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Dr Paul Jowsey

Senior Lecturer

Department: Applied Sciences

Paul obtained a BSc in Biochemistry from Newcastle University in 1999 before completing a PhD at the Cancer Research Unit at the same Institution.  His PhD studies focused on the characterisation of novel post-translational modifications of the p53 tumour suppressor protein.  Such studies have been a common theme in Paul’s postdoctoral research, including 3.5 years at the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit (University of Dundee), before returning to Newcastle University in 2006. 

 

Since 2006, research interests have included studies to define the genotoxic mechanism of sulphur mustard (a chemical warfare agent), studies to investigate potential adverse effects associated with medical radiation (e.g. X-rays that can cause DNA damage), as well as the identification and characterisation of post-translational modifications in DNA damage response proteins.  Paul has published regularly in peer-reviewed journals and obtained independent grant income to pursue his research interests.  Alongside his research, Paul also lectured in the areas of ‘Cell Death’, ‘Genotoxicology’ and ‘Genotoxicology & Carcinogenesis’.

 

Paul joined Northumbria in May 2020 as a Senior Lecturer in Cellular and Molecular Sciences. 

Paul Jowsey

Qualifications

Biochemistry PhD December 03 2003

Research Themes and Scholarly Interests

Our cells are constantly exposed to endogenous and exogenous agents that can damage our genetic material (DNA) and cause mutations (potentially leading to cancer).  In addition, the normal cellular processes of DNA replication and mitosis pose a risk to genomic stability during each cell division, for example due to DNA polymerase errors and/or incorrect segregation of sister chromatids.  To protect our DNA, cells have evolved complex protein signalling pathways that control DNA repair and cell cycle regulation.  Our research aims to:

 

1) Characterise novel regulatory mechanisms that help to maintain genomic stability.  Current studies involve functional characterisation of novel post translational modifications that we have identified in the microcephalin-1 (MCPH1) tumour suppressor protein

 

2) Investigate cellular/cytogenetic changes induced by DNA damage that could contribute to disease.  Current studies focus on amplification of the c-MYC oncogene after exposure of cells to ionising radiation (X-rays).

 

3) Identify novel genetic factors and gene-environment interactions that might increase susceptibility to DNA damage and cancer.  Current studies focus on the impact of certain environmental factors on cells carrying a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 breast cancer susceptibility genes.

 

Such knowledge is essential to understand normal cellular function, understand disease mechanisms and identify potential novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

Key Publications

  • Please visit the Pure Research Information Portal for further information
  • Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on DNA damage in patients with depression, Ahmadimanesh, M., Abbaszadegan, M., Morshedi Rad, D., Moallem, S., Mohammadpour, A., Ghahremani, M., Farid Hosseini, F., Behdani, F., Akhondpour Manteghi, A., Jowsey, P., Shabani Behbahani, F., Moallem, S., Etemad, L. 1 Nov 2019, In: Journal of Psychopharmacology
  • M2I-1 disrupts the in vivo interaction between CDC20 and MAD2 and increases the sensitivities of cancer cell lines to anti-mitotic drugs via MCL-1s, Li, J., Dang, N., Martinez-Lopez, N., Jowsey, P., Huang, D., Lightowlers, R., Gao, F., Huang, J. Dec 2019, In: Cell Division
  • Phosphorylation of MCPH1 isoforms during mitosis followed by isoform-specific degradation by APC/C-CDH1, Meyer, S., Dunn, M., Vidler, D., Porter, A., Blain, P., Jowsey, P. Feb 2019, In: FASEB Journal
  • DNA damage and repair proteins in cellular response to sulfur mustard in Iranian veterans more than two decades after exposure, Khateri, S., Balali-Mood, M., Blain, P., Williams, F., Jowsey, P., Soroush, M., Behravan, E., Sadeghi, M. 1 Sep 2018, In: Toxicology Letters
  • Telomere shortening associated with increased levels of oxidative stress in sulfur mustard-exposed Iranian veterans, Behravan, E., Moallem, S., Kalalinia, F., Ahmadimanesh, M., Blain, P., Jowsey, P., Khateri, S., Forghanifard, M., BalaliMood, M. 1 Oct 2018, In: Mutation Research - Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis
  • Environmental Xenoestrogens Super-Activate a Variant Murine ER Beta in Cholangiocytes, Meyer, S., Probert, P., Lakey, A., Leitch, A., Blake, L., Jowsey, P., Cooke, M., Blain, P., Wright, M. Mar 2017, In: Toxicological Sciences
  • Hepatic effects of tartrazine (E 102) after systemic exposure are independent of oestrogen receptor interactions in the mouse, Meyer, S., Probert, P., Lakey, A., Axon, A., Leitch, A., Williams, F., Jowsey, P., Blain, P., Kass, G., Wright, M. 5 May 2017, In: Toxicology Letters
  • Fe65 Is Phosphorylated on Ser(289) after UV-Induced DNA Damage, Langlands, H., Blain, P., Jowsey, P. 13 May 2016, In: PLoS One
  • An expandable donor-free supply of functional hepatocytes for toxicology, Probert, P., Meyer, S., Alsaeedi, F., Axon, A., Fairhall, E., Wallace, K., Charles, M., Oakley, F., Jowsey, P., Blain, P., Wright, M. Mar 2015, In: Toxicology Research
  • Checkpoint kinase 1 is activated and promotes cell survival after exposure to sulphur mustard, Jowsey, P., Blain, P. 22 Jan 2015, In: Toxicology Letters


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