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The MA Conservation of Fine Art programme (Works of Art on Paper) provides you with  the knowledge and skills necessary for a career as a conservator of works of art on paper.

This postgraduate programme aims to provide you with advanced knowledge and skills in both practice and research in the conservation of works of art on paper. Northumbria University’s Conservation of Fine Art MA is the only Masters programme in the UK that offers  specialisms in both the conservation of Easel Painting and Works of Art on Paper.

The  programme aims to develop your skills in critical awareness, research, ethics and philosophy, art history, conservation science and the care of collections, in addition to honing the meticulous practical skills that are necessary in becoming a professional  conservator.

The combination of meticulous practical skill, a sound knowledge of science, and passion for art and art history will make this Masters programme of interest to those from both a science and arts background.

Integrating a combination  of studio practice, science and art history, the programme covers a range of inter-related subjects. During the course, you will study conservation practice, conservation history, the history of materials and techniques, conservation theory and ethics, conservation science, art history, technical photography, technical art history, preventive conservation and research skills. Additionally, you will be introduced to studio management, the use of methodologies and materials in conservation and good health and safety practice.

Conservation is a multidisciplinary field, continuously informed by developments in cultural heritage, visual arts practice, sustainability, ethics, cultural policy, and materials science. The spirit and day to day practice within the course reflects the professional codes of practice established by the International Institute for Conservation (IIC), the International Council of Museums (ICOM) and United Kingdom Institute for Conservation (ICON). The Conservation of Fine Art MA is a multidisciplinary based programme and on graduation you will leave with the highly specialised knowledge and skills required to  formally enter the conservation profession.

In order to broaden your cultural perspective and enhance your practical learning experience, you will also have the opportunity to carry out a placement in the summer recess. Past students have carried out placements in studios in the UK and globally and have included the British Museum, the Royal Ontario Museum, the National Museum of Australia the Tate and a number of world renowned independent conservation studios.

We welcome applications from students from a wide range of academic backgrounds. Typically, but not exclusively, students will have a first degree in  Fine Art, Art History or one of the Sciences. Students with a science background should be able to demonstrate skill in practical subject area (eg. painting, drawing, printmaking). Students from an art practice background should demonstrate a sound knowledge of science.

You may also be interested in Conservation of Fine Art (Easel Paintings).

If you’d like to browse what other postgraduate programmes we offer or have any queries, please get in touch.

 

What can I expect from the Works of Art on Paper specialism?

The field of fine art paper conservation involves the care, protection, cleaning,  repair and mounting of a wide range of  of objects on paper. These include prints, drawings, watercolours, posters, portrait miniatures, historic wallpapers and three dimensional objects, such as paper costumes and architectural models. As a support for writing, drawing and printing, paper has been in use for more than two thousand years across many world cultures. Thus, objects treated by paper conservators are not limited to western works of art, but also include Persian and Indian miniature paintings, Buddhist Thang-ka paintings, Japanese wood block prints and painted scrolls and and screens from China, Japan and Korea. 

Paper objects are particularly vulnerable to physical damage, light, humidity and air pollution,  as well as contact with harmful materials such as poor quality backing boards and mounts, pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes and ill-fitting frames. Deterioration of paper can also occur through improper handling and from the action of mould and insects. Conservation seeks primarily to stabilise the condition of a work on paper, preserve its physical and aesthetic integrity, and ultimately promote its long-term preservation to facilitate access, study and research. 

Works on paper often represent the most numerous objects in a given collection and therefore, a paper conservator must not only possess the meticulous skill to carry out complex treatment techniques on a wide range of individual items, but also be responsible for the preservation and conservation needs of an entire collection.

Modern and contemporary art on paper also  presents its own unique problems, particularly in regards to the widespread use of modern synthetic paints from the mid-twentieth century onward. This has led to the development of a number of innovative and cross-disciplinary  treatment procedures and collaborative research projects.The scope of the paper conservator’s work has therefore significantly widened in recent years and  the remit of the paper conservator also covers development of  collection care strategies, management of  exhibition and preservation storage standards as well as engaging in research, advocacy, public outreach and training. The profession therefore attracts highly proficient and academic individuals who not only possess significant practical skills but also  strong research and interdisciplinary skills, .

The programme leads to a wide range of opportunities for employment in the heritage sector. 

The MA Conservation of Fine Art programme (Works of Art on Paper) provides you with  the knowledge and skills necessary for a career as a conservator of works of art on paper.

This postgraduate programme aims to provide you with advanced knowledge and skills in both practice and research in the conservation of works of art on paper. Northumbria University’s Conservation of Fine Art MA is the only Masters programme in the UK that offers  specialisms in both the conservation of Easel Painting and Works of Art on Paper.

The  programme aims to develop your skills in critical awareness, research, ethics and philosophy, art history, conservation science and the care of collections, in addition to honing the meticulous practical skills that are necessary in becoming a professional  conservator.

The combination of meticulous practical skill, a sound knowledge of science, and passion for art and art history will make this Masters programme of interest to those from both a science and arts background.

Integrating a combination  of studio practice, science and art history, the programme covers a range of inter-related subjects. During the course, you will study conservation practice, conservation history, the history of materials and techniques, conservation theory and ethics, conservation science, art history, technical photography, technical art history, preventive conservation and research skills. Additionally, you will be introduced to studio management, the use of methodologies and materials in conservation and good health and safety practice.

Conservation is a multidisciplinary field, continuously informed by developments in cultural heritage, visual arts practice, sustainability, ethics, cultural policy, and materials science. The spirit and day to day practice within the course reflects the professional codes of practice established by the International Institute for Conservation (IIC), the International Council of Museums (ICOM) and United Kingdom Institute for Conservation (ICON). The Conservation of Fine Art MA is a multidisciplinary based programme and on graduation you will leave with the highly specialised knowledge and skills required to  formally enter the conservation profession.

In order to broaden your cultural perspective and enhance your practical learning experience, you will also have the opportunity to carry out a placement in the summer recess. Past students have carried out placements in studios in the UK and globally and have included the British Museum, the Royal Ontario Museum, the National Museum of Australia the Tate and a number of world renowned independent conservation studios.

We welcome applications from students from a wide range of academic backgrounds. Typically, but not exclusively, students will have a first degree in  Fine Art, Art History or one of the Sciences. Students with a science background should be able to demonstrate skill in practical subject area (eg. painting, drawing, printmaking). Students from an art practice background should demonstrate a sound knowledge of science.

You may also be interested in Conservation of Fine Art (Easel Paintings).

If you’d like to browse what other postgraduate programmes we offer or have any queries, please get in touch.

 

What can I expect from the Works of Art on Paper specialism?

The field of fine art paper conservation involves the care, protection, cleaning,  repair and mounting of a wide range of  of objects on paper. These include prints, drawings, watercolours, posters, portrait miniatures, historic wallpapers and three dimensional objects, such as paper costumes and architectural models. As a support for writing, drawing and printing, paper has been in use for more than two thousand years across many world cultures. Thus, objects treated by paper conservators are not limited to western works of art, but also include Persian and Indian miniature paintings, Buddhist Thang-ka paintings, Japanese wood block prints and painted scrolls and and screens from China, Japan and Korea. 

Paper objects are particularly vulnerable to physical damage, light, humidity and air pollution,  as well as contact with harmful materials such as poor quality backing boards and mounts, pressure-sensitive adhesive tapes and ill-fitting frames. Deterioration of paper can also occur through improper handling and from the action of mould and insects. Conservation seeks primarily to stabilise the condition of a work on paper, preserve its physical and aesthetic integrity, and ultimately promote its long-term preservation to facilitate access, study and research. 

Works on paper often represent the most numerous objects in a given collection and therefore, a paper conservator must not only possess the meticulous skill to carry out complex treatment techniques on a wide range of individual items, but also be responsible for the preservation and conservation needs of an entire collection.

Modern and contemporary art on paper also  presents its own unique problems, particularly in regards to the widespread use of modern synthetic paints from the mid-twentieth century onward. This has led to the development of a number of innovative and cross-disciplinary  treatment procedures and collaborative research projects.The scope of the paper conservator’s work has therefore significantly widened in recent years and  the remit of the paper conservator also covers development of  collection care strategies, management of  exhibition and preservation storage standards as well as engaging in research, advocacy, public outreach and training. The profession therefore attracts highly proficient and academic individuals who not only possess significant practical skills but also  strong research and interdisciplinary skills, .

The programme leads to a wide range of opportunities for employment in the heritage sector. 

Course Information

Level of Study
Postgraduate

Mode of Study
2 Years Full Time

Department
Arts

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2024

Fees
Fee Information

Modules
Module Information

Funding and Scholarships

Discover the funding options available to you.

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Entry Requirements 2023/24

Standard Entry

Applicants should normally have:

A minimum of a 2:2 honours degree, usually in chemistry, physics, art history or fine art, although applicants from other related fields will also be considered.

Applicants with science backgrounds must have interest in learning about practical art, and arts graduates should have minimum grade B GCSE in Science or may choose to complete a specialist science course (such as Chemistry for Conservators run by IAP in London). This will strengthen their application.

Applicants are required to have sound colour vision, manual dexterity, logical thought and the ability to apply theoretical knowledge to changing practical situations. Applicants should also appreciate the integrity of works of art and have a sensitivity of approach, along with a calm temperament and infinite patience.

International qualifications:

If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English language requirements:

International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.5 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

 *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS.  You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Entry Requirements 2024/25

Standard Entry

Applicants should normally have:

A minimum of a 2:2 honours degree, usually in chemistry, physics, art history or fine art, although applicants from other related fields will also be considered.

Applicants with science backgrounds must have interest in learning about practical art, and arts graduates should have minimum grade B GCSE in Science or may choose to complete a specialist science course (such as Chemistry for Conservators run by IAP in London). This will strengthen their application.

Applicants are required to have sound colour vision, manual dexterity, logical thought and the ability to apply theoretical knowledge to changing practical situations. Applicants should also appreciate the integrity of works of art and have a sensitivity of approach, along with a calm temperament and infinite patience.

International qualifications:

If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English language requirements:

International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.5 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

 *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS.  You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2023/24 Entry

Full UK Fee: £22,500

Full EU Fee: £38,000

Full International Fee: £38,000



Scholarships and Discounts

Click here for UK, EU and International scholarship, fees, and funding information.


ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Fees and Funding 2024/25 Entry

Full UK Fee: £23,500

Full EU Fee: £39,500

Full International Fee: £39,500



Scholarships and Discounts

Discover More about Fees, Scholarships and other Funding options for UK, EU and International applicants.

ADDITIONAL COSTS

TBC

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* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

VA7049 -

Conservation Theory and Practice I: Works of Art on Paper (Core,30 Credits)

You will learn via lectures, demonstrations, practical workshops, set readings and critical discussion groups. This 30-credit module provides a professional approach to core practical skills relevant to your chosen conservation specialism (Works of Art on Paper or Easel Paintings) and the related historic, scientific, preventive, technical and tacit knowledge of materials encountered within professional practice. You will also develop reflective, ethical and critical awareness and a broad range of additional skills relevant to conservation practice including analytical, problem solving, evaluative and written communication skills alongside Health & Safety best practice.

Using real artworks and authentically constructed artefacts, the conservation practical workshops are logically arranged in a sequence that parallels professional practice. This framework also continues throughout the Programme albeit with a new set of interrelated topics.

In support of conservation practice, of the Module is supported by Conservation Science and Art History lectures, which help to contextualise approaches to treatment. Study in Preventive Conservation and Collection Care is also provided through a self-guided series of online lectures.

More information

VA7050 -

Conservation Theory and Practice II: Works of Art on Paper (Core,30 Credits)

You will learn via lectures, demonstrations and activity workshops, set readings and critical discussion groups. This 30-credit module provides a professional approach to core practical skills relevant to your chosen conservation specialism (Works of Art on Paper or Easel Paintings) and the related historic, scientific, technical and tacit knowledge of materials encountered within professional practice. You will also develop ethical and critical awareness and a broad range of additional skills relevant to conservation practice including analytical skills, problem solving, evaluative skills and written and oral communication skills together with an indepth understanding of best practice in Studio Health & Safety.

Using real artworks and authentically constructed facsimiles, the conservation practical workshops are logically arranged in a sequence that parallels professional practice. This framework also continues throughout the Programme albeit with a new set of interrelated topics.

In support of conservation practice of the module includes sessions on Conservation Science and Art History, which help to contextualise conservation approaches and decision making. Study in Preventive Conservation and Collection Care is also provided through a self-guided series of online lectures and an formative interactive test.

More information

YA7000 -

Academic Language Skills for Conservation of Fine Art (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Effective reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.
• Discussing ethical issues in research, and analysing results.
• Describing bias and limitations of research.

More information

VA7044 -

Conservation Project-Dissertation (Core,60 Credits)

You will have the opportunity to demonstrate your abilities as reflective practitioners and critical scholars by examining and engaging with a topic broadly of relevance to the field. The module is designed to allow you flexibility of approach and outcome, reflecting the multi-disciplinary context of conservation and diversity of subject backgrounds with which each of you enters the programme. You will have access to a series of presentations on research skills which will enrich your methodological training for the undertaking of this module (see ‘How will I learn on this module’ for further details).

You will select the form of dissertation that best suits your own individual research and practice interests, choosing from:
1. A literature-based research project-dissertation, requiring a synthesis, critical review, exploration and further development of an academic issue or professional topic - using existing academic and scholarly literature and, if relevant, the interpretation of primary or historic sources. You may also conduct qualitative or quantitative research enquiries within this format.

2. An applied research project-dissertation, requiring a technical or practice-led exploration of a problem centred enquiry, combined with scholarly review of relevant knowledge. The applied dissertation normally involves you in developing an evidence base and interpreting primary data, you may undertake practical experimentation or scientific analysis, or may use secondary analysis of existing data. You must apply to do the applied project dissertation, which must be pre-approved via Learning contract by the module tutor and supervision teams. All students may complete a project-dissertation based on secondary literature or on qualitative or qualitative analysis.


The project-dissertation enables you to show originality in researching a question which has to date been little explored. It also enables you to demonstrate project and time management skills in terms of completing a major project to deadline.

More information

VA7051 -

Conservation Theory and Practice III: Works of Art on Paper (Core,30 Credits)

This immersive and challenging 30-credit module continues to provide a professional approach to core practical skills relevant to your chosen conservation specialism (Works of Art on Paper or Easel Paintings) and the related historic, scientific, historic, technical and tacit knowledge of materials encountered within professional practice. With increasing complexity you will further develop ethical and critical awareness and a broad range of additional skills relevant to conservation practice including analytical, problem solving, evaluative, oral and written communication skills alongside Health & Safety best practice. Science, an integral part in understanding the deterioration and behaviour of artist and conservation materials is supported throughout this module through labs and workshops, seminars or group tutorials. Students will have an opportunity to explore materials using a range of analytical methods commonly used in the assessment of historic artefacts.
A greater emphasis is also placed in this module on independent research, professional advocacy, project management skills and situating conservation in relation to current and emerging international/global practices and debates. Following on from the framework adopted in Year 1, the conservation practical workshops are logically arranged in a sequence that mirrors actual practice.

More information

VA7052 -

Conservation Theory and Practice IV: Works of Art on Paper (Core,30 Credits)

This immersive and challenging 30-credit module continues to provide a professional approach to core practical skills relevant to your chosen conservation specialism (Works of Art on Paper or Easel Paintings) and the related historic, scientific, historic, technical and tacit knowledge of materials encountered within professional practice. With increasing complexity you will further develop ethical and critical awareness and a broad range of additional skills relevant to conservation practice including analytical, problem solving, evaluative, oral and written communication skills alongside Health & Safety best practice. Science, an integral part in understanding the deterioration and behaviour of artist and conservation materials is supported throughout this module through labs and workshops, seminars or group tutorials. Students will have an opportunity to explore materials using a range of analytical methods commonly used in the assessment of historic artefacts.
A greater emphasis is also placed in this module on independent research, professional advocacy, project management skills and situating conservation in relation to current and emerging international/global practices and debates. Following on from the framework adopted in Year 1 and in Semester 1 Year 2, the conservation practical workshops are logically arranged in a sequence that mirrors actual practice.

More information

YA7000 -

Academic Language Skills for Conservation of Fine Art (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Effective reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.
• Discussing ethical issues in research, and analysing results.
• Describing bias and limitations of research.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

VA7049 -

Conservation Theory and Practice I: Works of Art on Paper (Core,30 Credits)

You will learn via lectures, demonstrations, practical workshops, set readings and critical discussion groups. This 30-credit module provides a professional approach to core practical skills relevant to your chosen conservation specialism (Works of Art on Paper or Easel Paintings) and the related historic, scientific, preventive, technical and tacit knowledge of materials encountered within professional practice. You will also develop reflective, ethical and critical awareness and a broad range of additional skills relevant to conservation practice including analytical, problem solving, evaluative and written communication skills alongside Health & Safety best practice.

Using real artworks and authentically constructed artefacts, the conservation practical workshops are logically arranged in a sequence that parallels professional practice. This framework also continues throughout the Programme albeit with a new set of interrelated topics.

In support of conservation practice, of the Module is supported by Conservation Science and Art History lectures, which help to contextualise approaches to treatment. Study in Preventive Conservation and Collection Care is also provided through a self-guided series of online lectures.

More information

VA7050 -

Conservation Theory and Practice II: Works of Art on Paper (Core,30 Credits)

You will learn via lectures, demonstrations and activity workshops, set readings and critical discussion groups. This 30-credit module provides a professional approach to core practical skills relevant to your chosen conservation specialism (Works of Art on Paper or Easel Paintings) and the related historic, scientific, technical and tacit knowledge of materials encountered within professional practice. You will also develop ethical and critical awareness and a broad range of additional skills relevant to conservation practice including analytical skills, problem solving, evaluative skills and written and oral communication skills together with an indepth understanding of best practice in Studio Health & Safety.

Using real artworks and authentically constructed facsimiles, the conservation practical workshops are logically arranged in a sequence that parallels professional practice. This framework also continues throughout the Programme albeit with a new set of interrelated topics.

In support of conservation practice of the module includes sessions on Conservation Science and Art History, which help to contextualise conservation approaches and decision making. Study in Preventive Conservation and Collection Care is also provided through a self-guided series of online lectures and an formative interactive test.

More information

YA7000 -

Academic Language Skills for Conservation of Fine Art (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Effective reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.
• Discussing ethical issues in research, and analysing results.
• Describing bias and limitations of research.

More information

VA7044 -

Conservation Project-Dissertation (Core,60 Credits)

You will have the opportunity to demonstrate your abilities as reflective practitioners and critical scholars by examining and engaging with a topic broadly of relevance to the field. The module is designed to allow you flexibility of approach and outcome, reflecting the multi-disciplinary context of conservation and diversity of subject backgrounds with which each of you enters the programme. You will have access to a series of presentations on research skills which will enrich your methodological training for the undertaking of this module (see ‘How will I learn on this module’ for further details).

You will select the form of dissertation that best suits your own individual research and practice interests, choosing from:
1. A literature-based research project-dissertation, requiring a synthesis, critical review, exploration and further development of an academic issue or professional topic - using existing academic and scholarly literature and, if relevant, the interpretation of primary or historic sources. You may also conduct qualitative or quantitative research enquiries within this format.

2. An applied research project-dissertation, requiring a technical or practice-led exploration of a problem centred enquiry, combined with scholarly review of relevant knowledge. The applied dissertation normally involves you in developing an evidence base and interpreting primary data, you may undertake practical experimentation or scientific analysis, or may use secondary analysis of existing data. You must apply to do the applied project dissertation, which must be pre-approved via Learning contract by the module tutor and supervision teams. All students may complete a project-dissertation based on secondary literature or on qualitative or qualitative analysis.


The project-dissertation enables you to show originality in researching a question which has to date been little explored. It also enables you to demonstrate project and time management skills in terms of completing a major project to deadline.

More information

VA7051 -

Conservation Theory and Practice III: Works of Art on Paper (Core,30 Credits)

This immersive and challenging 30-credit module continues to provide a professional approach to core practical skills relevant to your chosen conservation specialism (Works of Art on Paper or Easel Paintings) and the related historic, scientific, historic, technical and tacit knowledge of materials encountered within professional practice. With increasing complexity you will further develop ethical and critical awareness and a broad range of additional skills relevant to conservation practice including analytical, problem solving, evaluative, oral and written communication skills alongside Health & Safety best practice. Science, an integral part in understanding the deterioration and behaviour of artist and conservation materials is supported throughout this module through labs and workshops, seminars or group tutorials. Students will have an opportunity to explore materials using a range of analytical methods commonly used in the assessment of historic artefacts.
A greater emphasis is also placed in this module on independent research, professional advocacy, project management skills and situating conservation in relation to current and emerging international/global practices and debates. Following on from the framework adopted in Year 1, the conservation practical workshops are logically arranged in a sequence that mirrors actual practice.

More information

VA7052 -

Conservation Theory and Practice IV: Works of Art on Paper (Core,30 Credits)

This immersive and challenging 30-credit module continues to provide a professional approach to core practical skills relevant to your chosen conservation specialism (Works of Art on Paper or Easel Paintings) and the related historic, scientific, historic, technical and tacit knowledge of materials encountered within professional practice. With increasing complexity you will further develop ethical and critical awareness and a broad range of additional skills relevant to conservation practice including analytical, problem solving, evaluative, oral and written communication skills alongside Health & Safety best practice. Science, an integral part in understanding the deterioration and behaviour of artist and conservation materials is supported throughout this module through labs and workshops, seminars or group tutorials. Students will have an opportunity to explore materials using a range of analytical methods commonly used in the assessment of historic artefacts.
A greater emphasis is also placed in this module on independent research, professional advocacy, project management skills and situating conservation in relation to current and emerging international/global practices and debates. Following on from the framework adopted in Year 1 and in Semester 1 Year 2, the conservation practical workshops are logically arranged in a sequence that mirrors actual practice.

More information

YA7000 -

Academic Language Skills for Conservation of Fine Art (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Effective reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.
• Discussing ethical issues in research, and analysing results.
• Describing bias and limitations of research.

More information

Any Questions?

Our Applicant Services team will be happy to help.  They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901 or by using our Contact Form.



Accessibility and Student Inclusion

Northumbria University is committed to developing an inclusive, diverse and accessible campus and wider University community and are determined to ensure that opportunities we provide are open to all.

We are proud to work in partnership with AccessAble to provide Detailed Access Guides to our buildings and facilities across our City, Coach Lane and London Campuses. A Detailed Access Guide lets you know what access will be like when you visit somewhere. It looks at the route you will use getting in and what is available inside. All guides have Accessibility Symbols that give you a quick overview of what is available, and photographs to show you what to expect. The guides are produced by trained surveyors who visit our campuses annually to ensure you have trusted and accurate information.

You can use Northumbria’s AccessAble Guides anytime to check the accessibility of a building or facility and to plan your routes and journeys. Search by location, building or accessibility feature to find the information you need. 

We are dedicated to helping students who may require additional support during their student journey and offer 1-1 advice and guidance appropriate to individual requirements. If you feel you may need additional support you can find out more about what we offer here where you can also contact us with any questions you may have:

Accessibility support

Student Inclusion support




All information is accurate at the time of sharing. 

Full time Courses are primarily delivered via on-campus face to face learning but could include elements of online learning. Most courses run as planned and as promoted on our website and via our marketing materials, but if there are any substantial changes (as determined by the Competition and Markets Authority) to a course or there is the potential that course may be withdrawn, we will notify all affected applicants as soon as possible with advice and guidance regarding their options. It is also important to be aware that optional modules listed on course pages may be subject to change depending on uptake numbers each year.  

Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with possible restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors if this is deemed necessary in future.

 

Useful Links

Find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions
northumbria.ac.uk/terms

Fees and Funding
northumbria.ac.uk/fees

Admissions Policy
northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy

Admissions Complaints Policy
northumbria.ac.uk/complaints



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Northumbria Open Days

Open Days are a great way for you to get a feel of the University, the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and the course(s) you are interested in.

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NU World Virtual Tours
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Virtual Tour

Get an insight into life at Northumbria at the click of a button! Come and explore our videos and 360 panoramas to immerse yourself in our campuses and get a feel for what it is like studying here using our interactive virtual tour.

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