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Leading European role for Northumbria sports lecturer

30th September 2015

A sports lecturer from Northumbria University has been elected to the prestigious role of Vice President of the European Association of Sport Management.

Ruth Crabtree, a principal lecturer in sports management and development, is responsible for the international development of Northumbria University’s Department of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation.

Her research specialises in sport tourism, with a particular focus on how to manage national parks and tourism in Australia, North America and New Zealand, and has received attention from around the world.

Ruth is already a member of the executive board of the World Association of Sport Management and an advisor to the African Sport Business Association. She was elected to the role of Vice President at the Association’s annual meeting in Dublin this month.

The European Association of Sport Management aims to promote and encourage scientific research into sport management and to develop professional practice, teaching and learning excellence in the subject. The Association works with many international sport federations, non-government organisations and higher education institutions, as well as the sport management industry.

Speaking about her new position she said: “This is a great honour to represent Europe on the world stage and it is also a pleasure to be working with some of the key people in the world associated with sport management. It is an exciting time and a great opportunity to learn, develop and implement good practice internationally.

“I hope to support Northumbria’s already rich history in providing sports courses by developing links and partnerships with other leading universities across Europe.”

Per Goran Fahlstrom, President of the European Association of Sport Management, added: “Ruth has made great efforts for EASM over a number of years. Her impressive global network is of significant importance to me as President, and the Board. Her intercultural awareness and ability to work with people from many different countries is extremely useful. I am delighted that she has been elected Vice President.”

Northumbria was one of the first universities in the UK to begin offering sports courses more than 30 years ago. It is now ranked as one of the top ten sport universities in the country with a strong reputation for teaching and research in physiology, strength and conditioning, exercise science and sports management and coaching.

Students benefit from teaching in specialist physiology, biomechanics and nutrition laboratories; strength and conditioning suites; and an indoor sprint track, as well as the University’s Clinical Skills Centre and £30 million Sport Central facility. Many programmes are accredited and endorsed by professional national governing bodies and students are able to undertake work placements at organisations including the Football Association, the International Olympic Committee and organisations including Adidas and England Netball.

For more information visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/sportrehab

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