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This Police Constable Degree Apprenticeship (PCDA) is an academic and professional programme jointly delivered by officers from Northumbria Police and academic staff from across Northumbria University. This programme is for officers of Northumbria Police only.  

The programme has been designed and developed to meet the requirements of the College of Policing (CoP), the professional body for all those working in the Police Service, for the professional education of new entrants into policing via a newly-established police constable apprenticeship entry route. 

The core curriculum has been designed by the CoP to be professionally transformative and to reflect the contemporary areas of knowledge, skills, behaviours, and professional practice essential to the 21st century police constable role. These include (but are not limited to):

  • evidence-based policing
  • decision making and discretion
  • criminology and crime prevention
  • pro-active approaches to vulnerability
  • risk and public protection
  • modern policing trends such as digital policing 

Successful completion of all three years of the programme, including completion of the integrated End Point Assessment, will result in the achievement of full competency to operate safely and lawfully as a Police Constable in the workplace (public arena) and achieving a Degree in Professional Policing Practice.

Apprenticeship Standard

Apprenticeship programmes at Northumbria University are designed to support apprentices in acquiring the appropriate knowledge, skills and behaviour and retain the integrity of the apprenticeship standard as defined by IFATE. For further details please consult the IFATE Apprenticeship standards / Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education webpage here.

This Police Constable Degree Apprenticeship (PCDA) is an academic and professional programme jointly delivered by officers from Northumbria Police and academic staff from across Northumbria University. This programme is for officers of Northumbria Police only.  

The programme has been designed and developed to meet the requirements of the College of Policing (CoP), the professional body for all those working in the Police Service, for the professional education of new entrants into policing via a newly-established police constable apprenticeship entry route. 

The core curriculum has been designed by the CoP to be professionally transformative and to reflect the contemporary areas of knowledge, skills, behaviours, and professional practice essential to the 21st century police constable role. These include (but are not limited to):

  • evidence-based policing
  • decision making and discretion
  • criminology and crime prevention
  • pro-active approaches to vulnerability
  • risk and public protection
  • modern policing trends such as digital policing 

Successful completion of all three years of the programme, including completion of the integrated End Point Assessment, will result in the achievement of full competency to operate safely and lawfully as a Police Constable in the workplace (public arena) and achieving a Degree in Professional Policing Practice.

Apprenticeship Standard

Apprenticeship programmes at Northumbria University are designed to support apprentices in acquiring the appropriate knowledge, skills and behaviour and retain the integrity of the apprenticeship standard as defined by IFATE. For further details please consult the IFATE Apprenticeship standards / Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education webpage here.

Course Information

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time

Location
Coach Lane Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Fee Information

Module Information

Information & Application | Northumbria Police

Entry Requirements 2020/21

Standard Entry

Admission onto a higher or degree apprenticeship can only take place if applicants are currently employed and their employer has a training agreement in place with Northumbria University.

Applicants must be employed in a relevant role, with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts directly to their personal and professional work experience.


Potential apprentices will need:

120 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-levels, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas or the International Baccalaureate.

We may also consider applicants who have successfully completed a related Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship, or those with non-standard qualifications, or a significant amount of relevant work-based or professional experience.


Find out how many points your qualifications are worth using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator


English Language Requirements:


International applicants should have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

GCSE Requirements:

It is a condition that you have GCSE grades C/4 or above in English Language and Maths, or Functional Skills English or Maths at level 2 by the End Point Assessment period of your Apprenticeship.

Entry Requirements 2021/22

Standard Entry

Admission onto a higher or degree apprenticeship can only take place if applicants are currently employed and their employer has a training agreement in place with Northumbria University. 

Applicants must be employed in a relevant role, with the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts directly to their personal and professional work experience.


Potential apprentices will need:

120 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-levels, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas or the International Baccalaureate.

We may also consider applicants who have successfully completed a related Level 3 Advanced Apprenticeship, or those with non-standard qualifications, or a significant amount of relevant work-based or professional experience.


Find out how many points your qualifications are worth using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator


English Language Requirements:


International applicants should have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications 

GCSE Requirements:

It is a condition that you have GCSE grades C/4 or above in English Language and Maths, or Functional Skills English or Maths at level 2 by the End Point Assessment period of your Apprenticeship.

If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

AP0420 -

Understanding Police Investigations and Processes (20 Credits)

This module introduces criminal investigations and police processes. The module covers the various stages of the law enforcement process, from the legislation/guidance underpinning information and intelligence to the provision of materials for disclosure by the Crown Prosecution Service. In doing so the module examines broad themes such as how information and intelligence held by other agencies can help police operations to specific ones such as things to consider when responding to an incident. It necessarily covers the fundamental principles, legislation and powers related to such activities as well as the police processes that are derived from these.

The core of the module provides a detailed examination of the processes involved in conduct investigations. Unsurprisingly, this section of the module considers the appropriate approaches and/or processes for both responding to and attending incidents as well as gathering and managing evidence/information and carrying out investigations at the crime scene and elsewhere. In doing so it examines the nature and management of evidence and its use within court process.

In addition, the module considers police ethics and how the police support the vulnerable, victims and witnesses but also the responsibilities and procedures for detaining and escorting suspects to and once within custody. It also explores processes surrounding the building of effective case files such as the securing of evidence and the management of exhibits. It also considers the data protection and the general management of management of information and intelligence

PCDA curriculum learning outcomes:

Week 16-19:
Criminal Justice: 2,7,8,9,10,11, 12
Information and Intelligence: 1-8
Conducting investigations: 1-9

More information

CR4007 -

Introduction to the Police Constable Role and Practice (40 Credits)

This year long module opens with a week-long induction to the PCDA programme that combines an introduction to your police force and to the university. To prepare you for your role as a police constable you will undertake sessions in key topics including understanding the role of the police constable, valuing difference and inclusion, and maintaining professional standards. The university induction prepares you for the academic learning components of the programme through a learning resource introduction, academic learning and research skills sessions, guidance on how to make the best use of available technology within your learning, and overall confidence building in becoming a work-based learner.

Your induction is followed by two weeks of intense sessions around officer personal safety and discretion and decision making before moving on to explore communication skills, wellbeing and resilience, leadership and team working in the context of the police constable role. In week 4 you participate in your first immersion phase where you shadow and observe police officers while on attachment to various shifts. You then move on to learn the legislation and police practice relevant to the role of the police constable on a series of related modules before returning to this module in week 14 for your second immersion phase. This module culminates in an extended period of operational practice, punctuated by additional periods of classroom-based learning on related modules, where you will be expected to apply in the workplace the knowledge and understanding gained from related modules. Preparation for the operation phase takes place in week 20 which is followed by your first supported patrol phase that runs between weeks 21-31, with a second supported patrol phase running between weeks 34-44 and 46-52. During the operational phases you will demonstrate (under appropriate levels of supervision) some supported application and awareness of the competencies relating to the role of the police constable. It is expected that you will achieve Independent Patrol Status towards the end of the practice period.

PCDA curriculum learning outcomes (content):

Classroom Weeks
Understanding the Police Constable Role: (Induction Week 1.1-1.5; 4.1-4.3; 5.1-5.4)
Maintaining Professional Standards: (Induction Week 1.1 – 4.5)
Research Method and Skills: (Induction Week 1.1 – 2.5)
Decision Making and Discretion: (Week Two 1.1-2.4)
Managing Conflict: (Week Two 1.1-10.5) To include completion of the appropriate Core Health and Safety Training Programme, as prescribed by the NPCC.
Communication Skills: (Week Three 1.1 - 2.4)
Wellbeing and Resilience: (Week Three 1.1-1.6)
Vulnerability and Risk: (Week Three 10.1 – 11.1)
Leadership and Team Working: (Week Three 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.4)

Practice Weeks
Understanding the Police Constable Role: 2.1-2.4; 7.1-7.4
Evidence-Based Policing: 4.1 - 4.5
Decision Making and Discretion: 6.1 - 6.5; 7.1 - 7.3
Vulnerability and Risk: 9.1 - 9.14
Public Protection: 4.1 - 4.2; 5.1 - 5.9
Digital Policing: 8.1 - 8.9; 9.1 - 9.5; 10.1 - 10.5; 11.1 - 11.5
Criminal Justice: 4.1-4.3, 5.1 - 5.8; 6.1 - 6.3; 7.1 - 7.8; 9.1 - 9.5; 10.1 - 10.5; 12.1 - 12.6
Response Policing: 3.1-3.5; 4.1 - 4.23; 5.1-5.3; 7.1 - 7.3; 8.1 - 8.15; 9.1-9.7; 10.1-10.4
Valuing Difference and Inclusion: 1.1-1.3; 2.1-2.3
Maintaining Professional Standards: 2.1-2.5; 3.1-3.5
Problem Solving: 2.1-2.5
Communication Skills: 2.1-2.4
Wellbeing and Resilience: 1.1-1.6
Managing Conflict: 10.1-10.5
Victims and Witnesses: 3.1-3.5; 4.1-4.5; 6.1-6.7; 8.1-8.7
Digital Policing: 6.1-6.6; 7.1-7.2
Counter Terrorism: 6.1-6.3; 7.1-7.5
Policing Communities: 4.1-4.4
Policing the Roads: 5.1-5.2; 6.1-6.6; 7.1-7.7
Information and Intelligence: 2.1-2.2; 3.1-3.18
Conducting Investigations: 2.1-2.17; 3.1-3.16; 4.1-4.4; 5.1-5.6; 7.1-7.20

More information

CR4008 -

Policing, Criminal Justice and Society (20 Credits)

You will learn how police operate in terms of processing cases, suspects and supporting victims from the initial response, through the custody and charging process, to courts, prisons and offender management processes. As a result of this you will understand that police operate in a complex environment, interact through partnership building with a broad range of criminal justice, public and private sector, and third sector, organisations and that decisions and processes in those environments impact on what police organisations and staff do. Following on from that you will learn how police officers and staff engagement with the public can have a significant impact on the community and on individuals in terms of reassurance and safety, life-chances and well-being, risk and security. You will learn how an understanding and appreciation of diversity (in broad terms) is significant in terms of demands on police, public expectation, community policing and satisfaction with police services. The importance of human rights to policing and the management of risk is addressed, using case studies and applied examples. Ideas of vulnerability and the different thresholds of vulnerability are explored with reference to examples drawn from fields such as domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, and hate crime, and terrorism and radicalisation, and how police can intervene positively in people’s lives to prevent these issues and other public protection incidents. Police, and other agency responses, in terms of safeguarding are explored in terms of principle and practices. The final part of the module will teach you about Evidence Based Policing and Problem Oriented Policing, examining the principles of these approaches and what they mean for practitioners. You will learn how EBP can shape operational policing and begin to understand how to gather and analyse data and information for evidence based practice.

PCDA curriculum learning outcomes:
You will learn how police operate in terms of processing cases, suspects and victims from the initial response, through the custody and charging process, to courts, prisons and offender management processes. As a result of this you will understand that police operate in a complex environment, interact with a broad range of criminal justice, public and private sector, and third sector, organisations and that decisions and processes in those environments impact on what police organisations and staff do. Following on from that you will learn how police officers and staff engagement with the public can have a significant impact on the community and on individuals in terms of reassurance and safety, life-chances and well-being, risk and security. You will learn how diversity (in broad terms) is significant in terms of demands on police, public expectation, and satisfaction with police services. The importance of human rights to policing and the management of risk is addressed, using case studies and applied examples. Ideas of vulnerability are explored with reference to examples drawn from fields such as domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse and hate crime. Police, and other agency responses, in terms of safeguarding are explored in terms of principle and practices. The final part of the module will teach you about Evidence Based Policing and Problem Oriented Policing, examining the principles of these approaches and what they mean for practitioners. You will learn how EBP can shape operational policing and begin to understand how to gather and analyse data and information for evidence-based practice.

PCDA curriculum learning outcomes:

Week One

Understanding the police constable role LO 7.1

Valuing difference and inclusion LO 1-2

Vulnerability and risk LO 1-9, 12

Criminal justice LO 1, 3-4, 13-14

Week Two

Understanding the police constable role LO 2-3

Counter terrorism LO 1-7

Victims and witnesses LO 1-8


Week Three

Evidence based policing LO 1-4

Problem solving LO 1-2

Research Methods and Skills LO 3-6

Criminology and crime prevention LO 1-3

Public protection LO 1-6

Policing communities LO 1-5

More information

KV4003 -

Digital Policing (20 Credits)

In this module you will develop an understanding of how technology may be used in everyday policing to support the development of an effective digital policing capability. This is followed by an introduction to concepts of digital technology and common digital technology crimes, in particular the prevalence of digital technology and the basic techniques associated with gathering, preserving and presenting digital evidence

You will be taught the appropriate initial response to a crime scene involving digital technology and how to undertake a thorough and conscientious examination of a crime scene for digital evidence and recognise the importance to protect evidential integrity and the need to document all actions. You will also be provided with an introduction to particular legislation and offences associated with digital technology ensuring it will be admissible in a court of law.

In the context of digital policing you will gain an understand of the principles and practices of effective team-working.

Finally what actions and advice can be given to an individual who is vulnerable to internet-facilitated crime will be discussed as well as the provision of support to victims of internet-facilitated crime.


PCDA curriculum learning outcomes:

Week 31-32:
Digital Policing: 1.1-1.6; 2.2-2.3; 4.2; 5.1-5.3; 6.3-6.6; 7.1-7.2
Conducting Investigations: 2.14
Victims and Witnesses: 5.2-5.3

More information

LW4015 -

The Police Constable and the Law (20 Credits)

This module will introduce students to the criminal law, police powers and procedures, such as arrest, stop and search and making seizures, including how police powers are to be used ethically and professionally to detect crimes, protect the public and police the roads. This will include gaining an understanding of relevant legislation and guidance associated with different forms of policing. The module will consider general themes and principles in relation to the role of the police constable and the law, while introducing students specifically to:

• Understanding how to exercise police powers and procedures fairly and without bias, including recording incidents, powers of arrest, stop and search, and making seizures while respecting the core principles of equality, diversity and human rights.
• How to protect the public and police the roads.
• An overview of the criminal law in England and Wales and how to apply points to prove to practical arrest scenarios.

The module will cover the following Learning Outcomes from the Policing Education Qualifications Framework (PEQF):

Understanding the Police Constable Role 6.1, 6.2, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.4
Public Protection 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 5.6
Decision making & Discretion 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.1 - 4.10
Criminology & Crime Prevention 3.1, 3.2
Criminal Justice 1.3, 4.2, 4.3, 5.1, 5.2 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, 5.7 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, 10, 10.1, 10.2
Response Policing 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 2.4, 2.5, 5.1 - 5.3, 6. - 6.4, 7.1 - 7.3, 8.1 – 8.15,
Roads Policing, 1.1 – 1.6 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 3.1 – 3.3 4.1, 4.2 5.1, 5.2 6.1 – 6.6 7.1 – 7.7
Conducting Investigations 1.2

More information

DA5054 -

Introduction to Policing Practice in Key Areas (40 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DA5055 -

Professional Policing, Risk and Vulnerability (20 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DA5056 -

Resilience and the Police Organisation (20 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DA5057 -

Research Methods for Police Constables (20 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DA5058 -

Networking Technology and Internet-related Crime (20 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DA6048 -

Advanced Professional Development (40 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DA6049 -

End Point Assessment (60 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

DA6050 -

Advanced Professional Policing (20 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

Police Constable Degree Apprenticeship | Northumbria Police

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Any Questions?

Our admissions team will be happy to help. They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901.

Contact Details for Applicants:

bc.applicantservices@northumbria.ac.uk

All information on this course page is accurate at the time of viewing.

Our Campus based courses starting in 2022 and 2023 will be delivered on-campus with supporting online learning content. We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to adjust the delivery of our education accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

On-campus contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with any additional restrictions, which may be imposed by the Government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors. This could potentially mean increased or fully online delivery, should such restrictions on in-person contact time be required.

 

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.


Your Learning Experience find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions - northumbria.ac.uk/terms
Fees and Funding - northumbria.ac.uk/fees
Admissions Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy
Admissions Complaints Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/complaints





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