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The last intake for this course is Sept 2022/23. For 2023/24 entry, please visit BSc (Hons) Computer Science.

Demand is strong for graduates with the skills and expertise to develop and maintain the highly usable, dynamic websites and innovative web applications that are a key part of modern life and business with most organisations now having an online presence.

BSc (Hons) Computer Science with Web Development covers a broad range of computing specialisms and will open the door to a vast range of careers within this industry.

From day one, you will be immersed in an exciting, innovative environment where you will develop your theoretical and technical knowledge and skills which will be directly relatable to your future career.

You'll work in dedicated facilities to learn the skills you need to develop dynamic and responsive web based systems.

See similar courses in our portfolio, and explore our range of IT and computing programmes, including our Games Computing BSc (Hons) and Business Computing BSc (Hons).

Northumbria is ranked 5th in the sector nationally and 1st in the North East for the sustained employment of Computer Science graduates one year after graduation. (Longitudinal Education Outcomes (LEO) 2017)

Accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered IT Professional. (British Computing Society (BCS) 2019)

Accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirements for incorporated Engineer and partially meeting the academic requirement for a Chartered Engineer  (British Computing Society (BCS) 2019)

 

Course Information

UCAS Code
G404

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years Full Time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Computer and Information Sciences

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Fees
Fee Information

Modules
Module Information

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Book an Open Day / Experience Computer Science with Web Development BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Computer Science with Web Development. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Entry Requirements 2024/25

Standard Entry

120 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, T Level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants should have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2024/25 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1: TBC

* The maximum tuition fee that we are permitted to charge for UK students is set by government. Tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, these are subject to government regulations and in line with inflation.


EU Fee in Year 1: TBC

International Fee in Year 1: TBC


Please see the main Funding Pages for 24/25 scholarship information.

 


ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

How to Apply

Please use the Apply Now button at the top of this page to submit your application.

Certain applications may need to be submitted via an external application system, such as UCAS, Lawcabs or DfE Apply.

The Apply Now button will redirect you to the relevant website if this is the case.

You can find further application advice, such as what to include in your application and what happens after you apply, on our Admissions Hub Admissions | Northumbria University



Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KF5002 -

Web Programming (Core,20 Credits)

The module aims to provide you with knowledge of the principles and practice of developing dynamic, interactive web sites and applications using both server-side and client-side technologies and of issues relating to their use. This will include the retrieval and processing of structured data and its integration to create standards compliant web interfaces. The storage and manipulation of structured data, especially in relational databases, within a web based system will also be covered. A consideration of relevant security issues and methods of working with the Document Object Model (DOM) to manipulate web application interfaces will also be provided. In particular, you will cover the following topics:

• Database applications on the web and their components: database integration and database driven web based systems, database connectivity, manipulating relational database data – record insertion, updating and deletion
• Introduction to other structured data sources, e.g. XML or JSON.
• Retrieving, processing and displaying data from structured data sources to create standards compliant, device agnostic, and accessible web interfaces.
• Client-side and server-side validation of user input and other security issues. Working with user sessions
• Working with the Document Object Model (DOM) to manipulate web application interfaces.
• Asynchronous Javascript and XML (AJAX): the XMLHTTPRequest object, communicating with a web server, parsing and displaying the returned structured data.

More information

KF5008 -

Program Design and Development (Core,20 Credits)

You will extend your understanding of system development in this module. In particular, you will cover program design issues within the context of an industry-standard approach. You will learn how to implement designs, including the selection, implementation and processing of appropriate data structures and algorithms, and how to evaluate design models and appreciate the place of these models within a software development approach.

You will develop your knowledge of design by gaining understanding of the principles and concepts upon which design depends. In addition, you will learn to apply an industry-standard approach for design and employ appropriate modelling tools. You will also develop an understanding of the issues involved with the implementation of such models, including the selection and implementation of data structures.

More information

KF5012 -

Software Engineering Practice (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about the principles of software engineering and the management of software engineering projects. You will apply these in the context of a small development project and relate then to your other studies. In addition, you will see how the various skills in project management and software engineering combine to aid the delivery of a successful outcome in a commercial and economic context.

The module aims to help you understand the skills required in employment (and your continuing education) in your subject area and to apply them to complete a project, achieving a level of understanding of employer requirements.

More information

KF5042 -

Intelligent Systems (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to provide you with a broad introduction to the core areas of artificial intelligence with a focus on applications, tools and technologies used in building intelligent systems. You will learn key theoretical concepts and research advances in intelligent systems as well as state-of-the-art techniques such as knowledge representation, machine learning, data and text mining, natural language processing and understanding, and biologically inspired computing. You will learn how intelligent systems allow computers to represent, process and learn from data. You will also explore current and future applications of AI and how various AI techniques have been used to solve practical problems. Additionally, you will learn how to appropriately select from a range of AI techniques and tools to solve practical problems in different application domains. Furthermore, you will learn how to conduct performance evaluation of intelligent systems.

In particular, you will cover topics such as:

• An introduction to AI techniques, tools and applications used in intelligent systems
• Machine learning
• Biologically inspired computing
• Search, heuristics and optimisation techniques
• Data and text mining
• Natural language processing and understanding
• Data visualisation
• Selected key application areas of intelligent systems such as:
- Computer vision and digital forensics
- Biometrics, face detection and recognition
- Affective computing
- Information retrieval
- Sentiment analysis
- Intelligent robotics
- AI in games / VR / movie making

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5002 -

Computer Networks, Security and Operating Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the fundamentals of computer networks, security and operating systems, including: network architecture and the five-layer Internet protocol stack, processes/threads, inter-process communication, memory management, file systems, and operating systems and network security. You will study:
* network architecture: the five-layer Internet protocol stack (application, transport, network, datalink, and physical layers), switching techniques (e.g. circuit and packet), protocols (e.g. TCP, UDP, IP);
* processes and threads: concepts, use and implementation, creation and destruction, context switching, scheduling, synchronisation;
* inter-process communication: shared memory, message passing, pipes, sockets;
* memory management: memory allocation schemes, paging, virtual memory;
* file systems: file concept, file system structure and implementation, directories, free space allocation;
* operating system and network security: confidentiality, integrity, availability, threats and attacks (e.g. denial of service, spoofing, man-in-the-middle), access control, user authentication, cryptography for data and network security, secure network protocols (e.g. TLS/SSL).

More information

KV5003 -

Human Computer Interaction (Core,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), a field of study focusing on the design of computer technology and, in particular, the interaction between humans (the users) and computers. It brings together multiple disciplines, such as computer science, the social sciences, design and human-factors engineering. In addition to the underlying principles and theories we will engage critically with contemporary HCI research.

Specific topics we will cover will include, but will not be limited to, the following:

• User-centred design lifecycle
• Understanding human capabilities (visual and auditory perception, ergonomics, cognitive models); Social models that inform interaction design, e.g., culture, communication, networks and organizations; Accessibility
• Understanding context: Requirements capture methods
• Understanding design: Usability heuristics and evaluation; User interface standards
• Interface paradigms and metaphors; Principles of good interface design
• Prototyping techniques for interface design
• Evaluation methods: expert appraisal and user-led

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5007 -

Work placement year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

More information

KV5008 -

Study abroad year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV6002 -

Team Project and Professionalism (Core,20 Credits)

This module functions as a “capstone” to your Batchelor studies. The module gives you the opportunity to work in a team to build a computing product directly related to your programme of study. This develops and demonstrates your skills in leadership, team work, project management, planning, communication (both written and oral) as well as technical skills in the technology you choose to implement in. This module aims to give you further experience of team working in the specialism you have selected which is an invaluable asset and highly prized by employers. The project and its potential future commercial exploitation provide a context for you to critically evaluate your and your team’s performance, the fitness for purpose of the product you have developed and the legal, ethical, professional and social content of your chosen specialism. Appropriate Information Security factors will be considered as part of this evaluation. As part of this learning journey you will also explore the associated commercial and economic factors.

You will have the opportunity to apply a wide range of development skills (in specification, design and implementation) to your product development. All products will consider all aspects of the development life cycle. Some projects may be driven by research activity in the department’s research groups, some by the expectations of a “client” and some by students’ own interests. A “client” is a non-fictitious potential benefactor of the project for example a student’s employer, former placement provider, local charity etc. who are willing to formally consent to be involved in the project.

Wider Legal, Ethical, Social and Professional implications will be examined to enable you to appreciate the responsibilities involved in the development and use of computer products both in work and throughout society.

More information

KV6011 -

Business Intelligence (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce the key elements of business intelligence and organisational decision making. Drawing on business analytics, decision science and systems thinking, you will explore how organisations are able to leverage data and information to formulate a complete understanding of complex problems and to identify and implement optimal solutions. Employers are looking for data-literate graduates with the ability to explore and solve novel business problems, and as such, this module will cover topics such as organisational process modelling, business performance management, data analytics in a business context, and the use of data visualisation as a tool for exploration and communication. You will have to the opportunity to work with others in collaborative problem-solving scenarios, to investigate how businesses can use effective decision making to achieve optimal, sustainable solutions, and to explore the ethical, legal, and societal issues present when using data-driven technologies.

More information

KV6012 -

Cloud Computing (Core,20 Credits)

This module you will provide foundational knowledge of Cloud Computing whilst also exposing you to more complex cloud services used throughout industry. Cloud Computing allows organisations across all sectors to leverage innovation and business advantage through subscription services. Through the cloud businesses can access key technologies such as file storage, networking, virtual servers and software deployment tools. You will learn the theoretical concepts of Cloud Computing and develop practical skills for using a wide range of services commonly used within industry. The skills you acquire in this module will be applicable to digital roles in all sectors including learning how to scope out a cloud solution, understanding how to manage budgets and resources, learning how to create a virtual server to specific client requirements, and learning a range of programming skills for building and configuring cloud environments. You will also develop skills in critically interpreting current practice, for non-technical colleagues. That is, you will be able to explain the implications of adapting new technologies in relation to their cost benefits to your future colleagues or employees. The assessment will involve designing, constructing, and provisioning an appropriate Cloud Computing resource for a given scenario.

Through a number of guest lectures given by experts working in cloud delivery roles you will have an opportunity to gain insights into the kind of core cloud skills employers require. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research rich learning. The assessment is made of 3 components 1) Practical demonstration of configuring cloud services for a given scenario (60%); 2) A written report (max 2000 words) which demonstrates a critical reflection of your cloud solution (40%).

More information

KV6013 -

Computing Project (Core,40 Credits)

This is your major final year project module where you will undertake a substantial individual practical computing project related to your programme of study. You will become knowledgeable in your chosen topic including important concepts and literature. You will use and further develop skills learnt elsewhere in your programme and acquire new skills and expertise to carry out the practical computing work. These could be technical skills such as a new programming language, experimental methods, and/or the use of statistical techniques to analyse your results. You will also acquire or further develop your professional skills including communication skills (both oral presentation and report writing), literature searching and review, research methods and design, project management and personal time management. Both the technical and professional skills developed through the project module will enhance your career and employability competencies.

You will have the freedom to choose a topic of your interest or select one provided by academic staff. Your project must include you undertaking practical work of some sort using computing/IT technology. This is most frequently achieved by the creation of an artefact as the focus for covering all or part of an implementation lifecycle. However, there are a diversity of approaches you can take. For example, you could choose to conduct a more product-focused project where the main deliverable is a product of some kind such as a piece of software, a game, a computer network, an information strategy. Or it could be a more investigative and/or research-focused project such as a digital forensics investigation, a comparison analysis of AI algorithms, a user experience investigation. Or your project could be a mix of both such as building a simulated network to investigate security vulnerabilities and mitigation schemes, creating a prototype to test the effectiveness of a digital technology. Projects based solely on literature review activity and/or user/market surveys are not acceptable. You could also work with an external enterprise client to create a product in terms of their business requirements.

More information

KV6015 -

Data Analytics (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you an essential foundation to focus on how to conduct statistical analysis and interpret various measures correctly. You will learn to think about the process of examining data from the “ground up”, adopting pragmatic approaches e.g., how to investigate and explore data, data structures and visualisations.

‘Data Analytics’ will prepare you for the study of the computational principles, methods, and systems for extracting and structuring knowledge from data. It will also prepare you for the application and use of those principles. For example, large data sets are now generated by almost every activity in science, society, and commerce - ranging from molecular biology to social media, from sustainable energy to health care. You will explore methods to conduct efficient and pragmatic approaches to ensure you have translational skills.

During ‘Data Analytics’ you will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs. Your learning will be research-rich by providing you opportunities to link with active research groups tackling real world problems to prepare you for life beyond Northumbria. The main element in assessment (100%) will be a final assignment that will bring together all your new skills and techniques.

More information

KV6016 -

Data Security and Governance (Core,20 Credits)

This module is set in the context of today’s society and the organisations within. Social behaviour, often in the virtual environment, creates a range of ethical issues centering on information security and governance. In addition to exploring these social and ethical issues, legal and regulatory frameworks that have been developed in recent years to try to address these issues are examined. You will also learn about security in organisations and will be introduced to a range of common threats and countermeasures. Topics include basic definitions of terminology alongside practical and theoretical frameworks to help you identify key governance and security issues and explore potential preventative measures. You will be covering terms such as ‘governance’ and ‘security’, frameworks which include the information life cycle, regulations and guidelines relating to professional conduct, privacy and data protection,

More information

KV6018 -

Evolutionary Computation (Optional,20 Credits)

Evolutionary algorithms (EAs) are a class of optimisation techniques that are inspired by natural evolution. They are well-suited to problems for which no specific solution method exists, or where other methods perform badly, and they have been used very successfully in areas as diverse as finance, engineering, architecture and logistics. In this module, you will learn about the fundamental principles of EAs, understand how (and why) they are used, and develop your own EA for a specific problem.

EAs are used extensively in business, industry, and scientific research, and the ability to analyse a problem and develop an EA to solve it demonstrates a number of sought-after key skills.

This module is research-driven, and is taught by academics who have published extensively in the field of evolutionary computation. You will benefit from access to up-to-date knowledge, codebases and datasets.

The main component of assessment is a development assignment (70%), which will bring together the skills and techniques that you will acquire during the course of the module.

Indicative list of topics:

• Natural and artificial evolution
• Representation schemes and search operators for optimisation
• Constrained and multi-objective optimisation
• Evaluation of evolutionary algorithm performance
• Theoretical foundations
• State-of-the-art applications

More information

KV6022 -

Robotics & Automation (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you a deep understanding of the implementation and programming of robot technologie as autonomous systems. You will have practical experience with using the math underlying robot programming and design, including kinematics, probability and geometry. You will be taught about the components, sensor arrays and programming frameworks that make up a modern robotic system. You will research and develop a small robot that is designed for a specific industrial application, for example a warehouse stock and material transport robot, a localisation and mapping robot or a driverless vehicle. Each implementation of a robotic system will use main control architecture, state of the art sensor fusion techniques that enable localisation, obstacle avoidance, vision algorithms, path planning or navigation. The module will also cover emergent ethical and safety issues related to robotics and automation.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KF5002 -

Web Programming (Core,20 Credits)

The module aims to provide you with knowledge of the principles and practice of developing dynamic, interactive web sites and applications using both server-side and client-side technologies and of issues relating to their use. This will include the retrieval and processing of structured data and its integration to create standards compliant web interfaces. The storage and manipulation of structured data, especially in relational databases, within a web based system will also be covered. A consideration of relevant security issues and methods of working with the Document Object Model (DOM) to manipulate web application interfaces will also be provided. In particular, you will cover the following topics:

• Database applications on the web and their components: database integration and database driven web based systems, database connectivity, manipulating relational database data – record insertion, updating and deletion
• Introduction to other structured data sources, e.g. XML or JSON.
• Retrieving, processing and displaying data from structured data sources to create standards compliant, device agnostic, and accessible web interfaces.
• Client-side and server-side validation of user input and other security issues. Working with user sessions
• Working with the Document Object Model (DOM) to manipulate web application interfaces.
• Asynchronous Javascript and XML (AJAX): the XMLHTTPRequest object, communicating with a web server, parsing and displaying the returned structured data.

More information

KF5008 -

Program Design and Development (Core,20 Credits)

You will extend your understanding of system development in this module. In particular, you will cover program design issues within the context of an industry-standard approach. You will learn how to implement designs, including the selection, implementation and processing of appropriate data structures and algorithms, and how to evaluate design models and appreciate the place of these models within a software development approach.

You will develop your knowledge of design by gaining understanding of the principles and concepts upon which design depends. In addition, you will learn to apply an industry-standard approach for design and employ appropriate modelling tools. You will also develop an understanding of the issues involved with the implementation of such models, including the selection and implementation of data structures.

More information

KF5012 -

Software Engineering Practice (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about the principles of software engineering and the management of software engineering projects. You will apply these in the context of a small development project and relate then to your other studies. In addition, you will see how the various skills in project management and software engineering combine to aid the delivery of a successful outcome in a commercial and economic context.

The module aims to help you understand the skills required in employment (and your continuing education) in your subject area and to apply them to complete a project, achieving a level of understanding of employer requirements.

More information

KF5042 -

Intelligent Systems (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to provide you with a broad introduction to the core areas of artificial intelligence with a focus on applications, tools and technologies used in building intelligent systems. You will learn key theoretical concepts and research advances in intelligent systems as well as state-of-the-art techniques such as knowledge representation, machine learning, data and text mining, natural language processing and understanding, and biologically inspired computing. You will learn how intelligent systems allow computers to represent, process and learn from data. You will also explore current and future applications of AI and how various AI techniques have been used to solve practical problems. Additionally, you will learn how to appropriately select from a range of AI techniques and tools to solve practical problems in different application domains. Furthermore, you will learn how to conduct performance evaluation of intelligent systems.

In particular, you will cover topics such as:

• An introduction to AI techniques, tools and applications used in intelligent systems
• Machine learning
• Biologically inspired computing
• Search, heuristics and optimisation techniques
• Data and text mining
• Natural language processing and understanding
• Data visualisation
• Selected key application areas of intelligent systems such as:
- Computer vision and digital forensics
- Biometrics, face detection and recognition
- Affective computing
- Information retrieval
- Sentiment analysis
- Intelligent robotics
- AI in games / VR / movie making

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5002 -

Computer Networks, Security and Operating Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the fundamentals of computer networks, security and operating systems, including: network architecture and the five-layer Internet protocol stack, processes/threads, inter-process communication, memory management, file systems, and operating systems and network security. You will study:
* network architecture: the five-layer Internet protocol stack (application, transport, network, datalink, and physical layers), switching techniques (e.g. circuit and packet), protocols (e.g. TCP, UDP, IP);
* processes and threads: concepts, use and implementation, creation and destruction, context switching, scheduling, synchronisation;
* inter-process communication: shared memory, message passing, pipes, sockets;
* memory management: memory allocation schemes, paging, virtual memory;
* file systems: file concept, file system structure and implementation, directories, free space allocation;
* operating system and network security: confidentiality, integrity, availability, threats and attacks (e.g. denial of service, spoofing, man-in-the-middle), access control, user authentication, cryptography for data and network security, secure network protocols (e.g. TLS/SSL).

More information

KV5003 -

Human Computer Interaction (Core,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), a field of study focusing on the design of computer technology and, in particular, the interaction between humans (the users) and computers. It brings together multiple disciplines, such as computer science, the social sciences, design and human-factors engineering. In addition to the underlying principles and theories we will engage critically with contemporary HCI research.

Specific topics we will cover will include, but will not be limited to, the following:

• User-centred design lifecycle
• Understanding human capabilities (visual and auditory perception, ergonomics, cognitive models); Social models that inform interaction design, e.g., culture, communication, networks and organizations; Accessibility
• Understanding context: Requirements capture methods
• Understanding design: Usability heuristics and evaluation; User interface standards
• Interface paradigms and metaphors; Principles of good interface design
• Prototyping techniques for interface design
• Evaluation methods: expert appraisal and user-led

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5007 -

Work placement year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

More information

KV5008 -

Study abroad year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV6002 -

Team Project and Professionalism (Core,20 Credits)

This module functions as a “capstone” to your Batchelor studies. The module gives you the opportunity to work in a team to build a computing product directly related to your programme of study. This develops and demonstrates your skills in leadership, team work, project management, planning, communication (both written and oral) as well as technical skills in the technology you choose to implement in. This module aims to give you further experience of team working in the specialism you have selected which is an invaluable asset and highly prized by employers. The project and its potential future commercial exploitation provide a context for you to critically evaluate your and your team’s performance, the fitness for purpose of the product you have developed and the legal, ethical, professional and social content of your chosen specialism. Appropriate Information Security factors will be considered as part of this evaluation. As part of this learning journey you will also explore the associated commercial and economic factors.

You will have the opportunity to apply a wide range of development skills (in specification, design and implementation) to your product development. All products will consider all aspects of the development life cycle. Some projects may be driven by research activity in the department’s research groups, some by the expectations of a “client” and some by students’ own interests. A “client” is a non-fictitious potential benefactor of the project for example a student’s employer, former placement provider, local charity etc. who are willing to formally consent to be involved in the project.

Wider Legal, Ethical, Social and Professional implications will be examined to enable you to appreciate the responsibilities involved in the development and use of computer products both in work and throughout society.

More information

KV6011 -

Business Intelligence (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce the key elements of business intelligence and organisational decision making. Drawing on business analytics, decision science and systems thinking, you will explore how organisations are able to leverage data and information to formulate a complete understanding of complex problems and to identify and implement optimal solutions. Employers are looking for data-literate graduates with the ability to explore and solve novel business problems, and as such, this module will cover topics such as organisational process modelling, business performance management, data analytics in a business context, and the use of data visualisation as a tool for exploration and communication. You will have to the opportunity to work with others in collaborative problem-solving scenarios, to investigate how businesses can use effective decision making to achieve optimal, sustainable solutions, and to explore the ethical, legal, and societal issues present when using data-driven technologies.

More information

KV6012 -

Cloud Computing (Core,20 Credits)

This module you will provide foundational knowledge of Cloud Computing whilst also exposing you to more complex cloud services used throughout industry. Cloud Computing allows organisations across all sectors to leverage innovation and business advantage through subscription services. Through the cloud businesses can access key technologies such as file storage, networking, virtual servers and software deployment tools. You will learn the theoretical concepts of Cloud Computing and develop practical skills for using a wide range of services commonly used within industry. The skills you acquire in this module will be applicable to digital roles in all sectors including learning how to scope out a cloud solution, understanding how to manage budgets and resources, learning how to create a virtual server to specific client requirements, and learning a range of programming skills for building and configuring cloud environments. You will also develop skills in critically interpreting current practice, for non-technical colleagues. That is, you will be able to explain the implications of adapting new technologies in relation to their cost benefits to your future colleagues or employees. The assessment will involve designing, constructing, and provisioning an appropriate Cloud Computing resource for a given scenario.

Through a number of guest lectures given by experts working in cloud delivery roles you will have an opportunity to gain insights into the kind of core cloud skills employers require. You will also critically engage with research outputs as part of your research rich learning. The assessment is made of 3 components 1) Practical demonstration of configuring cloud services for a given scenario (60%); 2) A written report (max 2000 words) which demonstrates a critical reflection of your cloud solution (40%).

More information

KV6013 -

Computing Project (Core,40 Credits)

This is your major final year project module where you will undertake a substantial individual practical computing project related to your programme of study. You will become knowledgeable in your chosen topic including important concepts and literature. You will use and further develop skills learnt elsewhere in your programme and acquire new skills and expertise to carry out the practical computing work. These could be technical skills such as a new programming language, experimental methods, and/or the use of statistical techniques to analyse your results. You will also acquire or further develop your professional skills including communication skills (both oral presentation and report writing), literature searching and review, research methods and design, project management and personal time management. Both the technical and professional skills developed through the project module will enhance your career and employability competencies.

You will have the freedom to choose a topic of your interest or select one provided by academic staff. Your project must include you undertaking practical work of some sort using computing/IT technology. This is most frequently achieved by the creation of an artefact as the focus for covering all or part of an implementation lifecycle. However, there are a diversity of approaches you can take. For example, you could choose to conduct a more product-focused project where the main deliverable is a product of some kind such as a piece of software, a game, a computer network, an information strategy. Or it could be a more investigative and/or research-focused project such as a digital forensics investigation, a comparison analysis of AI algorithms, a user experience investigation. Or your project could be a mix of both such as building a simulated network to investigate security vulnerabilities and mitigation schemes, creating a prototype to test the effectiveness of a digital technology. Projects based solely on literature review activity and/or user/market surveys are not acceptable. You could also work with an external enterprise client to create a product in terms of their business requirements.

More information

KV6015 -

Data Analytics (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you an essential foundation to focus on how to conduct statistical analysis and interpret various measures correctly. You will learn to think about the process of examining data from the “ground up”, adopting pragmatic approaches e.g., how to investigate and explore data, data structures and visualisations.

‘Data Analytics’ will prepare you for the study of the computational principles, methods, and systems for extracting and structuring knowledge from data. It will also prepare you for the application and use of those principles. For example, large data sets are now generated by almost every activity in science, society, and commerce - ranging from molecular biology to social media, from sustainable energy to health care. You will explore methods to conduct efficient and pragmatic approaches to ensure you have translational skills.

During ‘Data Analytics’ you will work through a series of exercises, making use of Northumbria’s state-of-the-art computer labs. Your learning will be research-rich by providing you opportunities to link with active research groups tackling real world problems to prepare you for life beyond Northumbria. The main element in assessment (100%) will be a final assignment that will bring together all your new skills and techniques.

More information

KV6016 -

Data Security and Governance (Core,20 Credits)

This module is set in the context of today’s society and the organisations within. Social behaviour, often in the virtual environment, creates a range of ethical issues centering on information security and governance. In addition to exploring these social and ethical issues, legal and regulatory frameworks that have been developed in recent years to try to address these issues are examined. You will also learn about security in organisations and will be introduced to a range of common threats and countermeasures. Topics include basic definitions of terminology alongside practical and theoretical frameworks to help you identify key governance and security issues and explore potential preventative measures. You will be covering terms such as ‘governance’ and ‘security’, frameworks which include the information life cycle, regulations and guidelines relating to professional conduct, privacy and data protection,

More information

KV6018 -

Evolutionary Computation (Optional,20 Credits)

Evolutionary algorithms (EAs) are a class of optimisation techniques that are inspired by natural evolution. They are well-suited to problems for which no specific solution method exists, or where other methods perform badly, and they have been used very successfully in areas as diverse as finance, engineering, architecture and logistics. In this module, you will learn about the fundamental principles of EAs, understand how (and why) they are used, and develop your own EA for a specific problem.

EAs are used extensively in business, industry, and scientific research, and the ability to analyse a problem and develop an EA to solve it demonstrates a number of sought-after key skills.

This module is research-driven, and is taught by academics who have published extensively in the field of evolutionary computation. You will benefit from access to up-to-date knowledge, codebases and datasets.

The main component of assessment is a development assignment (70%), which will bring together the skills and techniques that you will acquire during the course of the module.

Indicative list of topics:

• Natural and artificial evolution
• Representation schemes and search operators for optimisation
• Constrained and multi-objective optimisation
• Evaluation of evolutionary algorithm performance
• Theoretical foundations
• State-of-the-art applications

More information

KV6022 -

Robotics & Automation (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will give you a deep understanding of the implementation and programming of robot technologie as autonomous systems. You will have practical experience with using the math underlying robot programming and design, including kinematics, probability and geometry. You will be taught about the components, sensor arrays and programming frameworks that make up a modern robotic system. You will research and develop a small robot that is designed for a specific industrial application, for example a warehouse stock and material transport robot, a localisation and mapping robot or a driverless vehicle. Each implementation of a robotic system will use main control architecture, state of the art sensor fusion techniques that enable localisation, obstacle avoidance, vision algorithms, path planning or navigation. The module will also cover emergent ethical and safety issues related to robotics and automation.

More information

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

Computer Science with Web Development BSc (Hons)

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

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Any Questions?

Our Applicant Services team will be happy to help.  They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901 or by using our Contact Form.



Accessibility and Student Inclusion

Northumbria University is committed to developing an inclusive, diverse and accessible campus and wider University community and are determined to ensure that opportunities we provide are open to all.

We are proud to work in partnership with AccessAble to provide Detailed Access Guides to our buildings and facilities across our City, Coach Lane and London Campuses. A Detailed Access Guide lets you know what access will be like when you visit somewhere. It looks at the route you will use getting in and what is available inside. All guides have Accessibility Symbols that give you a quick overview of what is available, and photographs to show you what to expect. The guides are produced by trained surveyors who visit our campuses annually to ensure you have trusted and accurate information.

You can use Northumbria’s AccessAble Guides anytime to check the accessibility of a building or facility and to plan your routes and journeys. Search by location, building or accessibility feature to find the information you need. 

We are dedicated to helping students who may require additional support during their student journey and offer 1-1 advice and guidance appropriate to individual requirements. If you feel you may need additional support you can find out more about what we offer here where you can also contact us with any questions you may have:

Accessibility support

Student Inclusion support




All information is accurate at the time of sharing. 

Full time Courses are primarily delivered via on-campus face to face learning but could include elements of online learning. Most courses run as planned and as promoted on our website and via our marketing materials, but if there are any substantial changes (as determined by the Competition and Markets Authority) to a course or there is the potential that course may be withdrawn, we will notify all affected applicants as soon as possible with advice and guidance regarding their options. It is also important to be aware that optional modules listed on course pages may be subject to change depending on uptake numbers each year.  

Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with possible restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors if this is deemed necessary in future.

 

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