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Would you like to participate in a dynamic and flexible course that can be tailored to meet your own individual interests and career aspirations?

The MA History course consists of broad, thematic taught modules that focus on the middle ages through to present day.

Offering a flexible approach to study, this course incorporates five core modules which mix conventional historical study with training in research methods and the close consideration of the big interpretative questions animating the study of history today. A particular strength of the programme is the way in which it familiarises students with digital history projects and contemporary debates.

In addition to the taught modules you will also complete a dissertation under the supervision of one of our specialist historians.

Throughout your studies you will have access to our leading learning facilities and you will be welcome at academic events and seminars hosted by the new Institute of the Humanities. This includes the fortnightly History Research Seminar, where we welcome historians from throughout the world to introduce us to their latest research.

Course Information

Level of Study
Postgraduate

Mode of Study
2 years part-time distance learning
2 other options available

Department
Humanities

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Fee Information

Module Information

Videos / History

Watch Programme Leader Dr Carlos Conde Solares tell us about this Masters in a Minute (or so...) and then hear about William's experience as a student on the course.

Book an Open Day / Experience History MA

Visit an Open Day to really get an inside view of what it's like to study History MA at Northumbria. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Entry Requirements 2021/22

Standard Entry

Normally a 2.1 or first-class honours degree in a relevant discipline or equivalent qualifications

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have one of the following English language qualifications with grades as shown below.

    • A British Council International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of 6.5 (or above) with a minimum score in each component of Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking of 5.5
    • Pearson Academic score of 62 (or above) with a minimum score in each component of Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking of 51

    The University also accepts many other English language qualifications and if you have any questions about our English Language requirements please contact the International Admissions Office and we will be glad to assi

Fees and Funding 2021/22 Entry

Full UK Fee: TBC

Full EU Fee: TBC

Full International Fee: TBC



Scholarships and Discounts

Click here for UK, EU and International Scholarships scholarship, fees, and funding information.


ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

If you'd like to receive news and information from us in the future about the course or finance then please complete the below form

* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

EF0126 -

Academic Language Skills in FADSS Level 7 (Optional,0 Credits)

The purpose of this module is to develop the participant’s ability in study skills and English language skills for academic purposes.

The module is designed to develop the participants as independent learners. The module is supported by a teaching and learning plan which outlines the formal sessions, together with the tutor-directed study and independent reading. An interactive approach to seminars will draw upon the directed learning undertaken and participants’ own experience of study skills. Directed learning will centre upon a range of activities including pre-reading, preparation for interactive activities and use of the discussion board on the e-learning platform.
Independent learning will focus upon the participants identifying those skills which they need to develop and understand through a range of learning activities that might include extended reading, and reflection. The sessions will attempt to follow the principles set out by the CEM model (Sloan and Porter, 2008)

More information

HI7001 -

Historical Contexts (Core,30 Credits)

You will learn how to identify the intellectual, social, and cultural contexts that inform advanced research in historical studies. The module trains you in the skills necessary to compile historiographical material and develop theoretical knowledge about the past, including contextual analysis, source scrutiny, and understanding the ever-changing state of the historical field. These skills have major implications for your research. Most importantly, you will explore the methods and critical theories that define the study of your particular field of history. Thus, your curiosity and inquisitiveness underpin the direction of assessment. You will need to collect, sift, and analyse the secondary sources that dominate the historical understanding of your research topic. The module provides an overview of the ways in which historical writing has changed over time, and considers how theory and conceptual thinking has influenced historians. You will also learn how the historiography has developed in relation to your own research topic.

More information

HI7007 -

The British Empire and its Imperial Rivals (Core,30 Credits)

You will consider the British imperial experience from the 1707 Act of Union with Scotland to the ‘new imperialism’ of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. You will also explore the British Empire’s relationship with the other modern European empires. The approach is largely thematic. After an introductory week that explores the ways in which twentieth and twenty-first scholars have studied and theorised empire, you will move on to consider the British Empire’s changing character through an exploration of several broad themes. In addition to examining the British Empire’s relationship with racial, religious and cultural difference; you will also consider how peoples and places were settled and subjugated, how the empire was organised politically and economically, and how the empire legitimated itself. Each theme connects to a common set of questions: What motors drove imperial expansion? How was the empire organised politically, and how did the British Empire deal with ethnic minorities, religious diversity and cultural difference? How peoples and places were subjugated? Was every conquered group deemed capable of assimilation? The second half of the module compares the British imperial experience with those of France, the Ottomans and America. You will consider how these different empires interacted, whether the British imperial experience was distinct, and whether these other empires dealt with religion, race and cultural difference in the same way as the British.

More information

EF0126 -

Academic Language Skills in FADSS Level 7 (Optional,0 Credits)

The purpose of this module is to develop the participant’s ability in study skills and English language skills for academic purposes.

The module is designed to develop the participants as independent learners. The module is supported by a teaching and learning plan which outlines the formal sessions, together with the tutor-directed study and independent reading. An interactive approach to seminars will draw upon the directed learning undertaken and participants’ own experience of study skills. Directed learning will centre upon a range of activities including pre-reading, preparation for interactive activities and use of the discussion board on the e-learning platform.
Independent learning will focus upon the participants identifying those skills which they need to develop and understand through a range of learning activities that might include extended reading, and reflection. The sessions will attempt to follow the principles set out by the CEM model (Sloan and Porter, 2008)

More information

HI7004 -

War and Peace in Historical Perspective (Core,30 Credits)

What were the social, cultural and political consequences of war? How have people analysed violence of varying kinds to include war, atrocity and genocide, and how have they tried to prevent or end such acts? The module invites you to explore these questions from a variety of angles, drawing on approaches from political history, cultural history and the history of ideas. We will address debates on, and experiences of, conflict, peace-making and justice in different historical contexts – from the early modern period to the contemporary world.

The module is divided into three parts: ‘Theories and Thinkers’, ‘Conflicts in Context’ and ‘Peace, Justice and Prevention’. In the first section, we will analyse influential theories of war, conflict and genocide. The second section investigates different types of conflict, from civil war to total war to genocide in detail. The final section allows you to explore different attempts to create a more peaceful world including ending wars/violence, legal frameworks and restorative justice as well as early warning/prevention of genocide.

More information

HI7005 -

History in the Digital Age: Institutions, Issues and Ideas (Core,30 Credits)

In this module, you will learn about the advantages and potential pitfalls of doing History in the digital age. In doing so, you will develop skills that are essential for postgraduate research. The module develops your understanding of the relationship between planning research (formulating research questions, considering methodology), doing research (using a range of digital and traditional investigative techniques) and reflecting upon research (data handling and organization, the politics and ethics of research and reflective practice for writing). The module is designed to prepare you to collect, interpret and disseminate research as a means of supporting all of the modules that you take at Masters level. Crucially, the module equips you with the conceptual tools needed to approach your extended research project, the dissertation.

Throughout the module, you will consider the advantages and disadvantages of studying History in the 21st century. You will consider the historical, cultural and political role of archives, libraries and museums, but also the way in which digitized sources, digital research tool and the internet are shaping the nature of research. You will reflect on how digital methods differ from more traditional forms of historical enquiry, and how you, as a historian, can best use new technologies to develop your work.

More information

HI7010 -

History Dissertation (Core,60 Credits)

In this module you will be provided with the skills to complete a dissertation on a topic that you will negotiate with your supervisor. The History dissertation represents the culmination of your postgraduate studies. It will enable you to apply the skills you have acquired in core modules and options to a discrete body of primary sources related to an identifiable area of historical enquiry. It is an exercise in research and is intended to develop your research skills and your ability to work independently. Dissertation topics will be supervised by an expert in the field who will guide you through the various stages of formulating, researching and writing this substantial piece of work

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

EF0126 -

Academic Language Skills in FADSS Level 7 (Optional,0 Credits)

The purpose of this module is to develop the participant’s ability in study skills and English language skills for academic purposes.

The module is designed to develop the participants as independent learners. The module is supported by a teaching and learning plan which outlines the formal sessions, together with the tutor-directed study and independent reading. An interactive approach to seminars will draw upon the directed learning undertaken and participants’ own experience of study skills. Directed learning will centre upon a range of activities including pre-reading, preparation for interactive activities and use of the discussion board on the e-learning platform.
Independent learning will focus upon the participants identifying those skills which they need to develop and understand through a range of learning activities that might include extended reading, and reflection. The sessions will attempt to follow the principles set out by the CEM model (Sloan and Porter, 2008)

More information

HI7001 -

Historical Contexts (Core,30 Credits)

You will learn how to identify the intellectual, social, and cultural contexts that inform advanced research in historical studies. The module trains you in the skills necessary to compile historiographical material and develop theoretical knowledge about the past, including contextual analysis, source scrutiny, and understanding the ever-changing state of the historical field. These skills have major implications for your research. Most importantly, you will explore the methods and critical theories that define the study of your particular field of history. Thus, your curiosity and inquisitiveness underpin the direction of assessment. You will need to collect, sift, and analyse the secondary sources that dominate the historical understanding of your research topic. The module provides an overview of the ways in which historical writing has changed over time, and considers how theory and conceptual thinking has influenced historians. You will also learn how the historiography has developed in relation to your own research topic.

More information

HI7007 -

The British Empire and its Imperial Rivals (Core,30 Credits)

You will consider the British imperial experience from the 1707 Act of Union with Scotland to the ‘new imperialism’ of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. You will also explore the British Empire’s relationship with the other modern European empires. The approach is largely thematic. After an introductory week that explores the ways in which twentieth and twenty-first scholars have studied and theorised empire, you will move on to consider the British Empire’s changing character through an exploration of several broad themes. In addition to examining the British Empire’s relationship with racial, religious and cultural difference; you will also consider how peoples and places were settled and subjugated, how the empire was organised politically and economically, and how the empire legitimated itself. Each theme connects to a common set of questions: What motors drove imperial expansion? How was the empire organised politically, and how did the British Empire deal with ethnic minorities, religious diversity and cultural difference? How peoples and places were subjugated? Was every conquered group deemed capable of assimilation? The second half of the module compares the British imperial experience with those of France, the Ottomans and America. You will consider how these different empires interacted, whether the British imperial experience was distinct, and whether these other empires dealt with religion, race and cultural difference in the same way as the British.

More information

EF0126 -

Academic Language Skills in FADSS Level 7 (Optional,0 Credits)

The purpose of this module is to develop the participant’s ability in study skills and English language skills for academic purposes.

The module is designed to develop the participants as independent learners. The module is supported by a teaching and learning plan which outlines the formal sessions, together with the tutor-directed study and independent reading. An interactive approach to seminars will draw upon the directed learning undertaken and participants’ own experience of study skills. Directed learning will centre upon a range of activities including pre-reading, preparation for interactive activities and use of the discussion board on the e-learning platform.
Independent learning will focus upon the participants identifying those skills which they need to develop and understand through a range of learning activities that might include extended reading, and reflection. The sessions will attempt to follow the principles set out by the CEM model (Sloan and Porter, 2008)

More information

HI7004 -

War and Peace in Historical Perspective (Core,30 Credits)

What were the social, cultural and political consequences of war? How have people analysed violence of varying kinds to include war, atrocity and genocide, and how have they tried to prevent or end such acts? The module invites you to explore these questions from a variety of angles, drawing on approaches from political history, cultural history and the history of ideas. We will address debates on, and experiences of, conflict, peace-making and justice in different historical contexts – from the early modern period to the contemporary world.

The module is divided into three parts: ‘Theories and Thinkers’, ‘Conflicts in Context’ and ‘Peace, Justice and Prevention’. In the first section, we will analyse influential theories of war, conflict and genocide. The second section investigates different types of conflict, from civil war to total war to genocide in detail. The final section allows you to explore different attempts to create a more peaceful world including ending wars/violence, legal frameworks and restorative justice as well as early warning/prevention of genocide.

More information

HI7005 -

History in the Digital Age: Institutions, Issues and Ideas (Core,30 Credits)

In this module, you will learn about the advantages and potential pitfalls of doing History in the digital age. In doing so, you will develop skills that are essential for postgraduate research. The module develops your understanding of the relationship between planning research (formulating research questions, considering methodology), doing research (using a range of digital and traditional investigative techniques) and reflecting upon research (data handling and organization, the politics and ethics of research and reflective practice for writing). The module is designed to prepare you to collect, interpret and disseminate research as a means of supporting all of the modules that you take at Masters level. Crucially, the module equips you with the conceptual tools needed to approach your extended research project, the dissertation.

Throughout the module, you will consider the advantages and disadvantages of studying History in the 21st century. You will consider the historical, cultural and political role of archives, libraries and museums, but also the way in which digitized sources, digital research tool and the internet are shaping the nature of research. You will reflect on how digital methods differ from more traditional forms of historical enquiry, and how you, as a historian, can best use new technologies to develop your work.

More information

HI7010 -

History Dissertation (Core,60 Credits)

In this module you will be provided with the skills to complete a dissertation on a topic that you will negotiate with your supervisor. The History dissertation represents the culmination of your postgraduate studies. It will enable you to apply the skills you have acquired in core modules and options to a discrete body of primary sources related to an identifiable area of historical enquiry. It is an exercise in research and is intended to develop your research skills and your ability to work independently. Dissertation topics will be supervised by an expert in the field who will guide you through the various stages of formulating, researching and writing this substantial piece of work

More information

Study Options

The following alternative study options are available for this course:

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

History MA

START MONTH
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Any Questions?

Our admissions team will be happy to help. They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901.

Contact Details for Applicants:

bc.applicantservices@northumbria.ac.uk

All information on this course page is accurate at the time of viewing.

Courses starting in 2021 are offered as a mix of online and face to face teaching due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to flex accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

Students will be required to attend campus as far as restrictions allow. Contact time will increase as restrictions ease, or decrease, potentially to a full online offer, should restrictions increase.

Our online activity will be delivered through Blackboard Ultra, enabling collaboration, connection and engagement with materials and people.

 

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.


Your Learning Experience find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions - northumbria.ac.uk/terms
Fees and Funding - northumbria.ac.uk/fees
Admissions Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy
Admissions Complaints Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/complaints



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