admissibility. You will also examine, from theoretical, comparative and practical perspectives, the legal process of international criminal tribunals vis-à-vis the rights and guarantees for a fair trial as enshrined in international and regional human rights instruments as well as in common law and civil law traditions. By the end of the module you will be able to appraise possible improvements and reforms to international criminal procedure.

Weekly workshop schedule

1. Introduction to the international criminal process
2. The interface of civil law and common law legal systems
3. Jurisdiction and admissibility
4. Initiation of investigations and selection of cases
5. Pre-Trial procedure
6. The trial
7. Appeals and review
8. Evidentiary rules
9. The defence
10. Assessing the role of victims in International Criminal Court proceedings
11. Assessing the practice of plea bargaining and trials in absentia
12. Consolidation and reform

On completion of this module, you should be able to:

• Describe and understand the key procedural stages of a case at the International Criminal Court
• Compare and contrast international criminal procedure across a range of international criminal tribunals
• Analyse controversial features of criminal procedure at the International Criminal Court
• Evaluate potential reforms and improvements that can be made to international criminal procedure

More information

LW7142 -

International Human Rights Law (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about the structure of modern international human rights law and practice, the origins of the international human rights law system, and its relationship to the development of international criminal law. In particular, you will gain an understanding of international human rights law as a response of the international community to serious humanitarian abuses such as genocide, torture, slavery, and enforced disappearance. Drawing on contemporary case studies, this module provides you with a unique opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge on the most pressing issues facing international criminal justice. This will inform your understanding of modern international human rights practice and its capacity to prevent such abuses from taking place.

Outline of seminar topics:
1. The relationship between international human rights law and international criminal law: Nuremberg, Tokyo, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
2. The structure of the modern international human rights system (I): The treaty-based mechanisms
3. The structure of the modern international human rights system (II): The charter-based mechanisms
4. Human rights law as a response to genocide
5. Human rights law as a response to torture
6. Human rights law as a response to enforced disappearance
7. Human rights law as a response to modern slavery
8. Human rights during armed conflict
9. Human rights during belligerent occupation
10. Human rights and the International Criminal Court
11. Contemporary developments (I): Gender-based persecution as a crime against humanity
12. Contemporary developments (II): Mass atrocities in the age of social media

More information

LW7143 -

International Law and Armed Conflict (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about international law as a response to armed conflict – meaning both the law governing the use of force (the jus ad bellum) and concerning the conduct of hostilities (the jus in bello or international humanitarian law (IHL)). This will inform your understanding of what is meant by a ‘war crime’, and how individual criminal responsibility can arise during armed conflict and cases of belligerent occupation. The module will also provide you with an introduction to the practice of modern international humanitarian law and its procedural elements.

Outline of seminar topics:
1. International Law and Armed Conflict: Key Themes
2. The Use of Force (I): Self-defence
3. The Use of Force (II): the Security Council
4. The Use of Force (III): Humanitarian intervention and the ‘responsibility to protect’
5. The Use of Force (IV): The crime of aggression
6. IHL and international armed conflict
7. IHL and non-international armed conflict
8. Combatant status
9. The law of belligerent occupation
10. IHL and the law of targeting
11. IHL and International Criminal Law
12. Rights and obligations of non-state actors under IHL

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

GD7000 -

Academic Language Skills for PG Law Students (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition to postgraduate level study in the use and practice of subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to further develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills suitable for a postgraduate level of study.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding postgraduate assignment briefs.
• Developing advanced academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising advanced ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring postgraduate level academic assignments (e.g. essays, dissertations and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Speaking in postgraduate seminar presentations.
• Giving discipline-related postgraduate level academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Postgraduate level speed reading techniques.

More information

LW7088 -

Research for Advanced Legal Studies (Core,20 Credits)

This module offers a critical introduction to legal research methods. It is designed to ensure that you will be able to confidently embark on legal research on your Masters programme whatever your academic background or jurisdiction. Your lectures are designed to refresh and develop your understanding of legal research techniques, referencing and evaluating sources. In your workshops you will be provided with opportunities to undertake and obtain feedback upon a series of legal research and writing tasks, thus enabling you to develop critical understanding of what it meant by effective legal research, and how you yourself can become an effective legal researcher.

More information

LW7089 -

Legal Research Project (LLM Framework) (Core,60 Credits)

In this module you will draw on your skills and knowledge acquired from the taught elements of the LLM branch specialism and will develop and refine these in the context of a self-chosen area of independent specialist study. You will develop; (1) your understanding and use of legal research techniques, (2) An ability to critically analyse and evaluate legal data, (3) the ability to handle complex legal material systematically and creatively including material at the forefront of the field of study, (4) a conceptual understanding of the research topic, (5) skill at showing a systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of current legal issues, (6) the ability to communicate legal information, arguments and conclusions within accepted academic conventions.

More information

LW7129 -

Transnational Criminal Law (Core,20 Credits)

You will receive a substantive introduction in the area of transnational criminal law. The module specifically focuses on 4 key areas of transnational crime; transnational organised crime, human trafficking, cyber-crime and terrorism. You will also cover the mechanisms of state co-operation with respect to transnational crimes, such as mutual legal assistance and extradition and considers key questions in relation to jurisdiction such as the aut dedere aut judicare principle. You will also study the workings of bodies dedicated to the promotion of inter-state co-operation such as Eurojust, Europol and Interpol and to the suppression of transnational criminality within the European Union.
Outline of substantive topic areas:

? The concept of transnational crime
? International law enforcement cooperation
? Jurisdiction
? Extradition
? Transnational Organised Crime
? Human Trafficking
? Cyber-crime
? Terrorism
? Future trends

More information

LW7140 -

International Criminal Law (Core,20 Credits)

Taught by academic experts, this module will develop your critical understanding of the substantive law of international crimes. Our discussion will focus on the core crimes of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and the crime of aggression as defined in the Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC). You will learn different methods and techniques of comparative law and its significance to the development of international criminal law (ICL) as well as to the work of the International Criminal Tribunals, namely, the ICC, the International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and Rwanda and other hybrid criminal courts. The module will take critical look at the elements of crimes, the attribution of individual criminal responsibility, and modes of perpetration and participation from comparative and international criminal law perspectives.


Weekly workshop schedule

1. Fundamentals of International Criminal Law (ICL)
2. Methods and techniques of comparative law and its significance to the development of ICL
3. International Criminal Prosecution: from Nuremberg to the ICC
4. Substantive law of International crimes: Genocide
5. Substantive law of International crimes: Crimes against humanity
6. Substantive law of International crimes: War crimes
7. Substantive law of International crimes: The crime of aggression
8. Transnational Crimes: The work of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon in defining terrorism
9. General principles of liability: Perpetration of International Crimes (comparative perspective)
10. General principles of liability: Participation in International Crimes (comparative perspective)
11. Contemporary issues before domestic criminal tribunals dealing with international crimes
12. Contemporary issues before international criminal tribunals – prosecuting jihadists before the ICC

On completion of this module, you should be able to:

• understand the application and interpretation of substantive international criminal law by international, hybrid and domestic courts and tribunals
• explore and evaluate the elements of international crimes and its interpretation by international criminal courts and tribunals
• acquire in-depth knowledge on the most pressing issues facing the attribution of individual criminal responsibility to alleged perpetrators
• evaluate potential reforms and improvements that can be made to international criminal law

More information

LW7141 -

International Criminal Procedure (Core,20 Credits)

Taught by academic experts, this module will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of international criminal procedure, from the initiation of an investigation to the appeals process. The module will focus on the International Criminal Court’s legal process and will allow you to compare and contrast procedures at hybrid international tribunals such as the Extraordinary Chambers of the Courts in Cambodia, as well as procedures that were in place at the two ad hoc tribunals. Adopting a doctrinal and a socio-legal focus, you will study the latest case law on the interpretation of the Rome Statute and its Rules of Procedure and Evidence and you will evaluate the wider scholarly literature on procedural challenges and complexities. You will critically analyse controversial features such as the exercise of prosecutorial discretion (including decisions not to prosecute in ‘the interests of justice’), victim participation, the preliminary examination process, and assessments of admissibility. You will also examine, from theoretical, comparative and practical perspectives, the legal process of international criminal tribunals vis-à-vis the rights and guarantees for a fair trial as enshrined in international and regional human rights instruments as well as in common law and civil law traditions. By the end of the module you will be able to appraise possible improvements and reforms to international criminal procedure.

Weekly workshop schedule

1. Introduction to the international criminal process
2. The interface of civil law and common law legal systems
3. Jurisdiction and admissibility
4. Initiation of investigations and selection of cases
5. Pre-Trial procedure
6. The trial
7. Appeals and review
8. Evidentiary rules
9. The defence
10. Assessing the role of victims in International Criminal Court proceedings
11. Assessing the practice of plea bargaining and trials in absentia
12. Consolidation and reform

On completion of this module, you should be able to:

• Describe and understand the key procedural stages of a case at the International Criminal Court
• Compare and contrast international criminal procedure across a range of international criminal tribunals
• Analyse controversial features of criminal procedure at the International Criminal Court
• Evaluate potential reforms and improvements that can be made to international criminal procedure

More information

LW7142 -

International Human Rights Law (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about the structure of modern international human rights law and practice, the origins of the international human rights law system, and its relationship to the development of international criminal law. In particular, you will gain an understanding of international human rights law as a response of the international community to serious humanitarian abuses such as genocide, torture, slavery, and enforced disappearance. Drawing on contemporary case studies, this module provides you with a unique opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge on the most pressing issues facing international criminal justice. This will inform your understanding of modern international human rights practice and its capacity to prevent such abuses from taking place.

Outline of seminar topics:
1. The relationship between international human rights law and international criminal law: Nuremberg, Tokyo, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
2. The structure of the modern international human rights system (I): The treaty-based mechanisms
3. The structure of the modern international human rights system (II): The charter-based mechanisms
4. Human rights law as a response to genocide
5. Human rights law as a response to torture
6. Human rights law as a response to enforced disappearance
7. Human rights law as a response to modern slavery
8. Human rights during armed conflict
9. Human rights during belligerent occupation
10. Human rights and the International Criminal Court
11. Contemporary developments (I): Gender-based persecution as a crime against humanity
12. Contemporary developments (II): Mass atrocities in the age of social media

More information

LW7143 -

International Law and Armed Conflict (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about international law as a response to armed conflict – meaning both the law governing the use of force (the jus ad bellum) and concerning the conduct of hostilities (the jus in bello or international humanitarian law (IHL)). This will inform your understanding of what is meant by a ‘war crime’, and how individual criminal responsibility can arise during armed conflict and cases of belligerent occupation. The module will also provide you with an introduction to the practice of modern international humanitarian law and its procedural elements.

Outline of seminar topics:
1. International Law and Armed Conflict: Key Themes
2. The Use of Force (I): Self-defence
3. The Use of Force (II): the Security Council
4. The Use of Force (III): Humanitarian intervention and the ‘responsibility to protect’
5. The Use of Force (IV): The crime of aggression
6. IHL and international armed conflict
7. IHL and non-international armed conflict
8. Combatant status
9. The law of belligerent occupation
10. IHL and the law of targeting
11. IHL and International Criminal Law
12. Rights and obligations of non-state actors under IHL

More information

Any Questions?

Our admissions team will be happy to help. They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901.

Contact Details for Applicants:

bc.applicantservices@northumbria.ac.uk

All information on this course page is accurate at the time of viewing.

Our Campus based courses starting in 2022 and 2023 will be delivered on-campus with supporting online learning content. We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to adjust the delivery of our education accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

On-campus contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with any additional restrictions, which may be imposed by the Government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors. This could potentially mean increased or fully online delivery, should such restrictions on in-person contact time be required.

 

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.


Your Learning Experience find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions - northumbria.ac.uk/terms
Fees and Funding - northumbria.ac.uk/fees
Admissions Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy
Admissions Complaints Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/complaints





Order your prospectus

If you're a UK/EU student and would like to know more about our courses, you can order a copy of our prospectus here.

If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

a sign in front of a crowd
+

Northumbria Open Days

Open Days are a great way for you to get a feel of the University, the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and the course(s) you are interested in.

a person sitting at a table using a laptop
+
a bridge over a body of water
+

Virtual Tour

Get an insight into life at Northumbria at the click of a button! Come and explore our videos and 360 panoramas to immerse yourself in our campuses and get a feel for what it is like studying here using our interactive virtual tour.

Back to top