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This Police Constable Degree Apprenticeship (PCDA) is an academic and professional programme jointly delivered by officers from Durham Constabulary and academic staff from across Northumbria University.  This programme is for officers of Durham Constabulary only.  

The programme has been designed and developed to meet the requirements of the College of Policing (CoP), the professional body for all those working in the Police Service, for the professional education of new entrants into policing via a newly-established police constable apprenticeship entry route. 

The core curriculum has been designed by the CoP to be professionally transformative and to reflect the contemporary areas of knowledge, skills, behaviours, and professional practice essential to the 21st century police constable role.  These include (but are not limited to):

  • evidence-based policing
  • decision making and discretion
  • criminology and crime prevention
  • pro-active approaches to vulnerability
  • risk and public protection
  • modern policing trends such as digital policing 

Successful completion of all three years of the programme, including completion of the integrated End Point Assessment, will result in your achievement of full competency to operate safely and lawfully as a Police Constable in the workplace (public arena) and achieving a Degree in Professional Policing Practice.

Course Information

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 Years Full Time

Department
Social Sciences

Location
Coach Lane Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
August 2021

Fee Information

Module Information

All modules throughout the three-year PCDA adhere to CoP learning outcomes and content. Student Officers will receive an in-depth weekly timetable once enrolled on the programme. 

During the programme, student officers will undertake a number of supported and specialist deployments in order to achieve Independent Patrol Status and Full Operational Competence. On the programme, they will address critical questions that span a range of areas, to explore problems from multiple perspectives relating to the role, function, and delivery of 21st century policing, including expertise in:

  • Criminology;
  • Law;
  • Applied Science;
  • Computer and Information Services (CIS);
  • Business.

At the end of the programme, student officers will undertake an individual project based around evidence-based policing and the specialist area they have undertaken in year three.  Students will also develop transferable key skills throughout the apprenticeship, including:

  • enhanced research skills enabling students to progress, if desired, to postgraduate study, or a research orientated career;
  • communicating ideas in written and oral forms;
  • the use of appropriate IT tools;
  • personal time management;
  • project management;
  • problem solving abilities;
  • independent learning skills enabling students to take responsibility for their own continued and sustainable professional development.

 

 

Northumbria University has developed considerable expertise working with police forces regionally, nationally, and internationally.  This sustained excellence in police research, is a unique strength and advantage as our work supports the design, development and delivery of this programme.

Our work is characterised as informing policy and practice, providing wide-ranging, cutting-edge science and applied research, which is developed in partnership with the Police and agencies regionally, nationally, within European networks and internationally.

During the three-year apprenticeship, student officers will have a minimum of 20% of contracted hours of off the job training over the course of the programme for university study. They will be taught and supported by a diverse range of highly experienced Durham Constabulary and Northumbria University personnel. This includes law trainers and tutors who will provide practitioner specific curriculum input in relation to law and procedures; operational tutors who will provide support, guidance and encouragement during periods of work-based learning. 

The programme will be taught on multiple sites across the three years to offer student officers the best facilities for their on the job and off the job learning.

At Coach Lane Campus officers have access to an unprecedented range of facilities including:

Additionally students will have access to unrivalled facilities at City Campus including:

  • Specially designed courtroom equipped with DVD recording;
  • The brand new dedicated Computer Network Technology and Digital Security labs;
  • Open access computing areas;
  • The comprehensive media centre with television and radio studios;
  • City Campus University Library which is open 24/7 during term time.

Immersive Interactive™ suite

This is a flexible learning space where images and videos are projected onto three walls to enhance realism and give a fully immersive, multi-sensory and interactive learning environment. The space incorporates a control room and observational area and as a fully interactive teaching facility is one of the biggest and best in the country. Providing realistic safe learning environments for you to practice your skills, it will play a pivotal role in educating and training officers, through simulated learning, an invaluable experience of “real life” policing situations, for example public order, custody suites, road traffic collisions.

Forensic Suite

An entire property converted into a crime scene house to enable you to examine simulated crime scenes.  You will also be able to access Return to Scene software that provides a 360-degree interactive scan of a crime scene allowing you to perform analysis in detail.  The rooms in the crime scene house are also fitted with recording software which can be played live to another room or recorded later for analysis.

Purpose-built interview rooms

A number of purpose-built interview rooms which are installed with recording equipment suitable for simulating interview skills which can be recorded and reviewed, as well as live streamed to another venue.  The interview rooms are set up in both a traditional manner and also for cases where more vulnerable witnesses/victim may need a less formal environment.

 

 

This is a three-year Degree Apprenticeship during the course of which you will be employed by Durham Constabulary and contracted to work 40 hours per week, with provision for off the job learning which will constitute a minimum of 20% of contracted hours over the course of the programme.

Student Officers will be deployed on a supported tutor phase in order to achieve Independent Patrol Status (IPS) by the end of year one. You will then continue to develop your personal Occupational Competency Portfolio (OCP) during years 2 and 3 on specialist and general attachments to prepare you for your End Point Assessment at the end of year 3. This will include a work-based project, presentation and discussion around your personal OCP.

Key members of wider police teams will provide support and assistance as you apply in practice the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to deal competently, lawfully and safely with work related duties in a range of situations relevant to the role of the police constable. Tutors, mentors, coaches and line managers will support individuals as well as having a role in the tripartite meetings with employer, University and student officer.

In addition, at Durham Constabulary’s training facility in Meadowfield, you will have access to Hydra Suite, purpose built digital bungalow and be involved in community based practical scenarios. You will also be exposed to the technology and equipment needed to carry out your role as a Police Officer, including access to Durham Constabulary’s purpose built operational policing system Red Sigma as well as other relevant software programmes. You will be trained in the use of personal radios and body worn video devices, giving you the ability to become accustomed to this vital technology. Also you will be individually issued all the relevant uniform and personal protection equipment at the start of your course.

 

 

Durham Constabulary will cover all tuition fees for the student officers, however, as they are in full-time employment, they are therefore not entitled to apply for student finance.  

 

 

Learn More about the Apprenticeship Levy

The first PCDA with Durham Constabulary starts in August 2020.

For further information on application and recruitment for this course, please visit Durham Constabulary. Please note all applications are made directly through Durham Constabulary. 

 

 

Entry Requirements 2020/21

Standard Entry

Admission onto a higher or degree apprenticeship can only take place if applicants are currently employed and their employer has a training agreement in place with Northumbria University.

 Applicants must be employed in a relevant role, with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts directly to their personal and professional work experience.

Potential apprentices will need:

120 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-levels, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas or the International Baccalaureate.

 

We may also consider applicants who have successfully completed a related Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship, or those with non-standard qualifications, or a significant amount of relevant work-based or professional experience.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator  

English Language Requirements:

International applicants should have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

 

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

GCSE Requirements:

It is a condition that you have GCSE grades C/4 or above in English Language and Maths, or Functional Skills English or Maths at level 2 by the End Point Assessment period of your Appren

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Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

DC4001 -

Technology and Policing (20 Credits)

You will be given a more detailed introduction to the prevalence of technology and devices in modern society and their effect on policing, including the use of technology to undertake fraud and how it can be exploited by various terrorist organisations. You will be introduced to the principles of digital crimes and digital forensics from both a theoretical and technical perspective provided in contextual setting for digital forensics by an examination of the criminal justice system within England and Wales. You will be introduced to the basic philosophy and concepts of digital forensics, in particular the role of digital evidence and the basic techniques associated with gathering, preserving and presenting digital evidence. You will be guided in developing a critical and analytical approach to problem solving, the application of computer fundamentals and principles to digital evidence, an examination of the consequences of actions, the need to protect evidential integrity, and the need to document all actions. You will also be provided with an introduction to the particular legal, professional and ethical issues likely to face digital forensic examinations, such as legal requirements in the gathering, preservation and presentation of digital evidence so that it will be admissible in a court of law.

CoP PCDA Curriculum

Digital Policing: 1.1-1.4; 2.2-2.3; 4.2; 5.1-5.3; 6.3-6.6; 7.1 B, C, E, F; 7.2
Counter Terrorism: 1.1-1.5; 2.1-2.2; 3.1-3.2; 4.1-4.2; 5.1-5.4; 6.1-6.3; 7.1-7.5
Conducting Investigations: 2.14
Victims and Witnesses: 5.2

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC4002 -

Crime and Investigation (20 Credits)

This module introduces student officers to criminal investigations and police processes. The module covers the various stages of the law enforcement process, from the legislation/guidance underpinning information and intelligence to the provision of materials for disclosure by the Crown Prosecution Service. In doing so the module examines broad themes such as how information and intelligence held by other agencies can help police operations to specific ones such as things to consider when responding to an incident. It necessarily covers the fundamental principles, legislation and powers related to such activities as well as the police processes that are derived from these.

The core of the module provides a detailed examination of the processes involved in conduct investigations. Unsurprisingly, this section of the module considers the appropriate approaches and/or processes for both responding to and attending incidents as well as gathering and managing evidence/information and carrying out investigations at the crime scene and elsewhere. In doing so it examines the nature and management of evidence and its use within court process.

In addition, the module considers police ethics and how the police support the vulnerable, victims and witnesses but also the responsibilities and procedures for detaining and escorting suspects to and once within custody. It also explores processes surrounding the building of effective case files such as the securing of evidence and the management of exhibits. It also considers the data protection and the general management of management of information and intelligence


CoP PCDA Curriculum:

Week One and Two
Criminal Justice: 3.1; 4.1-4.2; 7.1-7.8; 8.1-8.2; 9.1-9.4; 11.1-11.13; 12.1-12.5; 12.6-12.9; 13.1-13.5
Conducting Investigations: 9.1-9.11


Week Two and Three
Victims and Witness: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.5; 3.1-3.5; 4.1-4.5; 5.1-5.4-5.6; 6.1-6.7; 7.1-7.3; 8.1-8.7
Vulnerability and Risk: 7.1-7.2; 9.1; 9.3-9.5
Public Protection: 5.1; 5.7
Criminal Justice: 1.1-1.5; 4.1-4.2; 5.1-5.2; 5.5; 6.1-6.3; 7.4; 8.1-8.2; 10.1-10.4; 11.10; 12.5
Conducting Investigations: 1.1-1.10; 2.9; 2.11; 2.17; 3.1-3.7; 3.10-3.12; 3.15; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.6; 6.1-6.8; 7.1-7.16; 7.18-7.20; 8.1-8.7; 9.1-9.4: 9.6-9.7
Leadership and Teamwork: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3
Decision Making and Discretion: 6.5
Communication Skills: 1.1-1.9; 1.6; 7.11
Managing Conflict: 2.1; 2.3-2.5

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC4003 -

Introduction to Policing (20 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DC4004 -

Policing Communities: Law and Procedure (20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the powers, procedures and law that you will need to police communities lawfully and ethically. The module will explore strategies for policing communities which will enable you to effective ethically and professionally detect crimes, protect the public and police the roads. This will include you gaining an understanding of relevant legislation and guidance associated with different forms of policing. The module will consider general legal themes and policies in relation to policing, while introducing students specifically to

1. Crime Recording, Intelligence, Policing communities.
2. Evidence Based Policing, Problem Solving, PACE powers.
3. Response Policing: Roads Policing and Drugs.
4. Understanding the Role of the PC (i): Disorder, Damage and Offensive Weapons.
5. Understanding the Role of the PC (ii): Substantive Criminal Offences & Investigative Powers.

CoP PCDA curriculum learning outcomes (content):

Policing Communities 1.1-1.6,2.1-2.4,3.1-3.4, 4.1-4.4, 5.1-5.8
Criminal Justice 2.1-2.2, 4.2, 5.2-5.7, 6.1-6.3
Information and Intelligence 1.1-8.5
Criminology and Crime Prevention 1.1-2.3 2.3
Digital Policing 3.1, 4.1, 7.1
Understanding the role of the PC 7.2, 7.3, 7.4
Evidenced based Policing 1.1 - 1.4 2.1,2.2, 3.1, 4.1-4.5
POP 1.1-2.5
Conducting Investigations 1.2, 1.3 - 2.2, 2.4-2.6, 2.9-2.10, 2.15, 2.17, 3.1-3.8, 2.16, 3.12, 3.13, 3.15, 9.11
Roads Policing 1.1-7.7
Response Policing 2.5, 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, 4.15, 4.16, 4.22, 5.1-5.3, 6.1- 8.15, 9.1-10.4
Decision Making and Discretion 3.1-5.3
Public Protection 1.1, 1.20
Victims and Witnesses: 7.1

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC4005 -

Protecting the Vulnerable (20 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DC4007 -

Policing in Practice (20 Credits)

This year long module begins with one week of officer personal safety training. Following this - from week 19 onwards - the module consists of an extended period of operational practice where you will be expected to apply in the workplace the knowledge and understanding gained from related modules. Your first supported patrol phase runs between weeks 19-28, with a second and third supported patrol phase running between weeks 29-45 and 46-52 respectively. During the operational phases you will demonstrate (under appropriate levels of supervision) some supported application and awareness of the competencies relating to the role of the police constable. During this period, you will be introduced to a range of operational experience and it is expected that you will achieve Independent Patrol Status (IPS) towards the end of level 4. Evidence presented in the OCP will be reviewed on a five weekly basis by the Assessor and constructed feedback given. Under the guidance and supervision of your Assessor, once you are satisfied that the evidence is sufficient you will submit it for summative assessment. It is expected that you will achieve Independent Patrol Status during the practice period. The achievement of IPS at level 4 provides a gateway to level 5. Please note, as this is a degree-based apprenticeship, before being confirmed as having achieved Independent Patrol Status the apprentice must have successfully completed all degree modules containing learning and development and professional practice linked to IPS

CoP PCDA curriculum learning outcomes (content):

Week One – Personal Safety Training (PST)

Decision Making and Discretion:1.1-2.4; 3.1-3.2; 6.1-7.3 (3.1-3.2 light touch)
Understanding the Police Constable Role: 7.1
Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 1.2-1.3; 2.1-2.3
Managing Conflict:1.1-10.5
Response Policing: 4.12-4.15

Practice Weeks

Understanding the Police Constable Role: 7.1-7.4
Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3
Maintaining Professional Standards: 2.1-2.5; 3.1-3.5
Evidence Based Policing: 4.1-4.5
Problem Solving: 2.1-2.5
Decision Making and Discretion: 6.1-6.5 (7.1-7.3)
Communication Skills: 2.1-2.4
Wellbeing and Resilience: 1.1-1.6
Managing Conflict: 10.1-10.5
Vulnerability and Risk: 9.1-9.4
Public Protection: 4.1-4.2; 5.1-5.9
Victims and Witnesses: 3.1-3.5; 4.1-4.5; 6.1-6.7; 8.1-8.7
Criminal Justice: 4.1-4.3; 5.1-5.8; (6.1-6.3); 7.1-7.8; 9.1-9.4; 10.1-10.5; 11.1-11.6
Digital Policing: 6.1-6.6; 7.1-7.2
Counter Terrorism: 6.1-6.3; 7.1-7.5
Response Policing: 4.1-4.22; 5.1-5.3; 7.1-7.3; 8.1-8.15; 9.1-9.7
Policing Communities: 4.1-4.4
Policing the Roads: 5.1-5.2; 6.1-6.6; 7.1-7.7
Information and Intelligence: 2.1-2.2; 3.1-3.18
Conducting Investigations: 2.1-2.17; 3.1-3.15; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.6; 7.1-7.20

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5001 -

Leadership and Communication (20 Credits)

This multi-faceted module considers aspects of the police organisation, decision-making and risk, communication, team work and cohesion, professional standards and accountability, information and intelligence, and builds upon ideas touched upon in year 1. It covers abstract ideas - such as risk - as well as practical issues - such as how circumstances and culture can influence decision-making process and how the police use the national decision model. It also examines key practices that influence how an organisation operates such as team work, communication, and culture. The latter constitutes a key bridge to the other aspects of the module namely, the development and nature of professional standards and contemporary external accountability mechanisms such as Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services and the Independent Office for Police Conduct.

CoP PCDA Curriculum:
Maintaining Professional Standards:1.1-1.2; 2.1; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.1; 5.1-5.2; 6.1-6.3
Decision Making and Discretion: 1.1-1.4; 2.1; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.2; 5.1-5.3
Communication Skills: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.2; 4.1-4.2
Wellbeing and Resilience: 1.1-1.2; 2.1-2.2
Leadership and Team-working: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.3
Information and Intelligence: 1.1-1.5; 2.1-2.4; 3.1-3.6; 4.1-4.5

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5002 -

Public Protection (20 Credits)

The module will help you understand how professional standards, ethics, and diversity are essential components of contemporary policing. These combined elements are significant in terms of recruiting and retaining a professional and effective workforce, which has been a key challenge (as the module demonstrates) for many years. You will learn that professional policing is also important in terms of maintaining positive relations with diverse communities, and public confidence and legitimacy more generally. Not only are these core features of policing in democratic societies they are also operationally important in relation to public cooperation with police investigations and law enforcement more widely. You will also learn about dimensions of vulnerability and risk in contemporary policing, and how professional responses are centrally important to meeting public expectations. You will learn how different dimensions of vulnerability are linked to wider social problems: these can both pose challenges to police officers and offer important opportunities for the police to intervene to help address underlying problems.

Diversity, ethics and authority are centrally important in the exercise of police officer discretion, as the module outlines. Principles and practices of policing integrity are outlined in terms of decision-making and officer discretion, and you will learn about personal and professional responsibilities in this process and the impact that police officers can have on the lives of individuals and of communities. Matters of vulnerability and risk are also addressed in relation more widely to the criminal justice system, and crime prevention, such that the most effective response, on the basis of research evidence, are identified. Risk and vulnerability are considered in wider terms of communities and societies in general and the administration of criminal justice.


CoP PCDA Curriculum:
Criminology and Crime Prevention: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.2; 4.1-4.1; 5.1-5.4
Public Protection: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.2; 4.1-4.2; 5.1-5.3; 6.1-6.2; 7.1-7.3
Vulnerability and Risk: 1.1-1.8; 2.1-2.6; 3.1-3.2; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.3; 6.1-6.4
Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 1.1; 2.1-2.5; 3.1-3.9
Criminal Justice: 1.1-1.2; 2.1-2.4

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5003 -

Digital Policing and Counter Terrorism (20 Credits)

The module examines the relationship between Internet-based digital technologies, and their criminal exploitation. You will be provided with a thorough introduction to basic principles and technologies in modern computing networks as well as the theory underpinning the communication architecture in these modern networks. You will examine the legislation and processes appropriate to the investigation of internet-related crime at a local and national level, including risk posted by counter terrorism, and the issues in respect of working with investigative partners.

This module will also allow students to also gain a more detailed and in-depth understanding of counter terrorism, the forms terrorism may take, and the appropriate response to it.

CoP PCDA Learning Outcomes:
Digital Policing; 1.1-1,2; 2.1-2.2; 3.1
Counter Terrorism: 1.1-1.8; 2.1; 3.1-3.5

To include reflection on Decision Making and Discretion: 5.1-5.3 (covered in full in leadership and communication module).

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5017 -

Research Methods for Police Constables (20 Credits)

On this module you will learn how the development of research and scientific analysis can develop Evidence Based Policing and the benefits and limitations associated with this. You will learn how to conduct systematic literature reviews and critically evaluate available evidence. Quantitative and qualitative research techniques are introduced, including survey design and implementation, research interviews, data analysis, sampling, and data processing. Practical matters relating to the conduct of research are addressed in terms of planning and selecting different methodologies for specific types of research question, the ethics of research and presentation of data.

CoP PCDA curriculum learning outcomes:
Evidence Based Policing: 1.1-3.6
Research Methods and Skills: 1.1-6.2

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5024 -

Introduction to Policing Practice in Key Areas (40 Credits)

Throughout this module, you will undertake more advanced learning across the five principal areas of professional practice to acquire higher-level operational knowledge and skills in the following five key areas:

• Response policing
• Policing communities
• Policing the roads
• Information and intelligence
• Conducting investigations.

Throughout this module you undertake a number of operational attachments in the Durham Constabulary area that provide practical experience achieved through operational deployment, in recognition of the complexity of the various operational functions covered by the four distinct policing areas listed below. The combination of classroom learning and the work attachments will provide you with the high-level skills of a multi-competent police constable.

CoP PCDA Curriculum:
Response Policing: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.6; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-5.4
Policing communities: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.7; 3.1-3.7; 4.1-4.3
Policing the Roads: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.4; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.6; 5.1-5.3
Conducting Investigations 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.3; 6.1-6.6.

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5024 -

Introduction to Policing Practice in Key Areas (Core,40 Credits)

Throughout this module, you will undertake more advanced learning across the five principal areas of professional practice to acquire higher-level operational knowledge and skills in the following five key areas:

• Response policing
• Policing communities
• Policing the roads
• Information and intelligence
• Conducting investigations.

Throughout this module you undertake a number of operational attachments in the Durham Constabulary area that provide practical experience achieved through operational deployment, in recognition of the complexity of the various operational functions covered by the four distinct policing areas listed below. The combination of classroom learning and the work attachments will provide you with the high-level skills of a multi-competent police constable.

CoP PCDA Curriculum:
Response Policing: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.6; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-5.4
Policing communities: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.7; 3.1-3.7; 4.1-4.3
Policing the Roads: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.4; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.6; 5.1-5.3
Conducting Investigations 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.3; 6.1-6.6.

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC6014 -

Advanced Professional Development (60 Credits)

This year long module is focused around the five specialist areas of policing determined by the College of Policing and reflected in the PCDA core curriculum (Response Policing; Policing Communities; Policing the Roads; Information and Intelligence; Conducting Investigations to include PIP level 2). During this module you undertake an extended period of operational practice, punctuated by additional periods of classroom based learning on related modules. While the majority of time in the workplace will be spent on general deployment, you will complete a work based attachment in an area of specialism. This module encompasses two elements of the End Point Assessment.

CoP PCDA curriculum learning outcomes (content):
• Information and Intelligence: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.6; 3.1; 4.1-4.6
• Response Policing:1.1-1.8; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.5
• Policing Communities: 1.1-1.7; 2.1-2.4; 3.1-3.2
• Policing the Roads: 1.1-1.2
• Conducting investigations: 1.1-1.17; 2.1-2.6; 3.1-3.7; 4.1; 5.1-5.7; 6.1-6.4
The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC6015 -

Evidence Based Policing Dissertation (40 Credits)

You will apply academic knowledge and research skills to practical challenges in contemporary policing. You will pursue an independent project researching a selected topic that is relevant to Durham Constabulary. Throughout this period you will identify, understand, and interpret information about the selected topic; organise that information in order to arrive at and answer a focused research question; and make appropriate use of theory and methodology. You will understand ethical considerations in relation to conducting research. In addressing the topic you will demonstrate understanding of the overall strategic context of policing and professional practice. An important part of the project will be for you to identify potential interventions or applied strategies to address challenges identified in relation to the selected topic. To communicate research outcomes effectively you will be required to provide an executive summary based on your study. The evidence based research project is an integral element forming part of the End Point Assessment.

PCDA CoP curriculum:
Understanding the Police Constable Role (Advanced): 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.3; 3.1
Evidence-Based Policing/Problem Solving/Research Skills: 1.1-1.6; 2.1-2.9; 3.1

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC9617 -

Advanced Professional Policing (20 Credits)

Students will examine key aspects of leadership and communication within the context of contemporary policing. The module builds upon the notions of ‘the profession’, and ‘professional policing’, with ideas about ‘leadership’, ‘coaching’ and ‘mentoring’ and applies them to the contemporary police organisation and those working within it. Students will also examine the ideas of ‘work-based’ and ‘standardised’ assessment and the relationship of these to professional standards within the police service. Students will consider the role of communication in contemporary policing. Communication is not only important to leadership, coaching and mentoring it is a vital aspect of contemporary policing society and so the module also examines media strategy and engagement and the police’s use of social media.


CoP PCDA curriculum learning outcomes:
Leadership and Team Working 1.1-1.6
1 Review key principles of leadership in relation to policing and employ appropriate leadership skills as a police constable
Introduction to Coaching, Mentoring and Assessment 1-1-1.6; 2.1-2.2; 3.1-3.7; 4.1-4.3
1 Explain the skills required to deliver coaching and mentoring support and how these activities can promote professional development
2 Explore how learning from coaching and mentoring sessions can be applied in the workplace
3 Examine the principles of work-based assessment within policing
4 Understand the principles and practices of standardising assessment within the police service in order to ensure that consistent, professional standards are maintained
Communication skills 1-4; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.3
1 Use social media as a means of informing and engaging with the community and promoting policing initiatives
2 Understand the principles and processes of an effective communication strategy
3 Know how to deal effectively with the media in a policing context

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

DC4001 -

Technology and Policing (20 Credits)

You will be given a more detailed introduction to the prevalence of technology and devices in modern society and their effect on policing, including the use of technology to undertake fraud and how it can be exploited by various terrorist organisations. You will be introduced to the principles of digital crimes and digital forensics from both a theoretical and technical perspective provided in contextual setting for digital forensics by an examination of the criminal justice system within England and Wales. You will be introduced to the basic philosophy and concepts of digital forensics, in particular the role of digital evidence and the basic techniques associated with gathering, preserving and presenting digital evidence. You will be guided in developing a critical and analytical approach to problem solving, the application of computer fundamentals and principles to digital evidence, an examination of the consequences of actions, the need to protect evidential integrity, and the need to document all actions. You will also be provided with an introduction to the particular legal, professional and ethical issues likely to face digital forensic examinations, such as legal requirements in the gathering, preservation and presentation of digital evidence so that it will be admissible in a court of law.

CoP PCDA Curriculum

Digital Policing: 1.1-1.4; 2.2-2.3; 4.2; 5.1-5.3; 6.3-6.6; 7.1 B, C, E, F; 7.2
Counter Terrorism: 1.1-1.5; 2.1-2.2; 3.1-3.2; 4.1-4.2; 5.1-5.4; 6.1-6.3; 7.1-7.5
Conducting Investigations: 2.14
Victims and Witnesses: 5.2

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC4002 -

Crime and Investigation (20 Credits)

This module introduces student officers to criminal investigations and police processes. The module covers the various stages of the law enforcement process, from the legislation/guidance underpinning information and intelligence to the provision of materials for disclosure by the Crown Prosecution Service. In doing so the module examines broad themes such as how information and intelligence held by other agencies can help police operations to specific ones such as things to consider when responding to an incident. It necessarily covers the fundamental principles, legislation and powers related to such activities as well as the police processes that are derived from these.

The core of the module provides a detailed examination of the processes involved in conduct investigations. Unsurprisingly, this section of the module considers the appropriate approaches and/or processes for both responding to and attending incidents as well as gathering and managing evidence/information and carrying out investigations at the crime scene and elsewhere. In doing so it examines the nature and management of evidence and its use within court process.

In addition, the module considers police ethics and how the police support the vulnerable, victims and witnesses but also the responsibilities and procedures for detaining and escorting suspects to and once within custody. It also explores processes surrounding the building of effective case files such as the securing of evidence and the management of exhibits. It also considers the data protection and the general management of management of information and intelligence


CoP PCDA Curriculum:

Week One and Two
Criminal Justice: 3.1; 4.1-4.2; 7.1-7.8; 8.1-8.2; 9.1-9.4; 11.1-11.13; 12.1-12.5; 12.6-12.9; 13.1-13.5
Conducting Investigations: 9.1-9.11


Week Two and Three
Victims and Witness: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.5; 3.1-3.5; 4.1-4.5; 5.1-5.4-5.6; 6.1-6.7; 7.1-7.3; 8.1-8.7
Vulnerability and Risk: 7.1-7.2; 9.1; 9.3-9.5
Public Protection: 5.1; 5.7
Criminal Justice: 1.1-1.5; 4.1-4.2; 5.1-5.2; 5.5; 6.1-6.3; 7.4; 8.1-8.2; 10.1-10.4; 11.10; 12.5
Conducting Investigations: 1.1-1.10; 2.9; 2.11; 2.17; 3.1-3.7; 3.10-3.12; 3.15; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.6; 6.1-6.8; 7.1-7.16; 7.18-7.20; 8.1-8.7; 9.1-9.4: 9.6-9.7
Leadership and Teamwork: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3
Decision Making and Discretion: 6.5
Communication Skills: 1.1-1.9; 1.6; 7.11
Managing Conflict: 2.1; 2.3-2.5

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC4003 -

Introduction to Policing (20 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DC4004 -

Policing Communities: Law and Procedure (20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the powers, procedures and law that you will need to police communities lawfully and ethically. The module will explore strategies for policing communities which will enable you to effective ethically and professionally detect crimes, protect the public and police the roads. This will include you gaining an understanding of relevant legislation and guidance associated with different forms of policing. The module will consider general legal themes and policies in relation to policing, while introducing students specifically to

1. Crime Recording, Intelligence, Policing communities.
2. Evidence Based Policing, Problem Solving, PACE powers.
3. Response Policing: Roads Policing and Drugs.
4. Understanding the Role of the PC (i): Disorder, Damage and Offensive Weapons.
5. Understanding the Role of the PC (ii): Substantive Criminal Offences & Investigative Powers.

CoP PCDA curriculum learning outcomes (content):

Policing Communities 1.1-1.6,2.1-2.4,3.1-3.4, 4.1-4.4, 5.1-5.8
Criminal Justice 2.1-2.2, 4.2, 5.2-5.7, 6.1-6.3
Information and Intelligence 1.1-8.5
Criminology and Crime Prevention 1.1-2.3 2.3
Digital Policing 3.1, 4.1, 7.1
Understanding the role of the PC 7.2, 7.3, 7.4
Evidenced based Policing 1.1 - 1.4 2.1,2.2, 3.1, 4.1-4.5
POP 1.1-2.5
Conducting Investigations 1.2, 1.3 - 2.2, 2.4-2.6, 2.9-2.10, 2.15, 2.17, 3.1-3.8, 2.16, 3.12, 3.13, 3.15, 9.11
Roads Policing 1.1-7.7
Response Policing 2.5, 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, 4.15, 4.16, 4.22, 5.1-5.3, 6.1- 8.15, 9.1-10.4
Decision Making and Discretion 3.1-5.3
Public Protection 1.1, 1.20
Victims and Witnesses: 7.1

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC4005 -

Protecting the Vulnerable (20 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DC4007 -

Policing in Practice (20 Credits)

This year long module begins with one week of officer personal safety training. Following this - from week 19 onwards - the module consists of an extended period of operational practice where you will be expected to apply in the workplace the knowledge and understanding gained from related modules. Your first supported patrol phase runs between weeks 19-28, with a second and third supported patrol phase running between weeks 29-45 and 46-52 respectively. During the operational phases you will demonstrate (under appropriate levels of supervision) some supported application and awareness of the competencies relating to the role of the police constable. During this period, you will be introduced to a range of operational experience and it is expected that you will achieve Independent Patrol Status (IPS) towards the end of level 4. Evidence presented in the OCP will be reviewed on a five weekly basis by the Assessor and constructed feedback given. Under the guidance and supervision of your Assessor, once you are satisfied that the evidence is sufficient you will submit it for summative assessment. It is expected that you will achieve Independent Patrol Status during the practice period. The achievement of IPS at level 4 provides a gateway to level 5. Please note, as this is a degree-based apprenticeship, before being confirmed as having achieved Independent Patrol Status the apprentice must have successfully completed all degree modules containing learning and development and professional practice linked to IPS

CoP PCDA curriculum learning outcomes (content):

Week One – Personal Safety Training (PST)

Decision Making and Discretion:1.1-2.4; 3.1-3.2; 6.1-7.3 (3.1-3.2 light touch)
Understanding the Police Constable Role: 7.1
Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 1.2-1.3; 2.1-2.3
Managing Conflict:1.1-10.5
Response Policing: 4.12-4.15

Practice Weeks

Understanding the Police Constable Role: 7.1-7.4
Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3
Maintaining Professional Standards: 2.1-2.5; 3.1-3.5
Evidence Based Policing: 4.1-4.5
Problem Solving: 2.1-2.5
Decision Making and Discretion: 6.1-6.5 (7.1-7.3)
Communication Skills: 2.1-2.4
Wellbeing and Resilience: 1.1-1.6
Managing Conflict: 10.1-10.5
Vulnerability and Risk: 9.1-9.4
Public Protection: 4.1-4.2; 5.1-5.9
Victims and Witnesses: 3.1-3.5; 4.1-4.5; 6.1-6.7; 8.1-8.7
Criminal Justice: 4.1-4.3; 5.1-5.8; (6.1-6.3); 7.1-7.8; 9.1-9.4; 10.1-10.5; 11.1-11.6
Digital Policing: 6.1-6.6; 7.1-7.2
Counter Terrorism: 6.1-6.3; 7.1-7.5
Response Policing: 4.1-4.22; 5.1-5.3; 7.1-7.3; 8.1-8.15; 9.1-9.7
Policing Communities: 4.1-4.4
Policing the Roads: 5.1-5.2; 6.1-6.6; 7.1-7.7
Information and Intelligence: 2.1-2.2; 3.1-3.18
Conducting Investigations: 2.1-2.17; 3.1-3.15; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.6; 7.1-7.20

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5001 -

Leadership and Communication (20 Credits)

This multi-faceted module considers aspects of the police organisation, decision-making and risk, communication, team work and cohesion, professional standards and accountability, information and intelligence, and builds upon ideas touched upon in year 1. It covers abstract ideas - such as risk - as well as practical issues - such as how circumstances and culture can influence decision-making process and how the police use the national decision model. It also examines key practices that influence how an organisation operates such as team work, communication, and culture. The latter constitutes a key bridge to the other aspects of the module namely, the development and nature of professional standards and contemporary external accountability mechanisms such as Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services and the Independent Office for Police Conduct.

CoP PCDA Curriculum:
Maintaining Professional Standards:1.1-1.2; 2.1; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.1; 5.1-5.2; 6.1-6.3
Decision Making and Discretion: 1.1-1.4; 2.1; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.2; 5.1-5.3
Communication Skills: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.2; 4.1-4.2
Wellbeing and Resilience: 1.1-1.2; 2.1-2.2
Leadership and Team-working: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.3
Information and Intelligence: 1.1-1.5; 2.1-2.4; 3.1-3.6; 4.1-4.5

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5002 -

Public Protection (20 Credits)

The module will help you understand how professional standards, ethics, and diversity are essential components of contemporary policing. These combined elements are significant in terms of recruiting and retaining a professional and effective workforce, which has been a key challenge (as the module demonstrates) for many years. You will learn that professional policing is also important in terms of maintaining positive relations with diverse communities, and public confidence and legitimacy more generally. Not only are these core features of policing in democratic societies they are also operationally important in relation to public cooperation with police investigations and law enforcement more widely. You will also learn about dimensions of vulnerability and risk in contemporary policing, and how professional responses are centrally important to meeting public expectations. You will learn how different dimensions of vulnerability are linked to wider social problems: these can both pose challenges to police officers and offer important opportunities for the police to intervene to help address underlying problems.

Diversity, ethics and authority are centrally important in the exercise of police officer discretion, as the module outlines. Principles and practices of policing integrity are outlined in terms of decision-making and officer discretion, and you will learn about personal and professional responsibilities in this process and the impact that police officers can have on the lives of individuals and of communities. Matters of vulnerability and risk are also addressed in relation more widely to the criminal justice system, and crime prevention, such that the most effective response, on the basis of research evidence, are identified. Risk and vulnerability are considered in wider terms of communities and societies in general and the administration of criminal justice.


CoP PCDA Curriculum:
Criminology and Crime Prevention: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.2; 4.1-4.1; 5.1-5.4
Public Protection: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.2; 4.1-4.2; 5.1-5.3; 6.1-6.2; 7.1-7.3
Vulnerability and Risk: 1.1-1.8; 2.1-2.6; 3.1-3.2; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.3; 6.1-6.4
Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 1.1; 2.1-2.5; 3.1-3.9
Criminal Justice: 1.1-1.2; 2.1-2.4

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5003 -

Digital Policing and Counter Terrorism (20 Credits)

The module examines the relationship between Internet-based digital technologies, and their criminal exploitation. You will be provided with a thorough introduction to basic principles and technologies in modern computing networks as well as the theory underpinning the communication architecture in these modern networks. You will examine the legislation and processes appropriate to the investigation of internet-related crime at a local and national level, including risk posted by counter terrorism, and the issues in respect of working with investigative partners.

This module will also allow students to also gain a more detailed and in-depth understanding of counter terrorism, the forms terrorism may take, and the appropriate response to it.

CoP PCDA Learning Outcomes:
Digital Policing; 1.1-1,2; 2.1-2.2; 3.1
Counter Terrorism: 1.1-1.8; 2.1; 3.1-3.5

To include reflection on Decision Making and Discretion: 5.1-5.3 (covered in full in leadership and communication module).

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5017 -

Research Methods for Police Constables (20 Credits)

On this module you will learn how the development of research and scientific analysis can develop Evidence Based Policing and the benefits and limitations associated with this. You will learn how to conduct systematic literature reviews and critically evaluate available evidence. Quantitative and qualitative research techniques are introduced, including survey design and implementation, research interviews, data analysis, sampling, and data processing. Practical matters relating to the conduct of research are addressed in terms of planning and selecting different methodologies for specific types of research question, the ethics of research and presentation of data.

CoP PCDA curriculum learning outcomes:
Evidence Based Policing: 1.1-3.6
Research Methods and Skills: 1.1-6.2

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5024 -

Introduction to Policing Practice in Key Areas (Core,40 Credits)

Throughout this module, you will undertake more advanced learning across the five principal areas of professional practice to acquire higher-level operational knowledge and skills in the following five key areas:

• Response policing
• Policing communities
• Policing the roads
• Information and intelligence
• Conducting investigations.

Throughout this module you undertake a number of operational attachments in the Durham Constabulary area that provide practical experience achieved through operational deployment, in recognition of the complexity of the various operational functions covered by the four distinct policing areas listed below. The combination of classroom learning and the work attachments will provide you with the high-level skills of a multi-competent police constable.

CoP PCDA Curriculum:
Response Policing: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.6; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-5.4
Policing communities: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.7; 3.1-3.7; 4.1-4.3
Policing the Roads: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.4; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.6; 5.1-5.3
Conducting Investigations 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.3; 6.1-6.6.

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC5024 -

Introduction to Policing Practice in Key Areas (40 Credits)

Throughout this module, you will undertake more advanced learning across the five principal areas of professional practice to acquire higher-level operational knowledge and skills in the following five key areas:

• Response policing
• Policing communities
• Policing the roads
• Information and intelligence
• Conducting investigations.

Throughout this module you undertake a number of operational attachments in the Durham Constabulary area that provide practical experience achieved through operational deployment, in recognition of the complexity of the various operational functions covered by the four distinct policing areas listed below. The combination of classroom learning and the work attachments will provide you with the high-level skills of a multi-competent police constable.

CoP PCDA Curriculum:
Response Policing: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.6; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-5.4
Policing communities: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.7; 3.1-3.7; 4.1-4.3
Policing the Roads: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.4; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.6; 5.1-5.3
Conducting Investigations 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.3; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.3; 6.1-6.6.

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC6014 -

Advanced Professional Development (60 Credits)

This year long module is focused around the five specialist areas of policing determined by the College of Policing and reflected in the PCDA core curriculum (Response Policing; Policing Communities; Policing the Roads; Information and Intelligence; Conducting Investigations to include PIP level 2). During this module you undertake an extended period of operational practice, punctuated by additional periods of classroom based learning on related modules. While the majority of time in the workplace will be spent on general deployment, you will complete a work based attachment in an area of specialism. This module encompasses two elements of the End Point Assessment.

CoP PCDA curriculum learning outcomes (content):
• Information and Intelligence: 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.6; 3.1; 4.1-4.6
• Response Policing:1.1-1.8; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.5
• Policing Communities: 1.1-1.7; 2.1-2.4; 3.1-3.2
• Policing the Roads: 1.1-1.2
• Conducting investigations: 1.1-1.17; 2.1-2.6; 3.1-3.7; 4.1; 5.1-5.7; 6.1-6.4
The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC6015 -

Evidence Based Policing Dissertation (40 Credits)

You will apply academic knowledge and research skills to practical challenges in contemporary policing. You will pursue an independent project researching a selected topic that is relevant to Durham Constabulary. Throughout this period you will identify, understand, and interpret information about the selected topic; organise that information in order to arrive at and answer a focused research question; and make appropriate use of theory and methodology. You will understand ethical considerations in relation to conducting research. In addressing the topic you will demonstrate understanding of the overall strategic context of policing and professional practice. An important part of the project will be for you to identify potential interventions or applied strategies to address challenges identified in relation to the selected topic. To communicate research outcomes effectively you will be required to provide an executive summary based on your study. The evidence based research project is an integral element forming part of the End Point Assessment.

PCDA CoP curriculum:
Understanding the Police Constable Role (Advanced): 1.1-1.4; 2.1-2.3; 3.1
Evidence-Based Policing/Problem Solving/Research Skills: 1.1-1.6; 2.1-2.9; 3.1

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

DC9617 -

Advanced Professional Policing (20 Credits)

Students will examine key aspects of leadership and communication within the context of contemporary policing. The module builds upon the notions of ‘the profession’, and ‘professional policing’, with ideas about ‘leadership’, ‘coaching’ and ‘mentoring’ and applies them to the contemporary police organisation and those working within it. Students will also examine the ideas of ‘work-based’ and ‘standardised’ assessment and the relationship of these to professional standards within the police service. Students will consider the role of communication in contemporary policing. Communication is not only important to leadership, coaching and mentoring it is a vital aspect of contemporary policing society and so the module also examines media strategy and engagement and the police’s use of social media.


CoP PCDA curriculum learning outcomes:
Leadership and Team Working 1.1-1.6
1 Review key principles of leadership in relation to policing and employ appropriate leadership skills as a police constable
Introduction to Coaching, Mentoring and Assessment 1-1-1.6; 2.1-2.2; 3.1-3.7; 4.1-4.3
1 Explain the skills required to deliver coaching and mentoring support and how these activities can promote professional development
2 Explore how learning from coaching and mentoring sessions can be applied in the workplace
3 Examine the principles of work-based assessment within policing
4 Understand the principles and practices of standardising assessment within the police service in order to ensure that consistent, professional standards are maintained
Communication skills 1-4; 2.1-2.3; 3.1-3.3
1 Use social media as a means of informing and engaging with the community and promoting policing initiatives
2 Understand the principles and processes of an effective communication strategy
3 Know how to deal effectively with the media in a policing context

The full CoP National Policing curriculum will be accessible to module tutors on the module Blackboard Site.

More information

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Police Constable Degree Apprenticeship | Durham Constabulary

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Courses starting in 2021 are offered as a mix of online and face to face teaching due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic.

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