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Are you passionate about theatre and performance? Interested in issues like the climate crisis, anti-racism, trans rights – and keen to use the arts to bring about positive change? Our new BA (Hons) in Theatre and Performance could be your springboard to a broad range of exciting careers.

This course will help you become an independent thinker and innovative practitioner. You'll not only be able to engage with the world critically, imaginatively and creatively to secure your own career ambitions, but also actively help solve complex social, political and cultural challenges. It's your chance to go beyond traditional understanding of theatre and performance - to test and push boundaries – and learn to be a leader.

The programme may be grounded in the North East, but it takes an international and intercultural approach through partnerships across the vibrant Newcastle Gateshead area. This includes working with theatre and performance practitioners, cultural venues like Northern Stage, Live Theatre and the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, as well as organisations such as schools, care homes and local authorities.

You'll explore the world's big challenges by innovating through your own creative practice. So, whether your role is as performer, director, writer, designer, critic or producer, this course will support you to thrive – whether working as a creative individual or collaboratively to stage timely, ambitious and culturally aware performances.

Between your second and final years, you can undertake a year-long sandwich work placement. This placement will provide an opportunity to further develop your professional skills and knowledge through working in practice. There's also the option to apply for a year of study abroad.

Students value the Northumbria approach with 93% saying that they were satisfied overall with their course (National Student Survey 2018)

Course Information

UCAS Code
W405

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Arts

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2020 or September 2021

Fee Information

Module Information

Student Life / #IAmNorthumbria

Discover more about life in Newcastle and studying at Northumbria.

Department / Arts

From creating fine art to conserving it; from animation to film, theatre and television, through to arts management and teaching, our Arts department is a dynamic and stimulating environment to study in.

Book an Open Day / Experience Theatre and Performance BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Theatre and Performance. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Our learning modes are dynamic and engaging. Developing your practice lies at the heart of the course, for example through working with live briefs from creative industry partners and local employers. Stimulating workshops, lectures, seminars and performances will encourage you to work, think and perform both independently and collaboratively.

At Level 4 you'll assemble key building blocks through practical modules that encourage you to question your own pre-conceived views, as well as explore the big and urgent ideas that drive theatre and performance. You'll encounter all of the assessment formats you'll work with later at higher levels. These include solo and collaborative performances, Practice Research Projects, research presentations and essays, your response to live briefs plus 'viva voce' oral exams and final year dissertation. Our expectations in terms of research skills, critical thinking and communication are embedded throughout.

Level 5 builds up your autonomy as a self-starter, independent practitioner and thinker. Core modules will introduce you to the exciting and diverse research expertise of our staff, further evolving important research and practical skills. Assessments offer you scope to investigate areas that really interest you within open assessment briefs.

Optional modules at Levels 5 and 6 build directly on our research-rich environment, with Level 6 anchored around a staff-supervised dissertation you can complete in writing or partly through practice with a 50-50 split. An optional, supervised performance project invites you to form a mini theatre company, put projects together over the year and take them out to an audience. As the course nears its conclusion a choice of modules address moving on to the world of work.

Drama

Book an Open Day / Experience Theatre and Performance BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Theatre and Performance. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Throughout your course, you'll be taught by internationally recognised, research-active academic staff. Drawing on their backgrounds in all areas of the performing arts, your teachers bring a wealth of professional and research experience to the world of theatre and performance at Northumbria.

You'll also benefit from input from industry experts – from creative producers to professional directors – happy to share their knowledge and insights to inspire your current course activities and future direction.

Find out more here about tutor research areas.

Book an Open Day / Experience Theatre and Performance BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Theatre and Performance. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

You'll learn in dedicated studio spaces featuring state-of-the-art facilities, as well as in professional exhibition spaces. Our onsite theatre is kitted out with high quality equipment, including portable sound.

The programme also makes the most of technologies to support your learning and assessment throughout, and you'll be taught from the start to use them effectively. Our Blackboard Virtual Learning Environment is accessible 24/7, where you'll find all your programme and module materials. It also offers access to our virtual classrooms through Blackboard Collaborate, which enables you to simultaneously engage with both tutors and fellow students. To further help you when working off campus, the online University

Student Desktop provides 24/7 access to the software and library resources you'll need to study successfully.

To aid research-rich learning, each module provides access to e-reading lists which directly link you to core online reading materials. You'll also be able to engage in your own independent research via our online library with its comprehensive e-book, e-journal and wider learning resources. You'll submit written assessments and receive feedback via our E-Assessment tool.

Additional support is available via our 24/7 Student Portal - for example around IT, Ask4Help, welfare, learning and careers queries. 

Book an Open Day / Experience Theatre and Performance BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Theatre and Performance. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

BA (Hons) Theatre and Performance has been designed from the ground up to be research-rich but always immersed in a practical learning environment. You'll engage directly with the research and practice specialisms of our internationally renowned staff to develop your critical thinking and support your journey to becoming an independent researcher, creative thinker and innovative practitioner. This is embedded at all course levels. As well as building your own research expertise, you'll encounter the exciting work of your tutors and others throughout your studies.

Following an introduction to research skills in your first year, you'll start developing them to independently and collaboratively embark upon your own research – learning to communicate your insights through performances, essays or presentations. This leads up to the Performance Dissertation module in the final year: a research project you design, with supervisor support, to investigate the things you're most passionate about. The optional Performance Project, which offers the opportunity to form a small company to design and develop a performance, is similarly research focused.

Book an Open Day / Experience Theatre and Performance BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Theatre and Performance. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Developed in consultation with a panel of creative industry professionals, this new BA (Hons) Theatre and Performance expands career horizons by developing your professional skills and knowledge through working in practice. Not only will it equip you to take on theatre-based performance roles, but also set you up for employment in a wide range of other areas. This could involve performing on stage or forming your own performance company, or working in socially engaged and community contexts. Developing a career as a producer or in arts administration, events production, marketing and communications. Or moving into teaching, further study or training. 

Northumbria students have gone on to work with diverse employers, including local authorities, Northern Stage, Live Theatre, the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art and theatres nationwide. In fact, one of our graduates founded Newcastle's highly successful Alphabetti Theatre, championing original work from emerging artists.

From the beginning you'll engage directly with our professional connections and partnerships through skills training, work experience and other opportunities in professional settings. Working with regional, national, and international organisations, you'll develop transferable skills favoured by employers including networking, negotiation, communication, evaluation, co-production and reflective analysis.

For those who wish to pursue their knowledge and interest’s further, we provide a masters course in MA Theatre and Performance.

The university's Graduate Futures careers service provides in-person and online career and employability support for five years after you graduate.

 

Book an Open Day / Experience Theatre and Performance BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Theatre and Performance. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Entry Requirements 2020/21

Standard Entry

120 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

You will be required to attend an audition.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants should have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2020/21 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,500

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Scholarships and Discounts

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.


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* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

TP4001 -

Big Ideas in Theatre and Performance (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the ‘big ideas’ that drive the study of theatre and performance. This is inclusive of critical approaches to performance, class, gender, race, and queer theory in relation to practices such as acting, dance, direction, and stage design.
Drawing on examples of current and historical practices in commercial and fringe theatres, as well as performances that happen in the wider world, you will learn to articulate your own foundational approaches to critical thinking and performance analysis. The overall purpose of the module is to prepare you to ask big questions of your own practices, politics, and critical awareness as you progress through your studies. In this regard, the module feeds directly into a sister module in the second semester, which is focused on ‘urgent ideas’, as well as being the building blocks for your research and critical thinking skills that will be the foundation of your studies and future careers.

It is also a chance for you to find out about the research specialisms of the staff and become part of the Northumbria performance research community. Sessions will be led by members of the staff team to allow you an opportunity to engage directly with leading theatre and performance researchers.

More information

TP4002 -

Theatre and Performance Encounters (Core,40 Credits)

This module has two interrelated strands: making encounters and critiquing encounters. Central to this is hands on experience collaborating with your peers in the creation of theatre and performance practice. Alongside your own creative processes, you will be introduced to the breadth of performance works taking place in the contemporary moment, both locally and globally. These dual strands ask; how do we make theatre now? Where do we encounter performance? How do we collaborate in the creation of artistic work? This will include attending performances at local arts venues in the North East, such as Live Theatre and Northern Stage, as well as watching recorded performances. The combination of making your own theatrical encounters, while encountering the work of professionals is what makes this module a fundamental and formative aspect of your introduction to Newcastle and the region. In that regard, you will be introduced to ‘practical thinking’ that challenges divisions between practice and theory through workshops based on key theatre and performance practitioners. This (indicatively) is inclusive of approaches to dramatic and postdramatic theatre, laboratory theatres, and design-led performance. The module concludes with the presentation of scratch performances that investigate your approach to making performance encounters and the submission of a critically informed reflection and critiques of your encounters with professional performance work.

More information

TP4003 -

Performance Explorations (Core,40 Credits)

Through an exploration of current performance making strategies and approaches you will begin to develop an understanding of yourself as an individual artist within the theatrical ensemble, learning techniques, skills and processes of the performer-creator. You will experience and develop an understanding of the potential for the physical body onstage and a growing awareness and expanding knowledge of the artistic possibilities of both text and movement. You will gain a greater knowledge of your own body and develop processes to support both physical expressiveness and safe physical practice.

This module will also offer an introduction to the working processes of staging performance practice. You will be introduced to these processes through staff-led practical workshops on the different methods and techniques of staging. This is inclusive of approaches to directing, dramaturgy, scenography, and choreography, along with the techniques associated with stage management, digital tech, leading rehearsals, and design processes. The overall aim is to familiarise you with different production roles and prepare you for taking a lead in staging your own performances while at Northumbria and beyond.

More information

TP4004 -

Urgent ideas in Theatre and Performance (Core,20 Credits)

Following on from Big ideas in Theatre and Performance, this module asks you to consider the ‘urgent ideas’ that will inform the possible futures of theatre and performance. This module will challenge you to consider how factors such as climate crisis and decolonial thinking will shape performance making processes and perspectives. It will introduce you to examples of theatre and performance practice that seek to engage with urgent ideas, such as how practitioners approach notions of social justice, anti-racism, digital thinking, climate justice, decolonising, along with trans* and non-binary perspectives. The overall aim is to ensure that you are ready to ask challenging questions of yourself and your peers and offer an initial step towards becoming future leaders in the cultural sector.

As with the sister module in the first semester, sessions will be led by members of the staff team to allow you an opportunity to engage directly with leading theatre and performance researchers and induct you in the Northumbria performance research community.

More information

YA5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Arts (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

TP5001 -

Arguments for Theatre and Performance (Core,20 Credits)

This theory led module is focused on the social, critical, and ethical ‘challenges’ that theatre and performance makers face in the 21st century. Through a series of lectures and seminars, you will be provided with examples of critical arguments that allow you to consider theatre and performance from plural and sometimes competing perspectives. The overall aim is to give you a grounding in developing your own independent arguments on difficult, challenging, or ethically complex subjects such as city resilience, population growth, the fourth industrial revolution, class and equality, and climate justice through the frameworks such as cultural materialism, doughnut economics, Global North philosophies (universalism, liberalism, poststructuralism), Global South philosophies (pluriversal thinking, co-presence, rasa theory), and queer radicalism.

More information

TP5002 -

Contemporary Theatre Making (Core,20 Credits)

This practically led module will explore the processes and practices of contemporary theatre making from a number of different perspectives, drawing on a range of international practitioners. The module will help you to locate your work in relation to the history of key theatre practitioners from the late-20th and early-21st centuries. You will engage with practices such as verbatim theatre, immersive or physical performance, along with the work of (e.g.) Forced Entertainment, Augusto Boal, or Jatinder Verma. In doing so, the module asks you to think about what ‘theatre’ is (form and context) in practice. That is, through practical exploration (in studios, in urban contexts, in homes or in online environments) the module explores how we create theatre and the importance of understanding theatre-making as an active practice and ongoing cultural, political and critical process in the world.

More information

TP5003 -

Performance, Politics and Power in Contemporary Society (Optional,20 Credits)

This module explores some of the most critical questions of our time, asking why particular theatre productions, plays, and performance traditions are important now and how they might be engaged in understanding, critiquing and remaking the world around us. Building on the foundational work completed in year one, this research driven module will help you to develop and hone your performance analysis and research skills. Through tutor facilitated discussions, debates and in-class research activities, you will draw on research materials from key academic and political debates; this may include critical race theory, post-colonial studies, queer theory, disability studies, performance theory, feminism and gender studies, etc. By studying a wide range of theatrical texts and performances, you will have the opportunity to understand the interrelations between innovations in theatre and performance practices and the wider social and political contexts from which they emerge. That is, this module asks you: why should we make theatre and performance now?

More information

TP5004 -

Applied Theatre Practice (Optional,20 Credits)

As a staff research led module, you will work in close collaboration with a client organisation to explore the role of the applied theatre practitioner. Concentrating on the needs of the chosen organisation and the aligned expertise of staff, you will learn skills and understandings appropriate to their audience and/or participant group. You will further develop your ability to plan, research, make and evaluate your performance work. This will involve interrogating a variety of performance styles and devising methodologies. This practice will be undertaken in dialogue with your tutors and with representatives of the client organisation, who will help you explore your relationship with the audience and the art form. You will be encouraged to investigate the relationship between the performer and the participant, the staged and the non-staged, and how theatre making functions in spaces other than conventional theatres. The module will familiarise you with the work of some key practitioners and movements within the applied field, enabling you to appreciate how your individual experience relates to the wider cultural arena.

More information

TP5005 -

Investigating Theatre and Performance (Core,20 Credits)

Building on Arguments for Theatre and Performance, in this module you will develop skills in research methods that will be vital for your independent research in the final year. While still focused on the ‘grand challenges’ of the 21st century, you will be introduced to research methodologies and methods which might include areas such as practice research, documentary theatre, archival research, dialogical performance, performance analysis, interviews, ethnographic approaches, and walking performance. This module is designed as Dissertation preparation and, in that regard, it addresses issues relating to diverse approaches to the production of knowledge, but also provides students with practical and critical skills associated with particular methods of doing performance research.

More information

TP5006 -

Performance and the City (Core,20 Credits)

This practically led module grounds your performance making within the creative, political, and cultural challenges of ‘the city’. Based on a tutor designed brief, you will be encouraged to test and challenge the limits of theatre and performance by investigating the role performances play in representing, reflecting upon and interrogating city cultures. The brief may include site-specific work in the NewcastleGateshead area, working with a play that explores city life, a box of objects that relate to urban contexts, or another creative stimulus for approaching a devising process. This creative process will be complemented with staff-led workshops on practices such as contemporary dance, directing challenging topics, creating scenographic atmospheres, site-responsive performance, performer-audience relations, or psychophysical acting. Building on your experiences at first year and in TP5002 Contemporary Theatre Making, you will continue to develop your practical devising skills as part of small group performances. You will have the opportunity to be creative, to experiment, and to put theory into practice to make performances located in venues such as theatre studios, museums, art galleries or with found places.

More information

TP5007 -

Performance and Digital Cultures (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn how digital cultures are investigated through theatre and performance practices. The notion of ‘digital culture’ is explored in an expansive way to consider how ‘digital perspectives’ are represented in live performance works, along with providing tools for representation (projection, networks, etc.). This is inclusive of approaches to mixed reality, gaming theatre, and online performances along with plays that take ‘the internet’ as their subject (such as Tim Price’s Teh Internet is Serious Business and Jennifer Haley’s The Nether). As a research informed module, the interests and specialisms of the staff will guide the workshops included each year. The overall aim is to prepare you to identify, critique, and stage timely performances that investigate the social, aesthetic and political impacts of digital cultures (whether local or global) beyond a focus on the technology alone.

More information

TP5008 -

Performer Training: Practitioner Perspectives (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will be introduced to how select practitioners have approached the training of actors and performers. Informed by staff research interests, this module will develop your practical and theoretical understanding of how contemporary performers prepare for performance. This is inclusive of the techniques associated with (for example) Sandford Meisner, Jerzy Grotowski, Yoshi Oida, Freddie Hendricks, and Patsy Rodenburg. These techniques will be studied in workshop sessions and applied to scripted scenes. The module acts as an introduction to these performer training perspectives and offers the opportunity to expand your performance skillset, while also exploring your personal creative interests and identity. You will learn how to apply these techniques autonomously, making informed and interest driven choices on the types of material you will perform and which techniques you will use in your creative process.

More information

AD5001 -

Arts Work Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks). You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Specific learning will depend on the nature of the employer and the placement secured. In general terms, this module is an opportunity to gain significant experience of industry practice, and to learn professional, role-specific skills ‘on the job’. It’s also a great opportunity to improve transferable skills such as communication, interpersonal skills, personal organisation, time management, presentation, commercial awareness, entrepreneurial skills, branding, and professional conduct generally; and to enhance your CV and personal portfolio. Students who have carried out placements in previous years often describe it as a transformative experience; they report greatly increased personal confidence both in terms of launching their future careers, and in returning to their final year of study. Your employer will agree in advance what your learning is likely to include, and will help you reflect on this learning at the end of your placement.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AD5002 -

Arts Study Abroad Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AT5004 -

Year in International Business (This is made up of 5 modules studied in Newcastle (Semester 1) & Amsterdam (Semester 2) (Optional,120 Credits)

This overarching module descriptor covers the Year in International Business which is made up of 5 modules which students study in Newcastle (semester 1) and Amsterdam (semester 2).

This additional year of studies has been designed to develop students’ business awareness and their soft skills through a semester of study in the UK followed by engagement in studying in Amsterdam and working on real business projects to further enhance and develop this knowledge, skills and attributes.

Semester 1 in the UK comprises three 20-credit modules aimed at students new to business and management, which also equips the students for a semester in Amsterdam, working in teams on a “real-world”, client facing project. Of the modules studies in Semester 1 provide students with the “soft”, “analytical” and “project management” skills necessary to embark on a “real-world” client-centred consultancy project in Semester 2. In Semester 2, students will work move to Amsterdam and study two modules on Northumbria licensed premises. The first module, Group Business Consultancy Project, is a Level 5 40 credit Consultancy Project providing a supported and challenging experience with real business supervised by Northumbria and possibly Dutch academics. The final module complements the development of business knowledge and application through a contextualised consideration of International Business. This will also add to the Business Consultancy experience, thereby guaranteeing a coherent business experience.

The modules are outlined below:

Semester 1
HR9505 Managing People at Work (20 credits)
SM9511 Global Business Environment (20 credits)
AF5022 Financial Decision Making (20 credits)

Semester 2
AT5000 Digital Business (20)
AT5001 Group Business Consultancy Project (40 credits)

In semester 1, students will learn in an environment aligned to that of business students on full time programmes. A mixture of large group and small group sessions will take place. In semester 2, in accordance with the experiential learning pedagogical approach in the Business Clinic operated at Newcastle Business School, the group consultancy work will involve students working in groups, facilitated by academics but also independently and amongst their peers in collaborative project work to provide real business consultancy. Assessment has been developed in accordance with Northumbria’s Assessment for Learning principles including a broad mix of assessment appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed and with opportunities for formative feedback.

A student who passes all modules will, on successful completion of their undergraduate programme of study, have the title “(Year in International Business UK and Amsterdam)” added to their degree award title. Students who do not pass 120 credits will have those modules that have been completed recorded on their transcript.

More information

TP6001 -

Performance Dissertation (Core,40 Credits)

This module enables you to conduct significant independent study, supported by a supervisor and resulting in either written or part written/part practical outcomes. Your choice of Dissertation topic may arise from a specific theatre and performance interest developed through theoretical and/or practical experience on the degree in previous years, and/or from extracurricular or professional contexts. The module is flexible to your interests, passions and future directions; as such, tutors will work with you to help you develop topics that are exciting, innovative and engaging.

Your topic should have appropriate content and parameters and should be designed to demonstrate your research, analytical, and evaluative skills as appropriate to your project design. The overall purpose of this module is to ensure that you have an opportunity to realize an independent research project that speaks to your particular interests and that will embed skills and expertise relevant to further study at MA and PhD level and to the world of work.

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TP6002 -

Performance Project (Optional,40 Credits)

In this optional module, you will form theatre and performance companies, each with a clear identity and purpose. You will develop appropriate working practices that are grounded in relevant processes from the programme, indicatively: making, thinking, questioning, collaborating and sharing. You will create specific events that are focused towards life and work beyond university, or in further study. In so doing, you will engage a select set of specific practices appropriate to that project, but which are likely to involve mapping existing practice, identifying starting points for a company and project, devising and developing appropriate making practices, working as peer mentors and with peer-mentors, reflecting and rethinking, refining and rehearsing, selecting and focusing, performing and presenting. Companies may work in a range of areas, in discussion with staff and subject to resources. These may, indicatively, include: Performance, Events, and Workshops (e.g. offering training for companies, organisations, community groups, etc.).

More information

TP6003 -

Performer Training: Future Practices (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research driven exploration on performer training; building on the foundations set by practitioners from the late 20th and early 21st centuries you will investigate new modes of performer training and think through the ways that training processes and practices may need innovating for the contemporary world. Working with staff on their specialist areas of research and practice, the precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised collaboratively with your tutor(s) to develop from their expertise. You will situate their own practical methods of preparing for performance in the context of the 21st century before moving on to begin developing your own performer training ‘vocabularies’. The overall aim of this module is to challenge you to consider alternative methods of performer training and prepare you for advising, developing and honing performance techniques that reflect the ethics of contemporary and future cultural sectors.

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TP6004 -

Popular Performance (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research driven exploration on popular performance. The precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised in line with staff expertise and interests. ‘Popular performance’ is defined in broad terms and is inclusive of stand up, cabaret, clowning, musical comedy, panto, etc. The module is designed to enable you to explore and develop solo (or duo) modes of popular performance. Situating your work within relevant social and political contexts, the overarching goal is to create a proposal for material that you could perform in front of a live audience in a relevant popular performance setting. This proposal will likely be shared as a short performance, but can also be submitted in a range of media (video, etc.) as agreed by the module leader. You will be able to utilise this material not just during the assessment but also indicate where else you might adapt and transport it.

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TP6005 -

Performance and the Politics of Fear (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research-led exploration of the place of performance (social and aesthetic) in relation to contemporary and plural contexts of the ‘politics of fear’. The precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised in line with staff expertise and interests. It considers how contemporary (western) social discourse (particularly as represented in the news media) is preoccupied with narratives of fear or anxiety: of the other, of terrorism, of the collapse of capitalism, of pandemics, of anti-social behaviour and violence, of the dumbing down of education standards, of the disintegration of community, of the rise of consumerism and ‘unthinking’ neoliberalism, for example. Meanwhile, the history of performance since Plato holds at its centre a complex and powerful anxiety about and mistrust of representation. Through recourse to critical theory, political and medical histories, psychoanalysis and philosophy you will investigate the philosophical, political and socio-cultural nature and social function of performance and representation as it relates to contemporary questions of fear, anxiety and ‘dis-ease’.

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TP6006 -

Digital Futures (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research driven exploration of future artistic, social and political opportunities and uncertainties presented by the ‘digital century’. The precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised in line with staff expertise and interests. You will consider in what ways theatre and performance cultures will shift in the next 50 years and propose creative ideas in preparation for a leading role in the cultural sector. You might look at the importance of live encounters in digital futures, or at processes of performance for digital recordings, or the ethics of digital representations that last ‘forever’ such as ‘digital death’ and digital footprints. Theoretical and cultural influences may include the impact of fourth wave feminism, posthumanism, online activism, artificial intelligence, and other responses or rejections of digitally-orientated frameworks. In response to a provocation provided by staff, the overall focus will be on speculating future contexts, opportunities and interdisciplinary practices that will confront practitioners in the digital century.

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TP6007 -

Advanced Applied Practice (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research rich exploration of the future of applied theatre and performance practices. In response to a provocation provided by staff, the overall focus will be preparing you to pitch how theatre and performance can be applied in the interests of social transformation with widely different intentions. The precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised in line with staff expertise and interests. The goal is to be critically reflective on the role of applied theatre and performance and consider the ethical challenges and nuances implicit in many of these culturally diverse contexts. This can include the role of applied theatre techniques for educational outcomes, reduction of behaviours deemed challenging, or improvements in health, along with a focus on ‘affects’ such as intangible feelings and impulses.

More information

TP6008 -

Performance and Creative Economies (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research-led exploration of theatre and performance commissioning, funding cultures and venue programming policies. The precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised in line with staff expertise and interests. The overall aim is to offer you an insight into the role of producers, programmers, and funders in preparation for developing competitive funding applications post-graduation. As a further focus on graduate destinations, as part of the module you will complete a live funding application (e.g. Arts Council England or Creative Scotland) that, with the support of staff feedback, can be submitted to open competitions and potentially gain funding for your graduate practice.

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Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

TP4001 -

Big Ideas in Theatre and Performance (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the ‘big ideas’ that drive the study of theatre and performance. This is inclusive of critical approaches to performance, class, gender, race, and queer theory in relation to practices such as acting, dance, direction, and stage design.
Drawing on examples of current and historical practices in commercial and fringe theatres, as well as performances that happen in the wider world, you will learn to articulate your own foundational approaches to critical thinking and performance analysis. The overall purpose of the module is to prepare you to ask big questions of your own practices, politics, and critical awareness as you progress through your studies. In this regard, the module feeds directly into a sister module in the second semester, which is focused on ‘urgent ideas’, as well as being the building blocks for your research and critical thinking skills that will be the foundation of your studies and future careers.

It is also a chance for you to find out about the research specialisms of the staff and become part of the Northumbria performance research community. Sessions will be led by members of the staff team to allow you an opportunity to engage directly with leading theatre and performance researchers.

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TP4002 -

Theatre and Performance Encounters (Core,40 Credits)

This module has two interrelated strands: making encounters and critiquing encounters. Central to this is hands on experience collaborating with your peers in the creation of theatre and performance practice. Alongside your own creative processes, you will be introduced to the breadth of performance works taking place in the contemporary moment, both locally and globally. These dual strands ask; how do we make theatre now? Where do we encounter performance? How do we collaborate in the creation of artistic work? This will include attending performances at local arts venues in the North East, such as Live Theatre and Northern Stage, as well as watching recorded performances. The combination of making your own theatrical encounters, while encountering the work of professionals is what makes this module a fundamental and formative aspect of your introduction to Newcastle and the region. In that regard, you will be introduced to ‘practical thinking’ that challenges divisions between practice and theory through workshops based on key theatre and performance practitioners. This (indicatively) is inclusive of approaches to dramatic and postdramatic theatre, laboratory theatres, and design-led performance. The module concludes with the presentation of scratch performances that investigate your approach to making performance encounters and the submission of a critically informed reflection and critiques of your encounters with professional performance work.

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TP4003 -

Performance Explorations (Core,40 Credits)

Through an exploration of current performance making strategies and approaches you will begin to develop an understanding of yourself as an individual artist within the theatrical ensemble, learning techniques, skills and processes of the performer-creator. You will experience and develop an understanding of the potential for the physical body onstage and a growing awareness and expanding knowledge of the artistic possibilities of both text and movement. You will gain a greater knowledge of your own body and develop processes to support both physical expressiveness and safe physical practice.

This module will also offer an introduction to the working processes of staging performance practice. You will be introduced to these processes through staff-led practical workshops on the different methods and techniques of staging. This is inclusive of approaches to directing, dramaturgy, scenography, and choreography, along with the techniques associated with stage management, digital tech, leading rehearsals, and design processes. The overall aim is to familiarise you with different production roles and prepare you for taking a lead in staging your own performances while at Northumbria and beyond.

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TP4004 -

Urgent ideas in Theatre and Performance (Core,20 Credits)

Following on from Big ideas in Theatre and Performance, this module asks you to consider the ‘urgent ideas’ that will inform the possible futures of theatre and performance. This module will challenge you to consider how factors such as climate crisis and decolonial thinking will shape performance making processes and perspectives. It will introduce you to examples of theatre and performance practice that seek to engage with urgent ideas, such as how practitioners approach notions of social justice, anti-racism, digital thinking, climate justice, decolonising, along with trans* and non-binary perspectives. The overall aim is to ensure that you are ready to ask challenging questions of yourself and your peers and offer an initial step towards becoming future leaders in the cultural sector.

As with the sister module in the first semester, sessions will be led by members of the staff team to allow you an opportunity to engage directly with leading theatre and performance researchers and induct you in the Northumbria performance research community.

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YA5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Arts (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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TP5001 -

Arguments for Theatre and Performance (Core,20 Credits)

This theory led module is focused on the social, critical, and ethical ‘challenges’ that theatre and performance makers face in the 21st century. Through a series of lectures and seminars, you will be provided with examples of critical arguments that allow you to consider theatre and performance from plural and sometimes competing perspectives. The overall aim is to give you a grounding in developing your own independent arguments on difficult, challenging, or ethically complex subjects such as city resilience, population growth, the fourth industrial revolution, class and equality, and climate justice through the frameworks such as cultural materialism, doughnut economics, Global North philosophies (universalism, liberalism, poststructuralism), Global South philosophies (pluriversal thinking, co-presence, rasa theory), and queer radicalism.

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TP5002 -

Contemporary Theatre Making (Core,20 Credits)

This practically led module will explore the processes and practices of contemporary theatre making from a number of different perspectives, drawing on a range of international practitioners. The module will help you to locate your work in relation to the history of key theatre practitioners from the late-20th and early-21st centuries. You will engage with practices such as verbatim theatre, immersive or physical performance, along with the work of (e.g.) Forced Entertainment, Augusto Boal, or Jatinder Verma. In doing so, the module asks you to think about what ‘theatre’ is (form and context) in practice. That is, through practical exploration (in studios, in urban contexts, in homes or in online environments) the module explores how we create theatre and the importance of understanding theatre-making as an active practice and ongoing cultural, political and critical process in the world.

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TP5003 -

Performance, Politics and Power in Contemporary Society (Optional,20 Credits)

This module explores some of the most critical questions of our time, asking why particular theatre productions, plays, and performance traditions are important now and how they might be engaged in understanding, critiquing and remaking the world around us. Building on the foundational work completed in year one, this research driven module will help you to develop and hone your performance analysis and research skills. Through tutor facilitated discussions, debates and in-class research activities, you will draw on research materials from key academic and political debates; this may include critical race theory, post-colonial studies, queer theory, disability studies, performance theory, feminism and gender studies, etc. By studying a wide range of theatrical texts and performances, you will have the opportunity to understand the interrelations between innovations in theatre and performance practices and the wider social and political contexts from which they emerge. That is, this module asks you: why should we make theatre and performance now?

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TP5004 -

Applied Theatre Practice (Optional,20 Credits)

As a staff research led module, you will work in close collaboration with a client organisation to explore the role of the applied theatre practitioner. Concentrating on the needs of the chosen organisation and the aligned expertise of staff, you will learn skills and understandings appropriate to their audience and/or participant group. You will further develop your ability to plan, research, make and evaluate your performance work. This will involve interrogating a variety of performance styles and devising methodologies. This practice will be undertaken in dialogue with your tutors and with representatives of the client organisation, who will help you explore your relationship with the audience and the art form. You will be encouraged to investigate the relationship between the performer and the participant, the staged and the non-staged, and how theatre making functions in spaces other than conventional theatres. The module will familiarise you with the work of some key practitioners and movements within the applied field, enabling you to appreciate how your individual experience relates to the wider cultural arena.

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TP5005 -

Investigating Theatre and Performance (Core,20 Credits)

Building on Arguments for Theatre and Performance, in this module you will develop skills in research methods that will be vital for your independent research in the final year. While still focused on the ‘grand challenges’ of the 21st century, you will be introduced to research methodologies and methods which might include areas such as practice research, documentary theatre, archival research, dialogical performance, performance analysis, interviews, ethnographic approaches, and walking performance. This module is designed as Dissertation preparation and, in that regard, it addresses issues relating to diverse approaches to the production of knowledge, but also provides students with practical and critical skills associated with particular methods of doing performance research.

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TP5006 -

Performance and the City (Core,20 Credits)

This practically led module grounds your performance making within the creative, political, and cultural challenges of ‘the city’. Based on a tutor designed brief, you will be encouraged to test and challenge the limits of theatre and performance by investigating the role performances play in representing, reflecting upon and interrogating city cultures. The brief may include site-specific work in the NewcastleGateshead area, working with a play that explores city life, a box of objects that relate to urban contexts, or another creative stimulus for approaching a devising process. This creative process will be complemented with staff-led workshops on practices such as contemporary dance, directing challenging topics, creating scenographic atmospheres, site-responsive performance, performer-audience relations, or psychophysical acting. Building on your experiences at first year and in TP5002 Contemporary Theatre Making, you will continue to develop your practical devising skills as part of small group performances. You will have the opportunity to be creative, to experiment, and to put theory into practice to make performances located in venues such as theatre studios, museums, art galleries or with found places.

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TP5007 -

Performance and Digital Cultures (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn how digital cultures are investigated through theatre and performance practices. The notion of ‘digital culture’ is explored in an expansive way to consider how ‘digital perspectives’ are represented in live performance works, along with providing tools for representation (projection, networks, etc.). This is inclusive of approaches to mixed reality, gaming theatre, and online performances along with plays that take ‘the internet’ as their subject (such as Tim Price’s Teh Internet is Serious Business and Jennifer Haley’s The Nether). As a research informed module, the interests and specialisms of the staff will guide the workshops included each year. The overall aim is to prepare you to identify, critique, and stage timely performances that investigate the social, aesthetic and political impacts of digital cultures (whether local or global) beyond a focus on the technology alone.

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TP5008 -

Performer Training: Practitioner Perspectives (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will be introduced to how select practitioners have approached the training of actors and performers. Informed by staff research interests, this module will develop your practical and theoretical understanding of how contemporary performers prepare for performance. This is inclusive of the techniques associated with (for example) Sandford Meisner, Jerzy Grotowski, Yoshi Oida, Freddie Hendricks, and Patsy Rodenburg. These techniques will be studied in workshop sessions and applied to scripted scenes. The module acts as an introduction to these performer training perspectives and offers the opportunity to expand your performance skillset, while also exploring your personal creative interests and identity. You will learn how to apply these techniques autonomously, making informed and interest driven choices on the types of material you will perform and which techniques you will use in your creative process.

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AD5001 -

Arts Work Placement Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks). You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Specific learning will depend on the nature of the employer and the placement secured. In general terms, this module is an opportunity to gain significant experience of industry practice, and to learn professional, role-specific skills ‘on the job’. It’s also a great opportunity to improve transferable skills such as communication, interpersonal skills, personal organisation, time management, presentation, commercial awareness, entrepreneurial skills, branding, and professional conduct generally; and to enhance your CV and personal portfolio. Students who have carried out placements in previous years often describe it as a transformative experience; they report greatly increased personal confidence both in terms of launching their future careers, and in returning to their final year of study. Your employer will agree in advance what your learning is likely to include, and will help you reflect on this learning at the end of your placement.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

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AD5002 -

Arts Study Abroad Year (Optional,120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

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AT5004 -

Year in International Business (This is made up of 5 modules studied in Newcastle (Semester 1) & Amsterdam (Semester 2) (Optional,120 Credits)

This overarching module descriptor covers the Year in International Business which is made up of 5 modules which students study in Newcastle (semester 1) and Amsterdam (semester 2).

This additional year of studies has been designed to develop students’ business awareness and their soft skills through a semester of study in the UK followed by engagement in studying in Amsterdam and working on real business projects to further enhance and develop this knowledge, skills and attributes.

Semester 1 in the UK comprises three 20-credit modules aimed at students new to business and management, which also equips the students for a semester in Amsterdam, working in teams on a “real-world”, client facing project. Of the modules studies in Semester 1 provide students with the “soft”, “analytical” and “project management” skills necessary to embark on a “real-world” client-centred consultancy project in Semester 2. In Semester 2, students will work move to Amsterdam and study two modules on Northumbria licensed premises. The first module, Group Business Consultancy Project, is a Level 5 40 credit Consultancy Project providing a supported and challenging experience with real business supervised by Northumbria and possibly Dutch academics. The final module complements the development of business knowledge and application through a contextualised consideration of International Business. This will also add to the Business Consultancy experience, thereby guaranteeing a coherent business experience.

The modules are outlined below:

Semester 1
HR9505 Managing People at Work (20 credits)
SM9511 Global Business Environment (20 credits)
AF5022 Financial Decision Making (20 credits)

Semester 2
AT5000 Digital Business (20)
AT5001 Group Business Consultancy Project (40 credits)

In semester 1, students will learn in an environment aligned to that of business students on full time programmes. A mixture of large group and small group sessions will take place. In semester 2, in accordance with the experiential learning pedagogical approach in the Business Clinic operated at Newcastle Business School, the group consultancy work will involve students working in groups, facilitated by academics but also independently and amongst their peers in collaborative project work to provide real business consultancy. Assessment has been developed in accordance with Northumbria’s Assessment for Learning principles including a broad mix of assessment appropriate to the learning outcomes being assessed and with opportunities for formative feedback.

A student who passes all modules will, on successful completion of their undergraduate programme of study, have the title “(Year in International Business UK and Amsterdam)” added to their degree award title. Students who do not pass 120 credits will have those modules that have been completed recorded on their transcript.

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TP6001 -

Performance Dissertation (Core,40 Credits)

This module enables you to conduct significant independent study, supported by a supervisor and resulting in either written or part written/part practical outcomes. Your choice of Dissertation topic may arise from a specific theatre and performance interest developed through theoretical and/or practical experience on the degree in previous years, and/or from extracurricular or professional contexts. The module is flexible to your interests, passions and future directions; as such, tutors will work with you to help you develop topics that are exciting, innovative and engaging.

Your topic should have appropriate content and parameters and should be designed to demonstrate your research, analytical, and evaluative skills as appropriate to your project design. The overall purpose of this module is to ensure that you have an opportunity to realize an independent research project that speaks to your particular interests and that will embed skills and expertise relevant to further study at MA and PhD level and to the world of work.

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TP6002 -

Performance Project (Optional,40 Credits)

In this optional module, you will form theatre and performance companies, each with a clear identity and purpose. You will develop appropriate working practices that are grounded in relevant processes from the programme, indicatively: making, thinking, questioning, collaborating and sharing. You will create specific events that are focused towards life and work beyond university, or in further study. In so doing, you will engage a select set of specific practices appropriate to that project, but which are likely to involve mapping existing practice, identifying starting points for a company and project, devising and developing appropriate making practices, working as peer mentors and with peer-mentors, reflecting and rethinking, refining and rehearsing, selecting and focusing, performing and presenting. Companies may work in a range of areas, in discussion with staff and subject to resources. These may, indicatively, include: Performance, Events, and Workshops (e.g. offering training for companies, organisations, community groups, etc.).

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TP6003 -

Performer Training: Future Practices (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research driven exploration on performer training; building on the foundations set by practitioners from the late 20th and early 21st centuries you will investigate new modes of performer training and think through the ways that training processes and practices may need innovating for the contemporary world. Working with staff on their specialist areas of research and practice, the precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised collaboratively with your tutor(s) to develop from their expertise. You will situate their own practical methods of preparing for performance in the context of the 21st century before moving on to begin developing your own performer training ‘vocabularies’. The overall aim of this module is to challenge you to consider alternative methods of performer training and prepare you for advising, developing and honing performance techniques that reflect the ethics of contemporary and future cultural sectors.

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TP6004 -

Popular Performance (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research driven exploration on popular performance. The precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised in line with staff expertise and interests. ‘Popular performance’ is defined in broad terms and is inclusive of stand up, cabaret, clowning, musical comedy, panto, etc. The module is designed to enable you to explore and develop solo (or duo) modes of popular performance. Situating your work within relevant social and political contexts, the overarching goal is to create a proposal for material that you could perform in front of a live audience in a relevant popular performance setting. This proposal will likely be shared as a short performance, but can also be submitted in a range of media (video, etc.) as agreed by the module leader. You will be able to utilise this material not just during the assessment but also indicate where else you might adapt and transport it.

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TP6005 -

Performance and the Politics of Fear (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research-led exploration of the place of performance (social and aesthetic) in relation to contemporary and plural contexts of the ‘politics of fear’. The precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised in line with staff expertise and interests. It considers how contemporary (western) social discourse (particularly as represented in the news media) is preoccupied with narratives of fear or anxiety: of the other, of terrorism, of the collapse of capitalism, of pandemics, of anti-social behaviour and violence, of the dumbing down of education standards, of the disintegration of community, of the rise of consumerism and ‘unthinking’ neoliberalism, for example. Meanwhile, the history of performance since Plato holds at its centre a complex and powerful anxiety about and mistrust of representation. Through recourse to critical theory, political and medical histories, psychoanalysis and philosophy you will investigate the philosophical, political and socio-cultural nature and social function of performance and representation as it relates to contemporary questions of fear, anxiety and ‘dis-ease’.

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TP6006 -

Digital Futures (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research driven exploration of future artistic, social and political opportunities and uncertainties presented by the ‘digital century’. The precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised in line with staff expertise and interests. You will consider in what ways theatre and performance cultures will shift in the next 50 years and propose creative ideas in preparation for a leading role in the cultural sector. You might look at the importance of live encounters in digital futures, or at processes of performance for digital recordings, or the ethics of digital representations that last ‘forever’ such as ‘digital death’ and digital footprints. Theoretical and cultural influences may include the impact of fourth wave feminism, posthumanism, online activism, artificial intelligence, and other responses or rejections of digitally-orientated frameworks. In response to a provocation provided by staff, the overall focus will be on speculating future contexts, opportunities and interdisciplinary practices that will confront practitioners in the digital century.

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TP6007 -

Advanced Applied Practice (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research rich exploration of the future of applied theatre and performance practices. In response to a provocation provided by staff, the overall focus will be preparing you to pitch how theatre and performance can be applied in the interests of social transformation with widely different intentions. The precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised in line with staff expertise and interests. The goal is to be critically reflective on the role of applied theatre and performance and consider the ethical challenges and nuances implicit in many of these culturally diverse contexts. This can include the role of applied theatre techniques for educational outcomes, reduction of behaviours deemed challenging, or improvements in health, along with a focus on ‘affects’ such as intangible feelings and impulses.

More information

TP6008 -

Performance and Creative Economies (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will engage in a research-led exploration of theatre and performance commissioning, funding cultures and venue programming policies. The precise focus and thematic direction of this exploration will be devised in line with staff expertise and interests. The overall aim is to offer you an insight into the role of producers, programmers, and funders in preparation for developing competitive funding applications post-graduation. As a further focus on graduate destinations, as part of the module you will complete a live funding application (e.g. Arts Council England or Creative Scotland) that, with the support of staff feedback, can be submitted to open competitions and potentially gain funding for your graduate practice.

More information

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

Theatre and Performance BA (Hons)

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

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