Skip navigation
download pdf image

Enter your details to receive an email with a link to a downloadable PDF of this course and to receive the latest news and information from Northumbria University

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

CLOSE

Are you interested in how the modern world works? Do you want to gain an understanding of the past in order to see how the world can be changed in the future? Are you looking to study for a degree in the humanities but need a helping hand to get there?

The Humanities Foundation degree is a stepping stone to an undergraduate degree. You will explore a range of topics taken from across the humanities subject areas such as history, literature, language and linguistics, creative writing, and American studies. You will be encouraged to embrace your curiosity and creativity, as well as learning how to study at university level. You will learn how to research, evaluate sources, construct a thorough argument, and present your findings.

The student satisfaction rate for this course is 92%' (NSS 2020)

You will graduate with the analytical, philosophical and practical skills you need to undertake undergraduate study and with a wider understanding of the role of humanities in the modern world. 

94% of students said the course has provided them with opportunities to explore ideas or concepts in depth (NSS 2020)

On successful completion of the foundation year you will qualify to join any of the following degrees:

 

Are you interested in how the modern world works? Do you want to gain an understanding of the past in order to see how the world can be changed in the future? Are you looking to study for a degree in the humanities but need a helping hand to get there?

The Humanities Foundation degree is a stepping stone to an undergraduate degree. You will explore a range of topics taken from across the humanities subject areas such as history, literature, language and linguistics, creative writing, and American studies. You will be encouraged to embrace your curiosity and creativity, as well as learning how to study at university level. You will learn how to research, evaluate sources, construct a thorough argument, and present your findings.

The student satisfaction rate for this course is 92%' (NSS 2020)

You will graduate with the analytical, philosophical and practical skills you need to undertake undergraduate study and with a wider understanding of the role of humanities in the modern world. 

94% of students said the course has provided them with opportunities to explore ideas or concepts in depth (NSS 2020)

On successful completion of the foundation year you will qualify to join any of the following degrees:

 

Course Information

UCAS Code
L8L9

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
1 year full-time followed by a further 3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Humanities

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2022

Fee Information

Module Information

Department / Humanities

Our Department of Humanities includes the subject areas of History, English Literature, English Language and Linguistics, Creative Writing and American Studies.

Humanities Video Gallery

Discover more about what you will learn on the course, more about our academics research interests, and hear from current students by watching our videos.

Book an Open Day / Experience Humanities Foundation Year

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Humanities Foundation Year. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Entry Requirements 2021/22

Standard Entry

80 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants shoud have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Entry Requirements 2022/23

Standard Entry

80 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants shoud have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2021/22 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1: £9,250

* The maximum tuition fee that we are permitted to charge for UK students is set by government. Tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, these are subject to government regulations and in line with inflation.


EU Fee in Year 1: £16,000

International Fee in Year 1: £16,000

 

Click here for UK, EU and International Scholarships scholarship, fees, and funding information.

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Fees and Funding 2022/23 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1*: £9,250

* This is the tuition fee for 2021/22 entry, and the maximum permitted to charge UK students as per Government Regulations. Government are yet to announce 2022/23 fees, if there is a change fees will be adjusted accordingly.


EU Fee in Year 1: £16,500

International Fee in Year 1: £16,500


Please keep checking back for updates on 22/23 Scholarships.

For more information on Fees and Funding, please visit the main funding pages.

 


ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

If you'd like to receive news and information from us in the future about the course or finance then please complete the below form

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

How to Apply

Please use the Apply Now button at the top of this page to submit your application.

Certain applications may need to be submitted via an external application system, such as UCAS, Lawcabs or DfE Apply.

The Apply Now button will redirect you to the relevant website if this is the case.

You can find further application advice, such as what to include in your application and what happens after you apply, on our Admissions Hub Admissions | Northumbria University



Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

AD3007 -

Explorations in War and Conflict 1 (Core,20 Credits)

On this module, you will learn about several examples of war and conflict, including the English and Irish Civil Wars, the two world wars and the Shoah. You will explore the multi-faceted way historians, writers, critics and artists have engaged with conflict, and work with a diverse range of sources and media on the subject of war and conflict to hone your analytical skills, historical and cultural understanding of war and conflict. In the process, you will practice team-working and presentation skills, as well as traditional research and essay-writing skills.

More information

AD3009 -

Exploring Identity (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will explore concepts and theories of identity. You will engage with ideas of class, sexual difference, gender, racial and ethnic identity across the Humanities. You will then apply these theoretical understandings of personal and collective identities, analysing and interpreting identity represented and embodied in textual, linguistic, visual, filmic, and televisual sources. You will explore the ways in which notions of identity have evolved historically, and the ways in which particular identity groups have suffered exclusion and oppression.

More information

AD3014 -

Humanities Portfolio: Skills for University (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will complete a released test and develop a 1500-word essay demonstrating and evidencing the broad range of academic, professional and transferable employability skills you have developed throughout the Foundation year. These will include demonstrations of cogent academic prose, accurate academic citation, research skills, independent learning, oral presentation, and team work. You will develop the skills required to complete these assignments throughout semester one, drawing on the content of the module’s lectures, workshops and seminars.

More information

AD3022 -

Explorations in War and Conflict II (Core,20 Credits)

On this module, you will continue to learn more about twentieth-century conflicts, including the Shoah, the Vietnam War and civil conflict in Northern Ireland. You will learn to analyse and discuss a wide range of literary and historical sources in relation to these conflicts, and will learn how to work with such sources in order to design and create a unique digital project on a theme related to war and conflict. As part of this process, you will also engage with critical literature on the use of digital technology in the Humanities.

More information

AD3033 -

The Force of Suspicion: Scandals, Rumours and 'Fake News' in History (Optional,20 Credits)

Political and social life is often shaken by claims about scandalous circumstances and events. In some cases, such revelations are the result of thorough investigations by activists and journalists, who help uncover serious misdeeds. In other instances, however, social media and ‘fake news’ amplify conspiracy theories and lies, casting suspicion on innocent people. The module approaches these different phenomena from a historical perspective.

There are two major strands to this module. First, you will investigate how, at different points in history, particular individuals or groups became the victim of false allegations. Potential examples include the fate of women who faced accusations of witchcraft as well as the stereotypes and myths that were deployed against Jews. In covering such cases, you will gain a better understanding of the perfidious power of rumours and lies. The second strand deals with political scandals and their attempted cover-ups. In some cases, such scandals amounted to significant milestones in political history. For example, the Watergate affair – revolving around major abuses of power by US president Richard Nixon – was uncovered by journalists, leading to Nixon’s resignation and becoming a reference point in American politics. You will also learn about scandals that involved corruption or people’s private lives – and the way in which they were covered in the media.

As a whole, the module advances your understanding of specific places, events and time periods, while tackling issues that are of ongoing significance.

More information

AD3034 -

Trigger-happy: The Language and Literature of Offence and Discrimination (Optional,20 Credits)

This module challenges you to analyse the themes of ‘offence’, ‘discrimination’ and ‘censorship’ across the disciplines of English Language and Linguistics, Literature and Creative Writing. From Shakespearean insults to the language of hip-hop, from banned books to non-standard language, this module explores the question of what is ‘offensive’ language and literature, and asks what responses, if any, offensive language and literature provoke in society?

Using theories drawn from language and linguistic study, and from critical and cultural theory, and through reference to a range of cultural forms – including drama, novels, poetry, pop music and ‘everyday discourse’ – this module interrogates the concept of offence from a variety of perspectives. What is offence? Why are certain terms, aspects of language-in-use, and texts deemed offensive? How do ideas about what is offensive change over time and in different contexts?

In asking these questions, this module will provide you with an exciting opportunity to explore language, and a range of canonical and non-canonical texts, in relation to broader debates about what is deemed acceptable – and unacceptable – in language and literature at particular historical moments.

More information

AD3035 -

Exploring the Culture and History of the North East (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will explore the history and culture of Newcastle and the North East. As you explore you will learn to find scholarly resources that help you interpret the region’s past and culture. At the same time you will learn how to evaluate primary and secondary sources whether they are buildings, books, or blogs. Finally, you will learn how to create an archive of research so that you can develop your own meaningful accounts of the lives and events that have shaped the region. The module will introduce you to some key people, places and periods in the history and culture of Newcastle and the North East, and you will also have the opportunity to investigate the region guided by your own specific interests.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

AD3007 -

Explorations in War and Conflict 1 (Core,20 Credits)

On this module, you will learn about several examples of war and conflict, including the English and Irish Civil Wars, the two world wars and the Shoah. You will explore the multi-faceted way historians, writers, critics and artists have engaged with conflict, and work with a diverse range of sources and media on the subject of war and conflict to hone your analytical skills, historical and cultural understanding of war and conflict. In the process, you will practice team-working and presentation skills, as well as traditional research and essay-writing skills.

More information

AD3009 -

Exploring Identity (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will explore concepts and theories of identity. You will engage with ideas of class, sexual difference, gender, racial and ethnic identity across the Humanities. You will then apply these theoretical understandings of personal and collective identities, analysing and interpreting identity represented and embodied in textual, linguistic, visual, filmic, and televisual sources. You will explore the ways in which notions of identity have evolved historically, and the ways in which particular identity groups have suffered exclusion and oppression.

More information

AD3014 -

Humanities Portfolio: Skills for University (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will complete a released test and develop a 1500-word essay demonstrating and evidencing the broad range of academic, professional and transferable employability skills you have developed throughout the Foundation year. These will include demonstrations of cogent academic prose, accurate academic citation, research skills, independent learning, oral presentation, and team work. You will develop the skills required to complete these assignments throughout semester one, drawing on the content of the module’s lectures, workshops and seminars.

More information

AD3022 -

Explorations in War and Conflict II (Core,20 Credits)

On this module, you will continue to learn more about twentieth-century conflicts, including the Shoah, the Vietnam War and civil conflict in Northern Ireland. You will learn to analyse and discuss a wide range of literary and historical sources in relation to these conflicts, and will learn how to work with such sources in order to design and create a unique digital project on a theme related to war and conflict. As part of this process, you will also engage with critical literature on the use of digital technology in the Humanities.

More information

AD3033 -

The Force of Suspicion: Scandals, Rumours and 'Fake News' in History (Optional,20 Credits)

Political and social life is often shaken by claims about scandalous circumstances and events. In some cases, such revelations are the result of thorough investigations by activists and journalists, who help uncover serious misdeeds. In other instances, however, social media and ‘fake news’ amplify conspiracy theories and lies, casting suspicion on innocent people. The module approaches these different phenomena from a historical perspective.

There are two major strands to this module. First, you will investigate how, at different points in history, particular individuals or groups became the victim of false allegations. Potential examples include the fate of women who faced accusations of witchcraft as well as the stereotypes and myths that were deployed against Jews. In covering such cases, you will gain a better understanding of the perfidious power of rumours and lies. The second strand deals with political scandals and their attempted cover-ups. In some cases, such scandals amounted to significant milestones in political history. For example, the Watergate affair – revolving around major abuses of power by US president Richard Nixon – was uncovered by journalists, leading to Nixon’s resignation and becoming a reference point in American politics. You will also learn about scandals that involved corruption or people’s private lives – and the way in which they were covered in the media.

As a whole, the module advances your understanding of specific places, events and time periods, while tackling issues that are of ongoing significance.

More information

AD3034 -

Trigger-happy: The Language and Literature of Offence and Discrimination (Optional,20 Credits)

This module challenges you to analyse the themes of ‘offence’, ‘discrimination’ and ‘censorship’ across the disciplines of English Language and Linguistics, Literature and Creative Writing. From Shakespearean insults to the language of hip-hop, from banned books to non-standard language, this module explores the question of what is ‘offensive’ language and literature, and asks what responses, if any, offensive language and literature provoke in society?

Using theories drawn from language and linguistic study, and from critical and cultural theory, and through reference to a range of cultural forms – including drama, novels, poetry, pop music and ‘everyday discourse’ – this module interrogates the concept of offence from a variety of perspectives. What is offence? Why are certain terms, aspects of language-in-use, and texts deemed offensive? How do ideas about what is offensive change over time and in different contexts?

In asking these questions, this module will provide you with an exciting opportunity to explore language, and a range of canonical and non-canonical texts, in relation to broader debates about what is deemed acceptable – and unacceptable – in language and literature at particular historical moments.

More information

AD3035 -

Exploring the Culture and History of the North East (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will explore the history and culture of Newcastle and the North East. As you explore you will learn to find scholarly resources that help you interpret the region’s past and culture. At the same time you will learn how to evaluate primary and secondary sources whether they are buildings, books, or blogs. Finally, you will learn how to create an archive of research so that you can develop your own meaningful accounts of the lives and events that have shaped the region. The module will introduce you to some key people, places and periods in the history and culture of Newcastle and the North East, and you will also have the opportunity to investigate the region guided by your own specific interests.

More information

UniStats

Any Questions?

Our admissions team will be happy to help. They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901.

Contact Details for Applicants:

bc.applicantservices@northumbria.ac.uk

All information on this course page is accurate at the time of viewing.

Courses starting in 2021 are offered as a mix of face to face and online learning. We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to flex accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with additional restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors, potentially to a full online offer, should further restrictions be deemed necessary in future.

Our online activity will be delivered through Blackboard Ultra, enabling collaboration, connection and engagement with materials and people.

 

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.


Your Learning Experience find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions - northumbria.ac.uk/terms
Fees and Funding - northumbria.ac.uk/fees
Admissions Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy
Admissions Complaints Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/complaints




You might also be interested in...

Order your prospectus

If you're a UK/EU student and would like to know more about our courses, you can order a copy of our prospectus here.

course pdf image

Get a downloadable PDF of this course and updates from Humanities

Enter your details to receive an email with a link to a downloadable PDF of this course and to receive the latest news and information from Northumbria University

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

a sign in front of a crowd
+

Northumbria Open Days

Open Days are a great way for you to get a feel of the University, the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and the course(s) you are interested in.

a person sitting at a table using a laptop
+
a bridge over a body of water
+

Virtual Tour

Get an insight into life at Northumbria at the click of a button! Come and explore our videos and 360 panoramas to immerse yourself in our campuses and get a feel for what it is like studying here using our interactive virtual tour.

Back to top